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Any advise on my planned build is appreciated

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December 26, 2012 12:19:44 AM

Hi all, I'm planning on buying parts for my new build in the next couple of weeks.
It's going to be a Gaming/HTPC/3D Modeling combo build to last for the next 5 years or so. I will be OCing it a bit and probably be going SLI down the road. I'll be using my current monitors and keyboard/mouse.

Any advise on the parts list that I have so far is greatly appreciated.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Antec KUHLER H2O 920 110.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus V Formula EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($279.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 3TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Thermaltake Chaser MK-1 ATX Full Tower Computer Case ($109.99 @ NCIX)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 1250W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($230.92 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($59.60 @ NCIX US)

My main worry about this build is that the board wouldn't fit into the case. Does anyone have experience with Asus Maximus V Formula fitting into a ATX tower?
December 26, 2012 2:13:49 AM

There's no need to spend that much on a motherboard. The Gigabyte UD5H will give you the same performance for $100 less. You can even get the ASRock Z77 Extreme4 for $150 less. It'll still more than serve your needs.

Also, the PSU is overkill unless you plan on doing a 3 way or 4 way SLI configuration. A 750 watt PSU will be sufficient for a 2 way SLI configuration.

To answer your question: No, that motherboard will not fit in the Thermaltake case. It doesn't support EATX motherboards. It only has support for microATX and ATX motherboards.

Other than that, everything else looks great. I would probably go for a 7200RPM HDD for faster access to your media files or whatever else you're going to store on there.
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Best solution

December 26, 2012 3:13:39 AM

Like DeusAres said, too much money for useless components. Take this;
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100 92.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($112.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Sony AD-7280S-0B DVD/CD Writer ($18.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1658.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-26 00:13 EST-0500)

You can add a bit to enlarge the storage and add a BD drive. Also you can forget about water cooling and go air cooler, will save you $30.
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December 26, 2012 3:44:34 AM

Thanks DeusAres and ilysaml for your advise.

I initially chose Formula knowing it's a bit oversized (12" x 10.1") compared to standard ATX (12” x 9.6”) since Chaser MK-1 is a huge case among full towers so I might be able to get away with it.

Gigabyte UD5H & AsRock Extreme4 were actually my other alternatives if Formula didn't work out. Funny thing is I just read that Formula doesn't even do quad SLI (thought it's capable of 3-way xfire). Also, after reading quite a few horror stories with Formula's mPCIe module (which, by the way, was one of the main features that I liked), I'll probably go with one of the other two.

By the way, is everyone going by the PSU wattage compiled from pcpartpicker? How accurate is that?
I plugged in conservative estimates into eXtreme Power Supply Calculator Lite and it recommended 1200W.
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December 26, 2012 3:52:20 AM

PSU calculators are not accurate and so ridiculous. Adding a 3rd or 4th card to CF or SLI doesn't add much value. You can go whatever case you want but there's no need to overprice a MOBO or a PSU since there's no benefit.
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December 26, 2012 5:39:51 AM

ForeAllEternity said:
Thanks DeusAres and ilysaml for your advise.

I initially chose Formula knowing it's a bit oversized (12" x 10.1") compared to standard ATX (12” x 9.6”) since Chaser MK-1 is a huge case among full towers so I might be able to get away with it.

Gigabyte UD5H & AsRock Extreme4 were actually my other alternatives if Formula didn't work out. Funny thing is I just read that Formula doesn't even do quad SLI (thought it's capable of 3-way xfire). Also, after reading quite a few horror stories with Formula's mPCIe module (which, by the way, was one of the main features that I liked), I'll probably go with one of the other two.

By the way, is everyone going by the PSU wattage compiled from pcpartpicker? How accurate is that?
I plugged in conservative estimates into eXtreme Power Supply Calculator Lite and it recommended 1200W.

PSU calculators like the one you used and the one on PCpartpicker already overcompensates to create something similar to that of a safeguard. To be honest, you may even be able to get away doing a 2 way SLI/Crossfire configuration with a good quality 650 watt PSU. I don't really pay much mind to PSU calculators. I look at the parts and sort of guesstimate their power draw. And then from there, I tack on extra watts to allow for margin of error. I typically go for 500-550 watts for a single GPU setup (although, sometimes it can be lower depending on the components). For a 2 way configuration, I usually recommend a 750 watt PSU just to be safe.

What you could do is go into the power supply sub-forums and post your question there. Or you can directly ask a moderator. They offer sound advice.
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December 26, 2012 12:16:51 PM

There's no need to ask or post a thread in another section, I can reply on any question.

For 2 GTX 670s, a 650W PSU is very sufficient, but 750W will be great for some headroom and future upgrades.
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December 26, 2012 12:27:08 PM

^+1
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December 26, 2012 1:41:12 PM

Wow, I didn't know 650W is enough for even an SLI setup. But will I be going to be loading the 650W PSU close to 100% if going SLI?

I had a 500W PSU failure about 3 months ago in my current system (which has been on 24/7 for 5 years) and I replaced it with one of these Enthusiast Series™ TX650 V2 — 80 PLUS® Bronze Certified 650 Watt High Performance Power Supply.

Since I'm planning on having the new system with SLI on 24/7 as well, do you guys think I can skip buying a new PSU altogether?



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December 26, 2012 3:14:34 PM

ForeAllEternity said:
Wow, I didn't know 650W is enough for even an SLI setup. But will I be going to be loading the 650W PSU close to 100% if going SLI?

I had a 500W PSU failure about 3 months ago in my current system (which has been on 24/7 for 5 years) and I replaced it with one of these Enthusiast Series™ TX650 V2 — 80 PLUS® Bronze Certified 650 Watt High Performance Power Supply.

Since I'm planning on having the new system with SLI on 24/7 as well, do you guys think I can skip buying a new PSU altogether?

With the standard load of games, your GPUs will draw 300-320W, the other components including a CPU OC won't exceed 300W you're good to go.
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January 1, 2013 11:10:32 PM

Best answer selected by ForeAllEternity.
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