Changing card to Nvidia Geforce GTX 460?

Hello guys!

I just wanted to ask if i could change my current video card to the Nvidia Geforce gtx 460 (i have enough money to buy it, don't worry :na: ).

Currently I have the "Nvidia Geforce 9600 GS" which was an awesome video card at the time (in 2007 :p , when I bought my gaming pc), but now it's pretty old and slow.

Fortunately, despite my old card, I have a very good PC and i can run demanding games like "Skyrim" at "High settings (without AA)" and "Dishonored" at "High settings (either with FXAA or with MSAA)" and I was quite impressed to see that I could run them smoothly even if I didn't meet the minimum requirements :wahoo: (minimum video card to run dishonored: GTX 460!!! :o )!

However, I can't run games like "Saint's row the third" or Crysis 1: i mean, I could run them at minimum settings, but I don't want to play games (with potentially great graphics) that look like s**t! :fou:

My pc specs:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @2.40 GHz
Mainboard: Benicia / manufacturer: Pegatron Corporation
RAM: 4 GB
Video card: Nvidia GeForce 9600 GS
DirectX: 10
OS: Windows Vista Home Premium Service pack 2 (64 bit)
Computer case: Hp pavillion

Could you please tell me if the the GTX 460 compatible with my pc?

Thanks in advance :)
28 answers Last reply
More about changing card nvidia geforce
  1. Yes, it's compatible with no doubt.. :)
    GTX 460 was the first Gaming card (The Peoples Choice).
  2. xtreme5 said:
    Yes, it's compatible with no doubt.. :)
    GTX 460 was the first Gaming card (The Peoples Choice).


    Really? :) I'm so happy! Thanks a lot xtreme5, I think i'm gonna buy it soon xD
  3. GTX 460 is a fantastic card, and it will serve you well, but don't pay too much for it, it is a few years old itself.
  4. I am very confused why upgrade to such an old card?

    600 nvida series/7000 AMD series use less power and generate less heat also you get driver support for modern games something you won't have such luck with an old GPU.
  5. How much are you paying and whats your budget. As said you can probably get a better card for the same money or less.
    And it will probably use less power. As no one asked about the PSU yet(or I missed it) the less power the better usually.

    Mactronix :)
  6. hugemetalfan said:
    Really? :) I'm so happy! Thanks a lot xtreme5, I think i'm gonna buy it soon xD

    yes, A friend of minet using this card and and almost 4 years old and still working like a new one.
  7. xtreme5 said:
    yes, A friend of minet using this card and and almost 4 years old and still working like a new one.


    What resolution do you game at?

    And also make sure your PSU can handle a 460 it needs 24amps on the 12v rail and at least a 400w PSU.

    Also how much are you paying for the 460?
  8. williamjuly2003 said:
    I am very confused why upgrade to such an old card?

    600 nvida series/7000 AMD series use less power and generate less heat also you get driver support for modern games something you won't have such luck with an old GPU.


    Cost plain and simple. I got my refurbished 460 for less than $80 from an online reseller. It absolutely smoked my ATI 5750. I purchased it for it's cuda cores and kept it for gaming.

    As far as drivers go I have been unhappy with the HDMI audio driver. I may have to work around the Nvidia audio bridge. Still they seem to be updating for all the big games.
  9. joe_newbuilder said:
    Cost plain and simple. I got my refurbished 460 for less than $80 from an online reseller. It absolutely smoked my ATI 5750. I purchased it for it's cuda cores and kept it for gaming.

    As far as drivers go I have been unhappy with the HDMI audio driver. I may have to work around the Nvidia audio bridge. Still they seem to be updating for all the big games.



    Did I fall asleep and wake up in a alternate reality here or are you using your first post to answer a question that was directed at the OP and couldn't have possibly been directed at you as have only just posted on the thread :pt1cable:

    Mactronix :)
  10. Hi hugemetalfan,

    You won't regret it. Funny thing about a year ago I was in the same situation as you. I was using a 9600GT which served me well through the years and I upgraded to a GTX 460 and now I run everything at max settings.

    A few things to consider:

    - Look for the version of the GTX 460 with a 256-bit memory interface. There are cheaper versions with a 192-bit interface, but of course you'll get less performance but they are still good cards nevertheless.

    - You haven't mentioned what power supply you have yet? Make sure you have at least 2 x PCI-E power connectors because this is what the GTX 460 needs. If I remember well my 9600 GT needed only 1.
  11. A Radeon 7770 would probably be better right now. With current drivers, the 7770s perform right around the GTX 460 256 bit cards and are far more energy efficient with fairly similar prices that can be made up even when they're higher in the power bill in less than a year unless you manage to find a 460 for like $40.
  12. MC_K7 said:
    Hi hugemetalfan,

    You won't regret it. Funny thing about a year ago I was in the same situation as you. I was using a 9600GT which served me well through the years and I upgraded to a GTX 460 and now I run everything at max settings.

    A few things to consider:

    - Look for the version of the GTX 460 with a 256-bit memory interface. There are cheaper versions with a 192-bit interface, but of course you'll get less performance but they are still good cards nevertheless.

    - You haven't mentioned what power supply you have yet? Make sure you have at least 2 x PCI-E power connectors because this is what the GTX 460 needs. If I remember well my 9600 GT needed only 1.



    i'm not a big expert, but i saw 230V behind.

    and the case from behind is similar to this pic (mine has more plugs and stuff on it, but the upper part looks just like it)
    http://www.google.it/imgres?q=hp+pavilion+case&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1440&bih=785&tbm=isch&tbnid=E5fqyXoeDlqMGM:&imgrefurl=http://news.tigerdirect.com/2008/05/15/hp-pavilion-m8200n-amd-desktop-pc/&docid=aUBw6HqD-K-ahM&imgurl=http://news.tigerdirect.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/m975-2007-out3-la.jpg&w=430&h=398&ei=QG-ZUPP5F8ntsgaymIDABA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=597&vpy=454&dur=437&hovh=183&hovw=198&tx=103&ty=78&sig=113334094085482226933&page=1&tbnh=139&tbnw=151&start=0&ndsp=27&ved=1t:429,r:16,s:0,i:117
  13. mactronix said:
    How much are you paying and whats your budget. As said you can probably get a better card for the same money or less.
    And it will probably use less power. As no one asked about the PSU yet(or I missed it) the less power the better usually.

    Mactronix :)



    230V
  14. williamjuly2003 said:
    I am very confused why upgrade to such an old card?

    600 nvida series/7000 AMD series use less power and generate less heat also you get driver support for modern games something you won't have such luck with an old GPU.


    it's a relatively "old card"... it's like buying an iphone...next year the iphone 5 will be "old".

    btw, i don't need a super duper powerful 10000 € card, I just want to have a very good performance, and in my case, the gtx 460 is enough. If I had it, I could run all the games I have at max settings smoothly
  15. hugemetalfan said:
    it's a relatively "old card"... it's like buying an iphone...next year the iphone 5 will be "old".

    btw, i don't need a super duper powerful 10000 € card, I just want to have a very good performance, and in my case, the gtx 460 is enough. If I had it, I could run all the games I have at max settings smoothly


    You're acting as if newer means more expensive when that's not the case. The Radoen 7770 is about as fast as the GTX 460 256 bit with current drivers (probably right between it and the 192 bit version, but that's still indistinguishably close and), similarly priced, and far more energy efficient. It's like buying a new $200 phone instead of buying an older $200 phone that has similar performance, but say four hours of battery time instead of more like eight or ten hours with the same battery capacity and the newer version also has more modern features. There's no good reason to go for the older one unless you get one that's extremely cheap such as a used unit for only a few dozen $.
  16. @ blazorthon
    Some people just get set on what they want and wont be persuaded any other way is better.

    Some of the replies are starting to set my Troll alarm off anyway and if the OP wont listen to reason then I say fine.

    Mactronix :)
  17. I'm not saying that OP can't get a GTX 460 if OP wants to; I'm just making sure that OP is aware of the superior alternatives. The 460 is a decent, albeit particularly power-inefficient, mid-ranged graphics card.
  18. How much is being paid for the 460?
  19. blazorthon said:
    I'm not saying that OP can't get a GTX 460 if OP wants to; I'm just making sure that OP is aware of the superior alternatives. The 460 is a decent, albeit particularly power-inefficient, mid-ranged graphics card.


    Oh yes I realise that, others myself included tried it earlier in the thread but the answers there after are just bizarre.

    Mactronix :)
  20. hugemetalfan said:


    Unfortunately, we can't work with "something similar to this or that". You need to give us your exact case model with your exact power supply model. Otherwise you're likely to have a bad surprise believe me this is for your own good last thing you want is to damage the card with a bad power supply or simply find out it's not compatible.

    What model of HP Pavillon do you have? Is it stock or did you already modified some components inside? Or more importantly is it the original power supply that came with the HP Pavillon? If that's the case I'm surprised you could even use a 9600 GSO because the minimum requirement for it is 400-Watt PSU with 1 x 6-pin PCI-E power connector and most HP Pavillon don't even have that. They usually have a very cheap power supply, something like 230 or 300-Watt without any PCI-E connector most of the time.

    Don't forget that the minimum PSU requirement for the GTX-460 is 450 Watt with 2 x 6-pin PCI-E. You need to make sure your power supply have that. Otherwise you might need to change your power supply. By the way the Radeon 7770 have similar requirements: 500 Watt with 2 x 6-pin connectors.
  21. MC_K7 said:
    Unfortunately, we can't work with "something similar to this or that". You need to give us your exact case model with your exact power supply model. Otherwise you're likely to have a bad surprise believe me this is for your own good last thing you want is to damage the card with a bad power supply or simply find out it's not compatible.

    What model of HP Pavillon do you have? Is it stock or did you already modified some components inside? Or more importantly is it the original power supply that came with the HP Pavillon? If that's the case I'm surprised you could even use a 9600 GSO because the minimum requirement for it is 400-Watt PSU with 1 x 6-pin PCI-E power connector and most HP Pavillon don't even have that. They usually have a very cheap power supply, something like 230 or 300-Watt without any PCI-E connector most of the time.

    Don't forget that the minimum PSU requirement for the GTX-460 is 450 Watt with 2 x 6-pin PCI-E. You need to make sure your power supply have that. Otherwise you might need to change your power supply. By the way the Radeon 7770 have similar requirements: 500 Watt with 2 x 6-pin connectors.


    Those aren't requirements, they're over-simplified guidelines for the inexperienced. Wattage is almsot irrelevant. What matters is +12V power delivery, but that's a little more complex than just saying wattage, so graphics card companies simply give minimum recommendations that take into account the possibility of an unbalanced system with ridiculously high power consumption CPUs or other such parts as well as crappy power supplies.

    For example, many good 430W/450W PSUs can handle even a GTX 680 with an overclocked i5-3570K at around 4.3GHz-4.5GHz with decent voltage. Many 350/360W/380W power supplies are more than enough for a 7770 with a fairly low power CPU and otherwise not ridiculous system.
  22. Forgot to mention, but you can't find information about a power supply by reading behind. You need to open the case and look inside, the wattage is usually written on the side of the PSU. Here's an example for a HP Pavillon.

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=us&dlc=en&docname=bph06788&lc=en&product=3548185

    If there is a brand or model written on the PSU please provide. The more information you find the better.

    Also try to look at the PCI-E power connector that is going from the power supply to your 9600 GSO, and try to see if there is another one available inside the case (you need 2 for the GTX-460 don't forget).
  23. blazorthon: I know that every graphic cards company greatly exaggerate the minimum power requirements. Most cards will work perfectly on a lesser power supply. If he's already able to run a 9600 GSO, he should be able to run a GTX-460 if his current PSU has at least 2 x 6-pin PCI-E.
  24. blazorthon: And I forgot to mention that my main concern are the PCI-E connectors. From my experience, the power supplies you find inside basic PCs made by Dell/HP/Acer/Gateway etc. don't provide a lot of PCI-E connector (or most of the time won't provide any). This is why I was asking him if he already replaced his PSU in the past since he's already running a 9600 GSO. I wasn't too worried about the wattage.
  25. Got it. I replied because the post that I replied to didn't make that clear. Also, the 7770 doesn't need tow 6 pin connectors, it only needs one. The 7850 (usually, there may be some exceptions) has two six pin connectors.
  26. MC_K7 said:
    blazorthon: I know that every graphic cards company greatly exaggerate the minimum power requirements. Most cards will work perfectly on a lesser power supply. If he's already able to run a 9600 GSO, he should be able to run a GTX-460 if his current PSU has at least 2 x 6-pin PCI-E.



    If the wattage is fine he may be able ot use a 4pin to 6pin adapter to fit the 460 in his system.

    I have a 380w PSU running a 460 with 1 6pin off the psu and 1 that is from an adapter. Everything is running and cool stable.

    You may even be able to get one packaged with the card. My card came with that adapter.
  27. Quote:
    The gtx 460 can be found for between 80 to 100. The 7770 is no faster and start at 110 shipped.

    the one I got is still available
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B003VKGZSM/ref=dp_olp_refurbished?ie=UTF8&condition=refurbished

    In my system I was running a ati 5770 and the GTX460 pushed out so much more performance (SCII and Mass effect 3) I was able to run both games at max setting and 1920x1080. At $80 it outperformed my $100 card significantly.

    You an try and argue that the driver support is worth $30 ~40 but on an older system it is doubtful. By the time that becomes an issue he will need a new CPU/MB to go faster.


    How is the 5770 relevant at all to this?

    Why would you need to wait for more drivers? Current drivers let the 7770 take the lead on the 192 bit 460 and fight with the 256 bit model, maybe even surpass it too.

    Your link is a used unit, not new, yet you compare it to new 7770 pricing. That's a completely unfair comparison. New 460s are generally significantly more expensive than new 7770s.
  28. Quote:
    The OP's system is pretty old. They should be looking at used hardware for that system or a new system.

    If the discussion is placing a brand new 460 in a core duo 2 system with 4 gb of ram. Then this whole thread is makes no sense. Looking at his hardware it is unlikely he can saturate the 460 at a 192bit bus or the 7770 at 256bit.

    Looking at driver support He is running vista. An older card will have older drivers that would have had a Vista targeted.

    I was not aware there were new 460's being made. I though it was a bit like saying you wanted to buy a new 2007 Ford.

    The op should not spend more than $100. Any more than that and he can grab a new Mb with a new CPU and integrated graphics that will out perform his current system and a new card.


    Age of OP's system is irrelevant. An old system is not a good reason to skimp on quality of upgrades. In fact, it is quite the opposite because you'd want to reduce reliability issues at that point.

    The Q6600 at 2.4GHz most certainly is plenty for most games with these graphics cards. There is no 7770 256 bit, it is a 128 bit card. We are talking about 192 bit 460s and 256 bit 460s against the 7770, which despite it's slimmer memory bus, is generally the superior card overall.

    Vista has full driver support with 7 for AMD's current drivers, so any argument about drivers is irrelevant and nonsensical. Furthermore, even if OP gets a GTX 460, OP would be using new drivers, not old drivers unless OP wants a computer that doesn't work properly.

    No, it's like saying I don't want a second or third hand card that has greater risk of not working properly and greater chance of poor customer support.

    Why should OP not spend a little over $100? OP couldn't get a new mobo, CPU, and integrated graphics solution that bests the 7770 no matter how much OP pays for it because no integrated graphics can come near the 7770 right now and OP won't find a CPU plus motherboard for $100 that beats the Q6600.

    None of what you said in this post is accurate and I speak from experience with many of these components.
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