Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Monitor...what to look for?

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • TV
  • Monitors
  • HDMI
  • Graphics
  • Product
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
October 29, 2012 9:38:11 PM

Im in the market for a new Monitor. I have no idea what to look for. Right now im using a 22" 1080P TV and connecting to my PC via HDMI. I'd like to keep the same size or go slightly larger and i obviously wouldnt mind finding a good deal. Can anyone lend a hand and let me know what to look for. Refresh rate is important correct? Other than than i have no idea the difference between one monitor or another.

More about : monitor

a c 90 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
October 29, 2012 9:48:16 PM

A 22 inch tv? Huh.

First of all, why are you upgrading? That'll give us a big insight into what you need. Second of all, what's a rough budget?

Refresh rate doesn't matter NEARLY as much as most of the people on here say. The reason for this is that refresh rates are actually two different measurements - the GtG (gray to gray) measurement, and the actual measurement.

A lot of people on here say you can't game without a 2ms refresh rate, when, in reality... the 2ms GtG refresh rate monitor has the SAME EXACT REFRESH RATE as a 5ms actual refresh rate monitor.

Sorry for the rant, but I've seen too many people buy the overpriced marketing gimmick of a "2ms" refresh rate before. Just make sure when you buy a 5ms monitor that it's 5ms actual, not GtG - that WILL make a difference.
m
0
l
October 29, 2012 10:05:57 PM

I was using a View Sonic VX2255wm 22" 1680x1050 then i switched to a Insignia 22" TV 1080P 16:9. Both diplays have had problems. The TV in particular has bad looking text. For gaming i think it looks great but the wife is complaining so...i need something new that will look good both in normal usage and also for gaming.

I would like to find something in the range of $200 - $250.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
October 29, 2012 11:07:42 PM

I'd get a 1920X1200 display, 16:10. The extra height is really nice.
m
0
l
a c 365 U Graphics card
a b x TV
a c 196 C Monitor
October 30, 2012 12:44:24 AM

DarkSable said:
A 22 inch tv? Huh.

First of all, why are you upgrading? That'll give us a big insight into what you need. Second of all, what's a rough budget?

Refresh rate doesn't matter NEARLY as much as most of the people on here say. The reason for this is that refresh rates are actually two different measurements - the GtG (gray to gray) measurement, and the actual measurement.

A lot of people on here say you can't game without a 2ms refresh rate, when, in reality... the 2ms GtG refresh rate monitor has the SAME EXACT REFRESH RATE as a 5ms actual refresh rate monitor.

Sorry for the rant, but I've seen too many people buy the overpriced marketing gimmick of a "2ms" refresh rate before. Just make sure when you buy a 5ms monitor that it's 5ms actual, not GtG - that WILL make a difference.



You are talking about Response Time. Also, all response time are grey-to-grey whether it is stated or not. That is simply the industry standard. The old method was BTW or Black-to-White response time which measured the fastest time it took for a pixel to change from black to white and is much slower than GtG which measure the fastest amount of time it takes to switch from one shade of grey to another shade of grey. Therefore, a monitor could have 2ms GtG and 16ms BTW, but companies stopped using BTW around 2005 since they can advertise lower response times using GtG. In other words, a marketing gimmick.

Actual response times are never advertised since they actually have to be tested for. Xbitlabs.com used to measure the actual performance of monitor response times, unfortunately they stopped doing so because you need expensive equipment to this type of testing as well as a lot of time and a controlled environment. Anyway, some of their test have shown that even though the advertised response time could be as low as 2ms or 5ms, the slowest response times could be anywhere from 250ms to 300ms. So the response times advertised for monitors are under the best conditions when displaying shades of grey. Since displaying various shades throughout the screen is of no practical use in the real world, no one will ever get 2ms of response time performance.

Refresh Rate is the frequency at which the monitor accepts incoming video signals and the maximum number of times per second the LCD screen refreshes per second. When talking about refresh rate you are basically referring to 60Hz and 120Hz monitors. 60Hz monitors only accepts 60Hz input and can display up to a maximum of 60FPS (frames per second). 120Hz monitors accept 120Hz input using a dual-link DVI cable; DVI only transmits at 60Hz so using dual DVI means 60Hz x 2 = 120Hz. 120Hz can also display up to 120FPS assuming the graphics card is power enough to do so.

One other thing... all 3D monitors are 120Hz monitors, but not all 120Hz monitors are 3D monitors.

Getting back to Response Times, generally speaking, the lower the response time, the less chances there of ghosting effects. However, 5ms to 8ms is still acceptable for games. In fact, some people who owns monitors with 12ms response times, states that is still good enough to play games. Therefore, whether you are buying a 2ms or 5ms monitor, actual gaming performance should be similar.
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 365 U Graphics card
a b x TV
a c 196 C Monitor
October 30, 2012 12:50:01 AM

justcallmejoe said:
Im in the market for a new Monitor. I have no idea what to look for. Right now im using a 22" 1080P TV and connecting to my PC via HDMI. I'd like to keep the same size or go slightly larger and i obviously wouldnt mind finding a good deal. Can anyone lend a hand and let me know what to look for. Refresh rate is important correct? Other than than i have no idea the difference between one monitor or another.


Determining what monitor is best for your situation is extreme subjective. The best advice I can give is to go a site like Newegg and look for monitors that fit your price range, size, response time requirement, and anything like height adjustment. Then read some of the positive reviews just to get an idea, but focus on the negative reviews to see there are a lot of people complaining about the same thing.

In general, I recommend Asus monitors because they are inexpensive and have good build quality in general. I would stay far away from Hanns-G and Hannspree monitors (same company). Dell monitors are good, and so are HP in general. I tend to avoid Acer. Viewsonic is decent enough.
Share
October 30, 2012 7:37:33 PM

Best answer selected by justcallmejoe.
m
0
l
!