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Non--ECC VS. ECC

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January 5, 2002 3:19:04 PM

What is ECC and non-ECC, and whats the difference and what should I get. It will be going into a A7M266 asus. I want
2 X 512 , one at a time. Thanks
Dave

No Stranger Here

More about : ecc ecc

January 7, 2002 1:39:05 PM

ECC memory increases data safety because of a parity check in each byte (a extra bit that tells if the data is corrupted, or not), this slows down the performance a little bit.
If you work with important data or run a server then ECC can be handy, non-ECC memory is the normal type of memory without ECC check used in most PCs.

My case has so many fans that it hovers above the ground :eek:  .
Anonymous
a b } Memory
January 7, 2002 3:46:53 PM

So does it prevent system crashes or just warn you when data is corrupt?
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January 7, 2002 4:41:52 PM

It prevents memory cooruption, don't think it gives a message if it finds any.

My case has so many fans that it hovers above the ground :eek:  .
January 7, 2002 6:34:07 PM

It works like this...

Say if you had a string of numbers...say

10111001 that is 8 bits = 1 byte

Say that "No Change" = a zero bit as a verification and a "Change" = 1. So since there is a 1 than the second is a 0 there is a change. Next from the 0 the third digit is a 1. Hence there is a change = 1. The fourth digit is a 1, so the check bit there is a 0 because there is not a change. This is in essence how it verifies the information. So it builds a set of bits inbetween the digit packs to verify the validity of the information. If it passes the test as it rereads the info it accepts it if not it will correct it.

Hopefully this made sense to you. If you have questions, fire away.

<b>"The events of my life are quite inconsequential.." - Dr. Evil</b> :lol: 
Anonymous
a b } Memory
January 7, 2002 6:56:13 PM

So ECC ram does in fact correct corrupt data (i.e. it does not merely just report that the data is bad)?

I don't understand how the memory can fix data that is found to be corrupt. Once the data in memory is incorrect, how can it know what the correct data should be?

Also, is data corruption somewhat common? Would my computer crash less if I had ECC ram? Do you use ECC ram?

Is it worth the extra few dollars?

Does it really slow your system down much? What do you recommend? What brand, type and speed DDR? What would be reliable?
Anonymous
a b } Memory
January 7, 2002 7:15:41 PM

Is 128MB ECC PC200 (PC2100) DDR 16X72 CL2 ECC DIMM by "Memory Upgrades" any good? Or is it cheap quality. Is it a good deal for $26?

Or is Micron ECC 2100 128mb for $35 better?

Or should I just get Non-ECC and get 128mb Micron for $26 or 256mb for $58?

What brand is better: Micron or Crucial?

I'm confused and I scared prices are going to shoot up really soon. How long do you think it'll be before they start coming down again? Thanks for your help.
April 26, 2009 8:05:56 PM

Quote:
So ECC ram does in fact correct corrupt data (i.e. it does not merely just report that the data is bad)?

I don't understand how the memory can fix data that is found to be corrupt. Once the data in memory is incorrect, how can it know what the correct data should be?

Also, is data corruption somewhat common? Would my computer crash less if I had ECC ram? Do you use ECC ram?

Is it worth the extra few dollars?

Does it really slow your system down much? What do you recommend? What brand, type and speed DDR? What would be reliable?

==================
I don't understand how the memory can fix data that is found to be corrupt. Once the data in memory is incorrect, how can it know what the correct data should be?

ecc requires extra-bits for each byte, and then uses those bits to determine which bit is wrong if there's a parity error...the logic is something like "x number of extra bits allow you to correct y bit errors per byte"
!