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Dual boot WINME and WINXP

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January 29, 2002 1:23:03 PM

I have a 20 gig harddisk. I want to have 3 partitions which is c:\ (8gig) d:\ (8gig) and e:\ (4gig).
I want to install winme and winxp in the first 2 drives respectively. How do I do make the 3 partitions and how to install the OS to make it available for dual booting? Is it necessary to have NTFS for the winxp partition or FAT32 is ok? Please help!



Jordan Lee

More about : dual boot winme winxp

January 29, 2002 2:54:56 PM

You must first boot the system with a startup disk to create the primary partition and the extended/logical partitions with the FDISK command. Set the primary partition as active. Reboot. Then install WinME in the first partition. The operating system CD will allow you to format the partition as FAT32. Then format the other partitions as FAT32 from within the GUI by right-clicking on the drive letter in My Computer and selecting Format from the menu, and choosing FAT32 as the file system.

Then, install WinXP in the second partition ... and not as an upgrade. While NTFS is preferable for WinXP, for a dual-boot system, FAT32 all-around is usually the best solution, so that all partitions can be "seen", regardless of the OS. Keep the file system already created in the WinME GUI for all the partitions, and install the OS. After WinXP is installed, a bootloader file will appear after the POST, allowing you to select the operating system.

<A HREF="http://www.angelfire.com/la2/rlpos1/page7.html" target="_new">FDISK</A>

<A HREF="http://www.computerhope.com/sfdisk1.htm" target="_new">FDISK Simulation</A>

<A HREF="http://www.bootdisk.com/" target="_new">Bootdisk.com</A>

<A HREF="http://windows.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=ht..." target="_new">Multibooting with Windows XP</A>

Helpful Notes: If you must delete partitions on a disk, always remove the any extended or logical drives before deleting the primary partition. You also may need to change your boot order to CD-ROM first in the BIOS in order to boot and install with the WinME/WinXP CDs. The BIOS order should be the floppy drive first in order to boot with the floppy startup disk.

Write back if you have additional questions. Ask before you start, if anything is confusing!

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
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<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
January 29, 2002 8:44:35 PM

How do you go about doing a dual boot, with 2 hardrives, 2
40 gig's in this case, one I want 98se and XP on the other.
Is it the same procedure.
Dave

No Stranger Here
Related resources
January 29, 2002 10:27:09 PM

Yes, the procedure is the the same. Create the partitions for both hard drives. Make the primary partition on the first hard drive active, and install Win9SE on that partition, and then install WinXP on the first partition of the slaved drive. I would also suggest that each drive contain two partitions; one for the operating system, and the other for personal files. That would make your system look like this:

Primary hard drive:

C: Operating system
D: Free space

Slave drive:

E: Operating system
F: Free space

G: CD-ROM

Dual-booting with two hard drives is my preference. In case of drive failure, you would still have a bootable system.

If either of you need more specific info ... just ask. And check out this <A HREF="http://www.zdnet.com/community/stories/main/0,9057,2662..." target="_new">link</A>. Although it is in reference to dual-booting with Win2K and another operating system, the information will be very helpful.

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
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<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
February 1, 2002 12:51:52 PM

Is it neccesary to do the partitions, or will it work with-out it on a 2 HDD system. And what will the boot screen look like
Dave

No Stranger Here
February 1, 2002 1:39:24 PM

Ewww... why would you want ME? It's a pretty sorry excuse for an OS. If you absolutely wanted a dual boot (which you shouldn't need)... it would be better to go with Windows 98SE or Windows 2000 on one of the other partitions.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
February 1, 2002 3:18:39 PM

No partitions = a failed installation. At the very least, you must have one partition per drive. A hard drive <i>must</i> be partitioned before it will accept a file system.

Did you see the FDISK simulation link I posted above? That contains pictures of the screens.

If you want the easiest method with two hard drives, with one partition per disk:

Boot up the system with a startup disk.

At the A Prompt (A:\>) type FDISK.
FDISK will automatically choose the first drive on the cable that is jumpered as the Master.

Choose to create a DOS partition.
Choose a Primary DOS partition.
With only one partition on the drive, choose to use the maximum space on the drive.
Reboot.
Again, type FDISK at the prompt. Choose to make the partition active from the menu.

Reboot again. Use FDISK. Change the current disk drive to the second hard drive. Go through the procedure again, but do <i>not</i> make the partition on the second hard drive active.

When finished, take out the floppy startup disk. Change the boot order in your BIOS to CD-ROM first. Boot with the operating system CD. Install Win98SE in the first, active partition on the first hard drive. The CD will will allow you to format the partition during the installation. Any partitions larger than 2GB will automatically be formatted as FAT32. I don't recommend using FAT or FAT16, even if the partition is smaller than 2GB. In this situation, with one partition per drive, and the drive's being 40GB each, that shouldn't matter.

After Win98SE is installed, go to each hard drive letter in My Computer <i>except</i> C: (and anything associated with the CD-ROM.) Right-click, choose Format, and select FAT32 as the file system.

At this point, both hard drives should be partitioned, formatted, and Win98SE installed in C:

As for WinXP ... place the operating system CD in the CD-ROM. From the Start/Run, type setup.exe. Choose to install the OS, but <i>not</i> as an upgrade, and be sure to accept the advanced option to select the partition for the installation. Install the OS on the first partition on the <i>second</i> hard drive. If you wish to use FAT32, keep the file system intact ... otherwise, choose NTFS. You should be aware, though, that any NTFS partitions will not be visible from within WinME.

After the OS is installed, a 30-second bootloader will appear after the POST, allowing you to select the OS you wish to use.

After you are finished, I suggest changing the boot order in the BIOS back to floppy, first.

Please read the information in the links already posted carefully, and you should feel more confident about the procedure. If you follow the steps, there shouldn't be any problems. It's not difficult.

Important Note: I still suggest using at at least two partitions per hard drive, especially with any partitions 32GB or more in size using FAT32. Otherwise, you'll have too much slack space, and the large cluster sizes will be inefficient. You can easily see how to create extended/logical partitions in the FDISK Simulator. Use a percentage (%) when selecting the size of the partition for the fastest results. In your case, two 20GB partitions (50%) per disk would be a good idea.

More?

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
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<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
February 1, 2002 4:12:05 PM

I'm confused , everything you said makes sense but the system i'm using now isn't partitioned, but it's 98se with
fat32. Is that the difference.

No Stranger Here
February 1, 2002 4:51:28 PM

rereading it all, the drive I'm using now is only 6.2 gig
could that be why it's not partitioned.


No Stranger Here
February 1, 2002 5:34:25 PM

That's not possible, friend. Your drive absolutely <i>has</i> to have at least one partition or there wouldn't be a file system on it. And with no file system, there is no way to put data on the drive, including an operating system.

A non-partitioned drive, straight from the factory ... is blank. And you can't install anything on it until the drive is partitioned and formatted with a file system.

<A HREF="http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/file/prog.htm" target="_new">Disk Partitioning & Formatting Programs</A>.

<A HREF="http://fdisk.radified.com/" target="_new">Radified FDISK Guide to Partitioning a Hard Drive</A>

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
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<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
February 1, 2002 5:41:21 PM

Is it possible to have a partition that takes the whole drive . I think I read that in one of those guides you posted.

No Stranger Here
February 1, 2002 6:27:12 PM

Oh, yes. Definitely. During the Primary DOS partition creation, if you choose to use the maximum space available on the drive; that's what you get ... one big partition.

If you say "No" to that, then you are given the opportunity to specify the size of the partition, and create extended and logical partitions with the rest of the free space, which can be given a separate drive letter.

Toejam31

<font color=red>My Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=6847" target="_new"><font color=green>Toejam31's Tantalizing Tantric Toy</font color=green></A>
<font color=red>Second Rig:</font color=red> <A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?rigid=15942" target="_new"><font color=green>Toey's Dynamite DDR Duron</font color=green></A>
____________________________________________________________

<font color=purple>"Procrastination on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part."</font color=purple>
!