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Software Developer Workstation ~$1,200

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December 27, 2012 7:09:13 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: By mid-January

Budget Range: $1,000-$1,200 (all inclusive: shipping, taxes to California, etc.)

System Usage: Software development (lots of virtual machines, lots of compiling), web surfing (lots of tabs open), some video editing (a few days per month), music production, and no gaming.

Operating System: Windows 7 64-bit Prof'l (I'd run Linux, except I've always had problems with video drivers...so Linux will be running in the VMs)

Overclocking: Minimal.

I already have a couple of monitors (including a new ASUS VS228), a Corsair Force 240GB SSD, and a 2TB Hitachi for media storage.

I'm willing to pay a bit more for a quieter system, hence the platinum PSU. I also am willing to pay a bit more for a system that's easy to put together (it's been a few years since I built my own system and I don't have fond memories).

Here's what I'm thinking of getting (note that the RAM is $69.99 each pair after coupon):

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7750 1GB Video Card ($101.97 @ Newegg)
Case: Silverstone SST-PS07B MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($87.06 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 520W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($155.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1004.94
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-27 16:02 EST-0500)

I've been going round and round on the cases: I want to keep it small, but not so small that it's a pain to build. I was looking at the Corsair Obsidian Series 550D, but that seems a tad large. I also looked at the Cooler Master HAF 912, and I may go with that instead.

Thanks for looking this over!
- Ted

More about : software developer workstation 200

December 27, 2012 7:30:07 PM

Just a headsup, although they are great cases, the Corsair xxxD series are advertised as mid-towers, but are freaking huge mid towers lol. Otherwise your build looks pretty appropriate for your uses.

And if you find your case fans to be loud on whichever case you buy, pick up a couple Noctua fans and swap em out, they are some of the quietest out there and still quite powerful (although slightly more expensive, you pay for the quality).
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January 2, 2013 11:08:05 PM

Quote:
Just a headsup, although they are great cases, the Corsair xxxD series are advertised as mid-towers, but are freaking huge mid towers lol.


Yeah, I noticed. I may actually go with the Fractal Design Define R4 over the CM HAF 912. While it's not a micro-tower, everything I've been reading says that they're a pain to put together. I like the R4 since it seems to be quiet and easily to build a system around.

Thanks,
;ted
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January 4, 2013 12:20:21 PM

Also you may want to just buy 1 16gb set of RAM, there is a chance even identical kits can be incompatible.
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January 4, 2013 5:09:18 PM

Quote:
Also you may want to just buy 1 16gb set of RAM, there is a chance even identical kits can be incompatible.


Good point. I did some research and I've decided to get a single 4x8GB set (e.g., ) instead of two-2x8GB sets for that reason. It sounds like it might have been OK since I'm not pushing the RAM, but the price is pretty much the same, so I may as well play it safe.

Thanks!
;ted
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January 4, 2013 5:34:30 PM

if you don't play game or do any 3d stuff that would use the gpu you can use the HD 4000 graphics on the 3770k. the other consideration would be the 3930k with its 6 cores 12 threads. depending what you program in and how large the project you are compiling is it can make a difference. 6 minutes faster for google chrome in vs2010. you probably wont use 32GB of memory.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-benchmar...
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January 4, 2013 6:31:59 PM

jonjonjon said:
if you don't play game or do any 3d stuff that would use the gpu you can use the HD 4000 graphics on the 3770k. the other consideration would be the 3930k with its 6 cores 12 threads. depending what you program in and how large the project you are compiling is it can make a difference. 6 minutes faster for google chrome in vs2010. you probably wont use 32GB of memory.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-benchmar...


I will be doing some 3D work eventually, but yeah, I may hold off on a discrete graphics card and use the built-in graphics for now. I will want 3 displays, so I'll need a card for that at that point.

The 3930k is out of my price range, and my projects don't tend to be that large (usually less than a minute to build) where it'd make much of a difference.

I already use 24GB on another system, so I definitely see using close to the 32GB for the VMs that I'll be running.

;ted
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January 4, 2013 6:35:29 PM

yea VM's will use a lot of memory. probably one of the only ways you could actually use 32GB and even then you must be running a lot of VM's.
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