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New 350XT- likes & dislikes

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Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:35:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

OK, have only had the camera for a couple of days, but...

#1: It will be very difficult to go back to a P&S camera again. It is *so*
much easier to see what you're taking a picture of (through the viewfinder).
I was never a fan of the LCD screens anyway, nearly always using the
viewfinder on my Oly5050, D40, 3030 & Fuji E-510. But they're so small and
difficult to use, plus no exposure info. The Rebel 350XT is incredible!

Of course, compared to other DSLRs, the Rebel's viewfinder doesn't win
points for brightness, but for me, it's great.

#2: Going to take a while getting used to depth-of-field issues. Gotta learn
more about the various focus modes. Nice that it's easy to get to the manual
focus switch on the lens (I've got the 17-85 IS).

#3: Biggest gripe- and it's a BIG one that hopefully will be fixed in future
firmware revisions- you have no way of knowing what ISO you're shooting at.
It doesn't appear on the B&W LCD on the back (which is very readable) nor in
the viewfinder. You can view it on the color LCD if you push the "info"
button and if it's very dim lighting... extremely difficult to see.

It's also very difficult to see what you're changing it from/to. That color
LCD leaves something to be desired when you're trying to see the tiny
numbers on the screen.

In my perfect world, the ISO is shown in the viewfinder. In my
almost-perfect world, it's on the B&W LCD display. In my
not-nearly-perfect-but-workable world, it's shown in really big letters when
you push the ISO button on the back.

More to come!

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

More about : 350xt likes dislikes

Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>
> #3: Biggest gripe- ... you have no way of knowing what ISO you're shooting at.

Ditto for the D70. I couldn't stand Auto-ISO because you don't know what
it's doing until you shoot & view the second screen on the preview.

> It doesn't appear on the B&W LCD on the back (which is very readable)

For the D70, press the ISO button & it shows on the B&W LCD then turn
the main dial to change.


> nor in
> the viewfinder. You can view it on the color LCD if you push the "info"
> button and if it's very dim lighting... extremely difficult to see.
>
> It's also very difficult to see what you're changing it from/to. That color
> LCD leaves something to be desired when you're trying to see the tiny
> numbers on the screen.
>
> In my perfect world, the ISO is shown in the viewfinder. In my
> almost-perfect world, it's on the B&W LCD display. In my
> not-nearly-perfect-but-workable world, it's shown in really big letters when
> you push the ISO button on the back.


--
Paul Furman
http://www.edgehill.net/1
san francisco native plants
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Paul Furman wrote:
> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
> >
> > #3: Biggest gripe- ... you have no way of knowing what ISO you're shooting at.
>
> Ditto for the D70. I couldn't stand Auto-ISO because you don't know what
> it's doing until you shoot & view the second screen on the preview.
>


Yeah. Even if Canon had auto-ISO I'd never use it. Don't want the
camera making that decision for me.........
Related resources
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

MarkH wrote:
>
> Apparently my Canon has auto-ISO in some of those dummy modes that I never
> use.

Right, and since we don't use those modes, we don't get auto-ISO....
No loss.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 1:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

>
> Although ultimately it would be nice to have a programmable function where
> you could determine how the camera would react when faced with a
> not-enough-light situation. For example, let's say you needed to keep the
> shutter speed at or above 1/500.
>
> * First, maintain aperture of F8 or greater as long as speed can be above
> 1/500.
>
> *When aperture can no longer maintain speed above 1/500, open aperture step
> by step until it maxes out.
>
> *When aperture maxes out, increase ISO.


Well, yeah!!! That'd be nice. What the camera makers should do is
create some sort of user scripting language so that we could program
these machines to do things along those lines.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 4:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Tue, 31 May 2005 21:35:12 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote:

>OK, have only had the camera for a couple of days, but...
>
>#1: It will be very difficult to go back to a P&S camera again. It is *so*
>much easier to see what you're taking a picture of (through the viewfinder).
>I was never a fan of the LCD screens anyway, nearly always using the
>viewfinder on my Oly5050, D40, 3030 & Fuji E-510. But they're so small and
>difficult to use, plus no exposure info. The Rebel 350XT is incredible!
>
>Of course, compared to other DSLRs, the Rebel's viewfinder doesn't win
>points for brightness, but for me, it's great.
>
>#2: Going to take a while getting used to depth-of-field issues. Gotta learn
>more about the various focus modes. Nice that it's easy to get to the manual
>focus switch on the lens (I've got the 17-85 IS).
>
>#3: Biggest gripe- and it's a BIG one that hopefully will be fixed in future
>firmware revisions- you have no way of knowing what ISO you're shooting at.
>It doesn't appear on the B&W LCD on the back (which is very readable) nor in
>the viewfinder. You can view it on the color LCD if you push the "info"
>button and if it's very dim lighting... extremely difficult to see.
>
>It's also very difficult to see what you're changing it from/to. That color
>LCD leaves something to be desired when you're trying to see the tiny
>numbers on the screen.
>
>In my perfect world, the ISO is shown in the viewfinder. In my
>almost-perfect world, it's on the B&W LCD display. In my
>not-nearly-perfect-but-workable world, it's shown in really big letters when
>you push the ISO button on the back.
>
>More to come!
>
>--Mike Jacoubowsky
>Chain Reaction Bicycles
>www.ChainReaction.com
>Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
>

Picture-wise, it's a great camera, but physically, compared
to it's 20D brother and the Olympus E-300, it comes off as
way too plasticky and insubstatial. I'm wondering if Nikon's
D50 will be just like it?
-Rich
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 5:04:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>> > #3: Biggest gripe- ... you have no way of knowing what ISO you're
>> > shooting at.
>>
>> Ditto for the D70. I couldn't stand Auto-ISO because you don't know what
>> it's doing until you shoot & view the second screen on the preview.
>>
>
>
> Yeah. Even if Canon had auto-ISO I'd never use it. Don't want the
> camera making that decision for me.........

Although ultimately it would be nice to have a programmable function where
you could determine how the camera would react when faced with a
not-enough-light situation. For example, let's say you needed to keep the
shutter speed at or above 1/500.

* First, maintain aperture of F8 or greater as long as speed can be above
1/500.

*When aperture can no longer maintain speed above 1/500, open aperture step
by step until it maxes out.

*When aperture maxes out, increase ISO.

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

<briansgooglegroupemail@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1117583142.168944.73900@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Paul Furman wrote:
>> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>> >
>> > #3: Biggest gripe- ... you have no way of knowing what ISO you're
>> > shooting at.
>>
>> Ditto for the D70. I couldn't stand Auto-ISO because you don't know what
>> it's doing until you shoot & view the second screen on the preview.
>>
>
>
> Yeah. Even if Canon had auto-ISO I'd never use it. Don't want the
> camera making that decision for me.........
>
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 5:04:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

>
> *When aperture can no longer maintain speed above 1/500, open aperture step
> by step until it maxes out.
>
> *When aperture maxes out, increase ISO.

Composition Priority, in effect.


--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
June 1, 2005 5:04:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

briansgooglegroupemail@yahoo.com wrote in
news:1117583142.168944.73900@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

>
>
> Paul Furman wrote:
>> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>> >
>> > #3: Biggest gripe- ... you have no way of knowing what ISO you're
>> > shooting at.
>>
>> Ditto for the D70. I couldn't stand Auto-ISO because you don't know
>> what it's doing until you shoot & view the second screen on the
>> preview.
>>
>
> Yeah. Even if Canon had auto-ISO I'd never use it. Don't want the
> camera making that decision for me.........

Apparently my Canon has auto-ISO in some of those dummy modes that I never
use.

I only ever use P, Av, Tv and M depending on which parameter I am willing
to let the camera decide. I have not yet been in a position where I want
my camera to decide the ISO for me.



--
Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 3-May-05)
"There are 10 types of people, those that
understand binary and those that don't"
June 1, 2005 6:46:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Mike Jacoubowsky" <MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote in message
news:kM4ne.870$wy1.710@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...

> Of course, compared to other DSLRs, the Rebel's viewfinder doesn't win
> points for brightness, but for me, it's great.

A bright viewfinder is a function of the camera body and the lens (fast
lenses give you a brighter viewfinder generally). I found the Rebel's
viewfinder on the borderline of unacceptable (IMHO). Having a large AND
bright viewfinder is very important to me. I wish the 20D had a
larger/brighter viewfinder. My buddy's Nikon F5 has the most amazing
view-finder. Here is another really nice viewfinder:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos1dmkii/page4.as...

Its amazing how these non-photo-quality-adding features start to look very
necessary in real-life shooting.

> #2: Going to take a while getting used to depth-of-field issues. Gotta
learn
> more about the various focus modes. Nice that it's easy to get to the
manual
> focus switch on the lens (I've got the 17-85 IS).

Avoid f22 on that lens. Anything above f16 muddies things up (despite basic
DOF theory saying to stop down to the max for max DOF).

This lens does not have distance markings, so Google for hyperfocal tables.
Make sure you get the ones that compensate for 1.6x crop (I have a
spreadsheet for this).

>
> In my perfect world, the ISO is shown in the viewfinder. In my
> almost-perfect world, it's on the B&W LCD display. In my
> not-nearly-perfect-but-workable world, it's shown in really big letters
when
> you push the ISO button on the back.
>
In regard to viewable ISO:

Perfect world = 1D, 1Ds
Ideal world = 20D

Musty.
June 1, 2005 9:09:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"RichA" <none@none.com> wrote in message
> >
>
> Picture-wise, it's a great camera, but physically, compared
> to it's 20D brother and the Olympus E-300, it comes off as
> way too plasticky and insubstatial. I'm wondering if Nikon's
> D50 will be just like it?
> -Rich

Whoah! careful there RichA. We already had a big thread about this - and
this could be a flame war. The XT is a damn fine camera for the money. It
creates high quality images and for many users, they do not need the extra
"workability" features. Its still better than buying something like a Canon
G5 or Oly C8080. Insubstantial for user A can be enough for user B. I am
sure that many users would deem the 20D just as unsubstantial (eg the 1.6x
crop just sux on the wide end, its not weather-sealed, very average
viewfinder, did I say 1.6x sensor?).

BTW, what do you shoot with (just curious, not trying to compare cameras or
anything)....

Musty.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 9:09:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 05:09:55 GMT, "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:

>
>"RichA" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>> >
>>
>> Picture-wise, it's a great camera, but physically, compared
>> to it's 20D brother and the Olympus E-300, it comes off as
>> way too plasticky and insubstatial. I'm wondering if Nikon's
>> D50 will be just like it?
>> -Rich
>
>Whoah! careful there RichA. We already had a big thread about this - and
>this could be a flame war. The XT is a damn fine camera for the money. It
>creates high quality images and for many users, they do not need the extra
>"workability" features. Its still better than buying something like a Canon
>G5 or Oly C8080. Insubstantial for user A can be enough for user B. I am
>sure that many users would deem the 20D just as unsubstantial (eg the 1.6x
>crop just sux on the wide end, its not weather-sealed, very average
>viewfinder, did I say 1.6x sensor?).
>
>BTW, what do you shoot with (just curious, not trying to compare cameras or
>anything)....
>
>Musty.
>

I'm using an 8080 until I can figure out which DSLR to get. I actually
chose it over the Rebel and E-300. But I agree about shooting with an
XT being superior to any prosumer in terms of some aspects of image
quality. It gets "better" as your lens choice improves.
I haven't gone to a DSLR yet because I've got this odd feeling that
in short order, some company is going to release one that incorporates
all the unique features now found scattered across a few DSLRs. With
the rapid price changes that happen when a new model is introduced
(you can get a D-Rebel new now for $620 U.S. with a zoom) I don't
want to be holding something that doesn't do everything I want it
to, when I believe what I want is only a short time off. The Fuji S3
seems like a good choice, given it's ability to handle contrast
issues, but it's (IMO) still too pricey for what it is.
As for the 1.6 sensor, I'm wondering what will happen now Kodak has
bailed and Canon is now the sole provider of full frame sensors? I
have a feeling that the sensor may have been the issue making the
Kodak so expensive to produce they decided to kill it, but then again,
they just may like the 100% margins they get on the cheap consumer
cameras.
Maybe I'm being unreasonable? All I want is:
-Dust elimination like the E-300
-Contrast handling like the S3
-Noise limits like Canon
-The robustness of a Nikon D100 or Canon 20D
All in one.
-Rich
June 1, 2005 10:09:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"RichA" <none@none.com> wrote in message
news:shhq91p11s4qrs150lqpg68mpkdhdcut5f@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 05:09:55 GMT, "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>
> Maybe I'm being unreasonable? All I want is:
> -Dust elimination like the E-300
> -Contrast handling like the S3
> -Noise limits like Canon
> -The robustness of a Nikon D100 or Canon 20D
> All in one.
> -Rich
>

You may end up waiting a long time. The C8080 is an excellent camera. I am
the previous owner of the C5050Z before plunging into the world of DSLR. It
was a great camera for my needs at the time. Because you have the C8080, you
can probably wait a while, but really I think that camera bodies come and
go - and the lenses stay (atleast for a decade or more).

Its the lens system which really matters. I consider Nikon & Canon as having
the best lens systems (with all major 3rd party manufacturers supporting
their mounts). If you think you want the flexibility and quality of DSLR
(the glass), then go ahead and make a choice. I dont like the Oly 4:3
business to be quite honest. The thing I like about my 20D is that (if I
avoid "digital-only" lenses), I will end up with glass that will port to a
FF or 1.3x camera in the future. Dust elimination is not a big deal BTW. I
am so used to cleaning my sensor now - its a simple chore (really).

I think Canon have the edge on DSLR and lenses (although I really like the
Nikkor stuff). If I was buying a DSLR today, I would still pick the 20D. The
1D line is not worth the cost to me - I have put that money towards very
high-end glass.

Musty.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 12:31:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

RichA wrote:

> Maybe I'm being unreasonable? All I want is:
> -Dust elimination like the E-300
> -Contrast handling like the S3
> -Noise limits like Canon
> -The robustness of a Nikon D100 or Canon 20D
> All in one.

You left out A-S from the Max 7D
large monitor (Max 7D)
Robustness to include Max 7D.

;-)

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 9:33:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>> *When aperture can no longer maintain speed above 1/500, open aperture
>> step by step until it maxes out.
>>
>> *When aperture maxes out, increase ISO.
>
> Composition Priority, in effect.

Forgive my ignorance, but is there actually such a thing, or is that a new
feature you've just coined? :>)

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 11:48:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 06:09:08 GMT, "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:

>
>"RichA" <none@none.com> wrote in message
>news:shhq91p11s4qrs150lqpg68mpkdhdcut5f@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 05:09:55 GMT, "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>>
>> Maybe I'm being unreasonable? All I want is:
>> -Dust elimination like the E-300
>> -Contrast handling like the S3
>> -Noise limits like Canon
>> -The robustness of a Nikon D100 or Canon 20D
>> All in one.
>> -Rich
>>
>
>You may end up waiting a long time. The C8080 is an excellent camera. I am
>the previous owner of the C5050Z before plunging into the world of DSLR. It
>was a great camera for my needs at the time. Because you have the C8080, you
>can probably wait a while, but really I think that camera bodies come and
>go - and the lenses stay (atleast for a decade or more).
>
>Its the lens system which really matters. I consider Nikon & Canon as having
>the best lens systems (with all major 3rd party manufacturers supporting
>their mounts). If you think you want the flexibility and quality of DSLR
>(the glass), then go ahead and make a choice. I dont like the Oly 4:3
>business to be quite honest. The thing I like about my 20D is that (if I
>avoid "digital-only" lenses), I will end up with glass that will port to a
>FF or 1.3x camera in the future. Dust elimination is not a big deal BTW. I
>am so used to cleaning my sensor now - its a simple chore (really).

True. People who don't know the mechnics of it are paranoid, but
as an owner of hundreds of telescopes and related accessories,
I'm used to cleaning things like that, first surface mirrors, etc.
>
>I think Canon have the edge on DSLR and lenses (although I really like the
>Nikkor stuff). If I was buying a DSLR today, I would still pick the 20D. The
>1D line is not worth the cost to me - I have put that money towards very
>high-end glass.
>
>Musty.
>
>
And you're method is the best since you'll never compromise the
ability of the sensor with inferior glass.
-Rich
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 11:50:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 08:31:58 -0400, Alan Browne
<alan.browne@FreelunchVideotron.ca> wrote:

>RichA wrote:
>
>> Maybe I'm being unreasonable? All I want is:
>> -Dust elimination like the E-300
>> -Contrast handling like the S3
>> -Noise limits like Canon
>> -The robustness of a Nikon D100 or Canon 20D
>> All in one.
>
>You left out A-S from the Max 7D
> large monitor (Max 7D)
> Robustness to include Max 7D.
>
>;-)

I know! I should have mentioned IS of some sort.
The Max 7D is more like the 20D class of camera than
the Rebel. I also left out manual focus ability, which
I think all digital SLRs have.
-Rich
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 2:22:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:fk9ne.18835$j51.7861@tornado.texas.rr.com...
>
> "Mike Jacoubowsky" <MikeJ@ChainReaction.com> wrote in message
> news:kM4ne.870$wy1.710@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>
>> Of course, compared to other DSLRs, the Rebel's viewfinder doesn't win
>> points for brightness, but for me, it's great.
>
> A bright viewfinder is a function of the camera body and the lens (fast
> lenses give you a brighter viewfinder generally). I found the Rebel's
> viewfinder on the borderline of unacceptable (IMHO). Having a large AND
> bright viewfinder is very important to me. I wish the 20D had a
> larger/brighter viewfinder. My buddy's Nikon F5 has the most amazing
> view-finder. Here is another really nice viewfinder:
>

You want bright viewfinders, pick up a Pentax.
!