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New build computer, worked for a few days, now will not boot.

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  • New Build
  • Computer
  • Boot
  • New Build
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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January 2, 2013 5:11:53 AM

I put together a new build and was able to use it without any problems for the first day. Installed windows, updated, restarted numerous times, etc.

On the second day, the computer would not boot. Hitting the power button made the CPU and video card fans spin momentarily, but nothing further. I took unhooked everything from the motherboard and reconnected them one by one and it seemed to do the trick.

The computer worked fine for the next few days, then I turned it off earlier today and now it's doing the same thing. I tried unplugging and replugging everything back in to no avail. I worked through the suggestions on the post of things to do when computer does not boot. I have checked the standoffs as instructed. I also tried breadboarding the MB, CPU, and 1 stick of ram, same results. I have tried resetting the CMOS. Same results.

Processor: AMD FX-6300 FX-Series Six-Core
RAM: 4Gx2|CORSAIR CMZ8GX3M2A
VGA: MSI|R7850 TWIN FROZR 2GD5/OC
MB: ASROCK|970 EXTREME3
PSU: OCZ|OCZ600MXSP 600W

Computer was not overclocked or anything before.

I am at a loss and I don't know what to do next. Please help!

More about : build computer worked days boot

Best solution

January 2, 2013 6:30:41 PM

Change power supply.

At the same time unplug the motherboard pin connector and inspect with flash light that there are no burns on mobo plug

I had same issue twice, both times it was psu
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January 8, 2013 11:04:17 PM

Best answer selected by hdubs.
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January 8, 2013 11:05:10 PM

gussrtk said:
Change power supply.

At the same time unplug the motherboard pin connector and inspect with flash light that there are no burns on mobo plug

I had same issue twice, both times it was psu



I checked it with a friend's power supply and it worked. Thanks for the tip! I got a replacement PSU and its working now (hopefully it stays working!)
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March 1, 2014 4:39:38 PM

A friend of mine went through 5 Power Supplies in less than a year. At that point, it's not hard to figure out the power Supplies are not the problem, they are the victim. He lived in an old house with aluminum wiring. He also had a refrigerator, home theater amp, a 42 inch LCD TV, and a sub woofer plugged into the same power strip as the computer system. Having all of those items connected to the same breaker is just as bad. Dirty power and/or current starvation is hard on the whole computer. The cleaner the power, the less work the PS filters will have to do, and the longer you equipment will last. Even if you were using a UPS, poor(bad) power like this would be very hard on the first inverter and the power protection. Be mindful of your equipment's input power.

Over working your power supply or one of its rails will also cause premature failure. Use a power supply that will easily supply a sufficient amount of power. And if the power supply has multiple rails, do not overload a rail. Balance the load on the rails.

The minimum power protection I would use on any electronic equipment I really cared about would be a Joule rated surge protector. Power strips and regular surge protectors offer little to no protection. The Joule rated surge protectors clean the power up to some extent, and actually absorbs surges. A regular surge protector cleans nothing and clips the surge spikes.
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March 1, 2014 8:25:20 PM

hdubs said:
gussrtk said:
Change power supply.

At the same time unplug the motherboard pin connector and inspect with flash light that there are no burns on mobo plug

I had same issue twice, both times it was psu



I checked it with a friend's power supply and it worked. Thanks for the tip! I got a replacement PSU and its working now (hopefully it stays working!)


NOTE about checking the power supply: The main board uses a green 5 volt line to keep the computer ready to receive the on or off command. The main board turns the computer on by grounding out this green wire. This green 5 volt line is located on the 20/24 socket ATX power connection. If you wish to check the power supply by its self (stand-alone), bend a paper clip into a U-shape. Unplug the ATX connector from the main board. On that connector, plug one end of the paper clip into the green wire's socket, and the other end into any black wire's socket (ground). Every Black wire comes from the same place; GROUND. To turn the power supply off, just remove the clip. In effect, you are turning the power supply on and off the same way the main board does. As the power supply turns on, its fan will start running. You can now check all of the voltages with a multi-meter (under "no-load" conditions).
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