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Build Compatiblity

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January 7, 2013 11:03:29 PM

This is my first build and I think everything looks compatible but not completly sure. I'll be using this computer mainly as a workstation for 3d animation and rendering with maya and realflow. I would also like to be able to watch movies and play a few games but mainly just a workstation. I added 2 video cards to the list because I wasnt sure which one would be best for what i need, one is a workstation card and one is a gaming card. I heard some gaming cards work well as a workstation card also? I'm open to suggestions if anyone thinks a better component would be better than something i've listed. Thanks for the help.

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx...

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January 7, 2013 11:11:59 PM

Everything's compatible. but you'll want a workstation card and not a gaming card.

being a workstation computer, you'll probably want more ram... 16 gigs at least...

Gaming cards use to be able to become workstation cards (because they use to just have different drivers and firmware that could be flashed) but now they're designed different than gaming cards so they're a good bit better than gaming cards at doing actual work. But they're terrible at gaming.
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January 8, 2013 2:40:27 AM

killerhurtalot said:
Everything's compatible. but you'll want a workstation card and not a gaming card.

being a workstation computer, you'll probably want more ram... 16 gigs at least...

Gaming cards use to be able to become workstation cards (because they use to just have different drivers and firmware that could be flashed) but now they're designed different than gaming cards so they're a good bit better than gaming cards at doing actual work. But they're terrible at gaming.




Alright thanks. Do you think that firepro v4800 is any good or can you think of a better one around $200.
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January 9, 2013 12:59:52 AM

A workstation card isn't terrible at gaming, it is just a much higher price for low specs. A high end rig like this is incomplete without a ssd especially a workstation. I'd suggest going with a cheaper hdd and getting a case with usb 3.0. Also a 4x4gb kit is cheaper than 2x2x4gb but a 2x8gb is even cheaper than that. You never stated a budget but this is what I'd suggest around the same price.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P9X79 LE ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($233.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Intel 330 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black/Orange) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1658.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-08 21:57 EST-0500)
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January 10, 2013 6:34:12 PM

k1114 said:
A workstation card isn't terrible at gaming, it is just a much higher price for low specs. A high end rig like this is incomplete without a ssd especially a workstation. I'd suggest going with a cheaper hdd and getting a case with usb 3.0. Also a 4x4gb kit is cheaper than 2x2x4gb but a 2x8gb is even cheaper than that. You never stated a budget but this is what I'd suggest around the same price.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P9X79 LE ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($233.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Intel 330 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black/Orange) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1658.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-08 21:57 EST-0500)


What reasons would i need an ssd? I hear some people talk about storing the OS on it so it boots up faster but as a desktop computer i dont plan on turning it off very often anyway. and also maya and realflow use up a ton of space so i wouldnt be able to put any of that on there either. I'm just curious because i see a lot of people talking about ssd. Thanks for your help.
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January 10, 2013 6:55:05 PM

Do you never close maya or realflow? I know maya takes forever to start up with a large project. It's not just startup that is faster. Everything on the ssd is "snappier" as the access times are 100x+ faster than a hdd. I don't know what you are doing but when I render from a hdd it takes a couple minutes before it can even start rendering because it has to collect so many files. A ssd is near instant. You could probably only fit your working files on it but it speeds up the workflow tremendously. Maya itself is <1.5gb and I've never had a project go above 20gb so 120gb should be fine.
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