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Canon Rebel XT or Nikon?

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July 15, 2005 7:51:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.

But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.

Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
better with accurate color representation - is that true?

And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
be unusually good.

TIA

Louise

More about : canon rebel nikon

Anonymous
July 15, 2005 7:51:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Louise" <none@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com...
>I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
> getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.
>
> But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
> Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.
>
> Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
> better with accurate color representation - is that true?
>
> And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
> be unusually good.
>
> TIA
>
> Louise

Try the Nikon D70, a smaller and lighter camera.
"Geniuscamera," huh? Check:
http://www.resellerratings.com/seller8519.html
User rating of 0.59 out of a possible 10? Looks like there's an
undercurrent of customer dissatisfaction. Probably best to avoid it...

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 7:51:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Louise" <none@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com...
>I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
> getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.
>
> But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
> Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.
>
> Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
> better with accurate color representation - is that true?
>
> And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
> be unusually good.
>
> TIA
>
> Louise

I'd forget the D100 and look at the D70(s). Since you already have some
Nikon lenses it seems kind off nuts to make the switch, IMO.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 7:51:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com>,
Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:
>I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
>getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.
>
>But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
>Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.

The D100 is one being phased out to make room for its
replacement. When I compared the D100 and the D70 last year, I decided
that the D70 offered a lot more for what I wanted a camera for. (I also
already had a collection of Nikon "glass'.)

However, I don't know the 6006. Is it one with autofocus, and
CPU contacts for the lenses?

Looking through some eBay auctions, it is clear that it does
have Autofocus, and it *may* have CPU contacts as well. (I think that I
see them reflected in the mirror of two shots of the 6006 without a lens
mounted).

If it *does* have the CPU contacts, and if your lenses have them
too, then you can use the lenses with full TTL metering. If the lenses
do not have CPU contacts, you will be limited to manual exposure
setting, as the metering system will not work with the D70. or D50.

>Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
>better with accurate color representation - is that true?

I think that the color representation is going to be a function
of the user, and any after processing in the user's computer after
exposure. There are lots of things to tweak, some in the camera, and
some in post processing. I would expect either camera to take good
photos. And each has strengths and weaknesses relative to the other.

Note that *all* digital SLRs tend to expose for slightly darker
images than you would get from film. This, is, in part, because
overexposed (blown) highlights are just plain lost in digital form,
while (if you shoot in RAW mode, you can recover a lot more information
from the shadow side of things. You can boost the brightness in the
camera by adjusting the exposure compensation, and the camera's display
will tell you (by blinking any "blown" highlights between white and
black) if you need to back off on the exposure. It will also display a
histogram, to let you judge the balance of the exposure before you walk
away from that shot, rather than discovering the problems when you get
the developed film back.

You can also boost the brightness in the computer, and even
adjust the gamma curve to squeeze more information in the bright end of
the image if you so desire.

I would not try comparing the D100 to the Cannon, but I would
consider the Nikon D70s (the replacement for the D70) to be an excellent
choice, and if you want one even smaller and lighter, you could consider
the D50, though I was amazed at how much darker the viewfinder is
compared to the D70. So -- if you want to use it in low light
conditions, the D70s is the preferred choice between those two.

Go to a photo store, and see whether *your* lenses feel right
with either of those cameras.

Another consideration is to ask what are the focal length ranges
on those zooms? (And, are they Nikon glass, or ones by some other
company to fit the Nikon mount?) In particular, the D70s comes (in the
"kit" form) with an excellent 18-70mm zoom lens. (Note that, like most
digital SLRs, the camera's sensor does not occupy the same space that
the film frame does, so the "effective" focal length (what you will get
in your frame) differs from the *real* focal length. The 18mm end of
the zoom range on the "kit" lens is the same as a 27mm lens on a 35mm
film camera. At the 70mm end, the effective focal length is 105mm. The
digital Nikons have a 1.5 "crop factor" (multiply the real focal length
by 1.5 to see what the effective coverage will be).

If you don't need the wide angle end of the range, your existing
lenses should be good enough (if they have CPU contacts), and you can
get the body only. I did that, with a 28-105mm f3.5-4.5 D in hand, but
I am now missing the wide angle range, and am waiting for the store to
get a separate 18-70mm lens in stock for me to add to my collection.

For comparison, the Cannon Rebel XT has a crop factor of 1.6, so
you need even wider lenses to get the same coverage. (And -- it won't
conveniently use the lenses which you already have -- though they can be
made to work -- sort of -- on the camera with an adaptor.) No -- there
are no adaptors working in the other direction, to use Cannon lenses on
Nikons. :-)

There are reports from some that the Cannon Rebel XT feels *too*
small and light to some, though you might disagree.

>And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
>be unusually good.

The basic principle is that if the prices seem too good to be
true, they probably are.

And -- other followups have pointed to the web site which ranks
the camera vendors, and what they have posted suggests that you are
better off not even considering dealing with this vendor. Go to the web
site that they posted, read the reports on Geniuscameras.com, and then
bookmark the site if you are planning to do mail order purchases in the
future. In general, B&H and Adorama seem to get fairly good reports,
but they don't offer "too good to be true" prices, either. :-)

Good Luck,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 8:11:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

D70s, D50.

"Louise" <none@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com...
>I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
> getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.
>
> But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
> Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.
>
> Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
> better with accurate color representation - is that true?
>
> And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
> be unusually good.
>
> TIA
>
> Louise
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 8:23:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:

> But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
> Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.
>
> Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras?

Matter of preference or brand choice (having Nikon lenses makes Nikon the
obvious choice). But the D100 is old; look at the D70s, that's the one to
compare with the Canon.

> I have heard that Canon does better with accurate color representation -
> is that true?

No.

> And....has anyone dealt with Geniuscameras.com - their prices appear to
> be unusually good.

It would be an unusually good idea to stay far away from them. Never, ever
price-shop camera stuff on the Internet; there are hundreds of scam places.
Just go to http://www.bhphotovideo.com/ and be happy.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
July 15, 2005 1:50:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>
>> I have heard that Canon does better with accurate color representation -
>> is that true?
>
> No.

to quote "What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 who compared sensors -

"The CCD of the Nikon (D70) was the biggest suprise, producing the worst
test chart of all the sensors. The level of difference, especially
considering Nikons 3D matrix metering which is supposed to allow for colour
in exposures, is staggering. But maybe the problem is caused by the 3D
metering ".

" The Nikon CCD struggles to reproduce many of the colours of the Gretag
Macbeth chart. yellows, orange and grenns are washed out and the light skin
tone patch is very weak indeed. The Blue flower and bluish green are aslo
weak".

"The Canon (20D) sensor produces good neutral grays and whites. The colour
patches on the Gretag Macbeth colour chart are reproduced accurately, though
red and moderate red patches are slightly light.. The yellow too is a little
on the light side. Skintones reproduce very well and blues are particularly
accurate."

The winner was Fuji..
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 1:50:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"dylan" <no@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:D b7tcv$r94$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
>
>>
>>> I have heard that Canon does better with accurate color representation -
>>> is that true?
>>
>> No.
>
> to quote "What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 who compared
> sensors -
>
> "The CCD of the Nikon (D70) was the biggest suprise, producing the worst
> test chart of all the sensors. The level of difference, especially
> considering Nikons 3D matrix metering which is supposed to allow for
> colour in exposures, is staggering. But maybe the problem is caused by the
> 3D metering ".
>
> " The Nikon CCD struggles to reproduce many of the colours of the Gretag
> Macbeth chart. yellows, orange and grenns are washed out and the light
> skin tone patch is very weak indeed. The Blue flower and bluish green are
> aslo weak".
>
> "The Canon (20D) sensor produces good neutral grays and whites. The colour
> patches on the Gretag Macbeth colour chart are reproduced accurately,
> though red and moderate red patches are slightly light.. The yellow too is
> a little on the light side. Skintones reproduce very well and blues are
> particularly accurate."
>
> The winner was Fuji..
>

Which magazine was that? Can you post a link? That review disagrees with
just about every review I have every read about the Nikon bodies.

Tom
July 15, 2005 3:08:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

">>
>
> Which magazine was that? Can you post a link? That review disagrees with
> just about every review I have every read about the Nikon bodies.
>
> Tom
>
>


"What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 - battle of the sensors.
July 15, 2005 3:08:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"dylan" <no@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:D b81vd$uma$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
> ">>
>>
>> Which magazine was that? Can you post a link? That review disagrees
>> with just about every review I have every read about the Nikon bodies.
>>
>> Tom
>>
>>
>
>
> "What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 - battle of the sensors.
>

What is the name of the magazine? "What digital camera?" "UK magazine"
Never heard of either.
Was it a photo magazine? Please provide a link as it contradicts everything
I've read also...what
you posted sounds like you're giving the article title and saying that it
was some magazine published
in the UK. A link would be really helpful...
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 3:08:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

george wrote:
> "dylan" <no@nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:D b81vd$uma$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
>>">>
>>
>>>Which magazine was that? Can you post a link? That review disagrees
>>>with just about every review I have every read about the Nikon bodies.
>>>
>>>Tom
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>"What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 - battle of the sensors.
>>
>
>
> What is the name of the magazine? "What digital camera?" "UK magazine"
> Never heard of either.
> Was it a photo magazine? Please provide a link as it contradicts everything
> I've read also...what
> you posted sounds like you're giving the article title and saying that it
> was some magazine published
> in the UK. A link would be really helpful...

Ten seconds in Google got me this: http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/
July 15, 2005 4:28:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <db7g5g$ap1$1@Fuego.d-and-d.com>, dnichols@d-and-d.com
says...
> In article <MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com>,
> Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:
> >I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
> >getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.
> >
> >But the Nikon D100 feels very heavy and bulky in my (small) hands. The
> >Canon Rebel XT feels a lot more comfortable to hold.
>
> The D100 is one being phased out to make room for its
> replacement. When I compared the D100 and the D70 last year, I decided
> that the D70 offered a lot more for what I wanted a camera for. (I also
> already had a collection of Nikon "glass'.)
>
> However, I don't know the 6006. Is it one with autofocus, and
> CPU contacts for the lenses?
>
> Looking through some eBay auctions, it is clear that it does
> have Autofocus, and it *may* have CPU contacts as well. (I think that I
> see them reflected in the mirror of two shots of the 6006 without a lens
> mounted).
>
> If it *does* have the CPU contacts, and if your lenses have them
> too, then you can use the lenses with full TTL metering. If the lenses
> do not have CPU contacts, you will be limited to manual exposure
> setting, as the metering system will not work with the D70. or D50.
>
> >Any thoughts on comparing the two cameras? I have heard that Canon does
> >better with accurate color representation - is that true?
>
> I think that the color representation is going to be a function
> of the user, and any after processing in the user's computer after
> exposure. There are lots of things to tweak, some in the camera, and
> some in post processing. I would expect either camera to take good
> photos. And each has strengths and weaknesses relative to the other.
>
> Note that *all* digital SLRs tend to expose for slightly darker
> images than you would get from film. This, is, in part, because
> overexposed (blown) highlights are just plain lost in digital form,
> while (if you shoot in RAW mode, you can recover a lot more information
> from the shadow side of things. You can boost the brightness in the
> camera by adjusting the exposure compensation, and the camera's display
> will tell you (by blinking any "blown" highlights between white and
> black) if you need to back off on the exposure. It will also display a
> histogram, to let you judge the balance of the exposure before you walk
> away from that shot, rather than discovering the problems when you get
> the developed film back.
>
> You can also boost the brightness in the computer, and even
> adjust the gamma curve to squeeze more information in the bright end of
> the image if you so desire.
It is definitely autofocus. HOW WOULD I RECOGNIZE THE NECESSARY CPU
CONTACTS on the lens? Being able to use it ttl is, of course, quite
important.

TIA

Louise
July 15, 2005 8:22:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"george" <nowhere@newsonly.com> wrote in message
news:uUOBe.6478$1Y1.5880@fe02.lga...
>
> "dylan" <no@nowhere.com> wrote in message
> news:D b81vd$uma$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>>
>> ">>
>>>
>>> Which magazine was that? Can you post a link? That review disagrees
>>> with just about every review I have every read about the Nikon bodies.
>>>
>>> Tom
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> "What digital camera" UK magazine June 2005 - battle of the sensors.
>>
>
> What is the name of the magazine? "What digital camera?" "UK magazine"
> Never heard of either.
> Was it a photo magazine? Please provide a link as it contradicts
> everything I've read also...what
> you posted sounds like you're giving the article title and saying that it
> was some magazine published
> in the UK. A link would be really helpful...

It's a UK magazine called "What Digital Camera"

http://www.whatdigitalcamera.co.uk/

I don't believe the article is on the site.
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 9:52:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <MPG.1d417859fed08d069898a7@news-server.nyc.rr.com>,
Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:
>In article <db7g5g$ap1$1@Fuego.d-and-d.com>, dnichols@d-and-d.com
>says...
>> In article <MPG.1d40ff342d04df5b9898a6@news-server.nyc.rr.com>,
>> Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:
>> >I own a Nikon 6006 slr with two good Nikkor zoom lenses. Therefore, if
>> >getting a digial slr, Nikon would seem to be the way to go.

[ ... ]

>> If it *does* have the CPU contacts, and if your lenses have them
>> too, then you can use the lenses with full TTL metering. If the lenses
>> do not have CPU contacts, you will be limited to manual exposure
>> setting, as the metering system will not work with the D70. or D50.

[ ... ]

>It is definitely autofocus. HOW WOULD I RECOGNIZE THE NECESSARY CPU
>CONTACTS on the lens? Being able to use it ttl is, of course, quite
>important.

As you remove the lens, the contacts are visible as an arc of
metallic projections around the area just inside the area which lines up
with the white dot as the lens is lifted clear. They are in an arc of
black plastic insulator, and are on the top when the lens is rotated to
lock in place. They are just behind the metal of the mount on the lens
which engages the camera body's lens mount.

If there are no electrical contacts on the lens or inside the
camera body just behind the lens mount, then things become questionable.

Someone else has already posted that you do have them on your
lenses. I don't know what lenses you have, (or by whom, as sometimes
Nikon cameras are sold bundled with lenses by other makers), and without
having any experience with your specific camera, I had to warn you of
the possibility. I know that quite a few of my older lenses do not have
the CPU contacts, so I have to use them in manual mode.

Looking back, I do see that you said "Nikkor lenses", so that is
part of the information covered.

Good luck,
Don.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 10:57:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

dylan <no@nowhere.com> wrote:

> " The Nikon CCD struggles to reproduce many of the colours of the Gretag
> Macbeth chart. yellows, orange and grenns are washed out and the light skin
> tone patch is very weak indeed. The Blue flower and bluish green are aslo
> weak".

Operator error is my bet. That's total nonsense.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 10:58:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Louise <none@nospam.com> wrote:

> It is definitely autofocus. HOW WOULD I RECOGNIZE THE NECESSARY CPU
> CONTACTS on the lens? Being able to use it ttl is, of course, quite
> important.

Your AF lenses are CPU lenses. They will work.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
July 16, 2005 2:17:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

DoN. Nichols <dnichols@d-and-d.com> wrote:

> Someone else has already posted that you do have them on your
> lenses. I don't know what lenses you have, (or by whom, as sometimes
> Nikon cameras are sold bundled with lenses by other makers), and without
> having any experience with your specific camera, I had to warn you of
> the possibility. I know that quite a few of my older lenses do not have
> the CPU contacts, so I have to use them in manual mode.
>
> Looking back, I do see that you said "Nikkor lenses", so that is
> part of the information covered.

The 6006 is an autofocus camera. All Nikon AF lenses are CPU lenses, so
assuming he has AF lenses, he has no problem.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
July 16, 2005 10:31:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Tom,

Did you get the review ?
!