Best for an expensive ips - 2560 or 1920 for 1280 interpolated resolut

Hello,
I'm looking to buy an expensive 1500$ ips monitor and before I will spend all that cash, I wanna make sure I choose the right monitor.

I know the interpolated res are bad, but I'm creating 3d worlds like these

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aPaggnRB4Xc/Tt3oqO5FT8I/AAAAAAAAAQU/RyvUphprO2A/s400/flipped_1920_effects_v2.jpg
1920 res : http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/3804/flipped1920effectsv2.jpg

and I'm forced to use a lower res, plus I hate the small letters and buttons you get with higher res.

So my question is which monitor will provide the sharper 1280 res. A 2560 resolution one or the 1920 one ?
You should also keep in mind that with a 2560 you will have much smaller pixels, so it's possible the quality will be higher even with an interpolation. And the most important fact - with a 2560 you can have an exactly half smaller res which is supposed to be the best when we talk about re-size and zooming.
5 answers Last reply
More about best expensive 2560 1920 1280 interpolated resolut
  1. You do know that you can adjust scaling right? Since windows XP you can adjust scaling options which make text/buttons/words bigger on the screen depending on what you set it too.

    Basically I would recommend a 2560 x 1600 display or a 2560 x 1440 display depending on if you want 16:10 or 16:9
  2. Yes, I know, but most software makers like Autodesk and so on give the advice to not touch the dpi and keep the defaults or you get errors like truncated menus and buttons and others.

    So you would say a higher resolution display would give a better sharper 1280 res ?

    It would be nice if someone with such a display would test if an exact half res would give a better quality than a 1360 or something res.
  3. Unfortunately quite often the 'exactly half res' is not show as such but the scaling engine just tries to scale it the same as other resolutions and fails miserably. So the end result is not as sharp as it should be.

    However i would think that a 2560x1600 monitor for the actual work and then having a secondary monitor, possibly with the target resolution you want to do tests on might be your optimal solution.
  4. Thank you rvilkman. So did you test the 1280 vs a similar but non half res on a big 2560 monitor ? And the quality was equally blurry ?

    And also I noticed something. Normally the sharpness function on native resolution give a "too much sharp" feeling and defects. But on interpolated res it is different. And actually makes the image more similar to a native resolution. Anyone experimented with this ?
  5. This is why sometimes I prefer a lower native resolution monitor because I like to work at lower resolutions for bigger text and buttons. The interpolated resolutions on high native displays are blurry and cause eyestrain. I work on a 32 inch 1366 TV even though people recommend 1080 P. I sit far away and I know 1366 looks sharpest to me.

    ezio LCDs do good text sharpening at lower resolutions from what I've read on forums like hardforum. Ideally there is some Windows or Linux software that can accomplish this. Hint hint developers
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