Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question
Solved

Bullet physics engine in xfx r7750

Tags:
  • Radeon
  • Engine
  • AMD
  • Bullet
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics Cards
October 28, 2012 3:36:18 PM

http://xfxforce.com/en-gb/Products/Graphics-Cards/AMD/A...
above given site describes about feature called bullet physics engine.
i am confused what is this on compared with nvidia phys x. Is this solution for physics engine for amd. And on searching other forums they say amd doesn't have physics engine.
so what this above feature say . does it have on-board or i have to add physics(bullet physics) processor additionally. and do all board partners have . i want all opinions and info about these weird feature . please guide me through all this .

More about : bullet physics engine xfx r7750

Anonymous
October 28, 2012 3:55:04 PM

Quote:
Bullet is an open source physics engine featuring 3D collision detection, soft body dynamics, and rigid body dynamics. It is used in games, and in visual effects in movies. The Bullet physics library is published under the zlib license. Erwin Coumans, its main author, worked for Sony Computer Entertainment US R&D from 2003 until 2010. He now works for AMD.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullet_(software)

the advantage of bullet physics is it is open software; anyone can code with it. however it still will need games to support it in the future. given that it is open source, easier to access the code, it ought to be more prevalent in the future but companies make illogical decisions all the time.
m
0
l
October 28, 2012 3:58:49 PM

but what do it play role in games. and the performance and feature comparison against nvidia phys x . do all board partners of amd can support bullet physics
m
0
l
Related resources
October 28, 2012 4:04:14 PM

what i am trying to say is -"does addition of bullet physics in amd is worth against nvidia physx gfx . to choose it "
m
0
l
October 28, 2012 4:08:23 PM

Anonymous said:
Quote:
Bullet is an open source physics engine featuring 3D collision detection, soft body dynamics, and rigid body dynamics. It is used in games, and in visual effects in movies. The Bullet physics library is published under the zlib license. Erwin Coumans, its main author, worked for Sony Computer Entertainment US R&D from 2003 until 2010. He now works for AMD.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullet_(software)

the advantage of bullet physics is it is open software; anyone can code with it. however it still will need games to support it in the future. given that it is open source, easier to access the code, it ought to be more prevalent in the future but companies make illogical decisions all the time.


what i am trying to say is -"does addition of bullet physics in amd is worth against nvidia physx gfx . to choose it "
m
0
l
Anonymous
October 28, 2012 4:12:55 PM

Vivekanand said:
but what do it play role in games. and the performance and feature comparison against nvidia phys x . do all board partners of amd can support bullet physics

to be honest, i hadn't heard of this until your post and googled it.

as far as a comparison; does this look different than PhysX?


it is a core software (engine) that can access the hardware (AMD gpu architecture) assuming this is new for the 7xxx series or AMD in general; it isn't the partners that need to support it but the game developers.

it is early to decide if this will overtake PhysX; like i hope you understand from what i am saying; it is up to the game developers. being open source, i would think so. but if nvidia wants to throw money around and promote their engine as better, which i can't see why it would be,you never know.
m
0
l
October 28, 2012 4:24:44 PM

Bullet Physics is on OpenCL, this works in hardware acceleration for BOTH GPU brands, as well as on CPU's.

Unfortunately however, there are no games released that utilize the engines GPU accelerated graphics.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b À AMD
October 28, 2012 4:49:52 PM

Are you sure it isn't DirectCompute? Either way, OpenCL and DirectCompute are pretty much the same thing, only one is part of DirectX.

Anyways, I think you are getting confused about what PhysX is. PhysX is a physics engine that has nothing to do with the graphics card in its basic form. It does calculations for special effects and physics problems in games.

The Bullet engine does the same thing.

The vast majority of the time, both engines are ran on the CPU, not your GPU.

What is confusing you, is often people just say PhysX, to refer to a feature Nvidia has for GPU accelerated PhysX. With GPU accelerated PhysX, the PhysX engine will use Nvidia CUDA cores to accelerate performance. These CUDA cores only exist on Nvidia cards and PPU's that have not been made in years and no longer supported.

OpenCL and DirectCompute is an open standard that companies support for general processing on a graphics processing unit (GPGPU). This supports both Nvidia and AMD cards and is similar to GPU accelerated PhysX. There has been some work in using this in games, however, as it is not proprietary, it doesn't get made known in marketing. It's possible the Bullet physics engine uses it, but I do not know, and it's not that important for the end user to know, as all DX11 cards support this.
Share
October 28, 2012 4:54:08 PM

As far as I can tell the bullet physics engine isn't owned or developed by AMD, I can understand why they would want to endorse it, so to speak however as far as I can tell they don't. The physics engine itself is used by the game developers and as such can be run on both amd and nvidia cards. It seems to me that it is a desperate attempt to try and 'con' prospective GPU buyers into going the AMD route because their cards can run a physics engine as well, while this is true the bullet physics engine is not unique to AMD cards and as such it isn't really that great of a selling point.
m
0
l
a b À AMD
October 28, 2012 5:13:15 PM

In the end, its work with the gpu developers that decide what gets added into a game or not. If a game dev works with Nvidia, Nvidia will push them to try to make it have physx and FXAA(TXAA if the devs have alot of time in their hands, but its a rarely sought after path because doing so would only cater to some of the players, and has alternatives). If AMD gets in on it, they tend to help with MSAA coding and may or may not push for something gimmicky like global illumination(dirt). In the end, it really depends on how much attention the caard makers work with the game developers, because the card developers want their card to run it right on its release. I dont see AMD openly supporting a physics type of display yet, but you cant never rule out a possibility.



I'm only saying its a possibility because AMD's "Gaming Evolved" Lineup is quickly growing, due to the closer relationship with AMD's developer's relationship team and the game developers themselves. source
m
0
l