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Just Built a New PC

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January 13, 2013 6:05:14 PM

Hey guys,

The last time I built a PC was over 7 years ago. I have recently decided to build a new gaming PC, and I have realized there is so much new jargon! I have a few questions I would like to ask before I assemble and install everything, to make sure that I am getting the best optimization for my new rig. I have done some reading online, but I still have some questions that are still unanswered.

My system specs are:
Antec p280 Case
4x Bitfenix Spectre 120mm Case Fans
Asus Sabertooth Z77
I5 3570k 3.4ghz
Hyper 212+
16 gb (2x 8gb) G.Skill Ripjaws
Crucial M4 128gb SSD
1TB Western Digital Caviar Black
Gigabyte Radeon 7870 OC 1100 mhz 2gb
Corsair HX750 PSU
Windows 7 Ultimate (x64) sp1

My questions are:
1) How do my parts look? Am I missing anything?

2) The Sabertooth runs on UEFI bios, so how should I set my SDD and HDD in terms of GPT or MBR? Which one will run better? I have read that I only need GPT only if my drives exceed 2tb, but are there any other benefits to GPT?

3) Before I install Windows, do I need to update all of my drivers first (motherboard, SSD)? Or do I do all of this after I install windows?

4) I plan on booting Windows on my SSD, I have read that I need to first 1) turn on AHCI 2) disconnect every other SSD + HDD before I install Windows; is there anything else I need to do ahead to optimize the speed in which the SSD runs/boots?

Thanks guys, if there is anything else I should know that I didn't ask a question for, please let me know!

More about : built

January 13, 2013 6:20:42 PM

You will need a Good power supply and a optical drive keyboard and mouse and monitor. Good power supplies can be researched at hardwaresecrets.com
Intall drivers after operating system install, otherwise everything else is alright.
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January 13, 2013 6:29:47 PM

oops i forgot i got a corsair hx750. Will that suffice? Thanks for your reply knightdog :) 
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January 13, 2013 7:11:02 PM

Tums said:
oops i forgot i got a corsair hx750. Will that suffice? Thanks for your reply knightdog :) 

A 750w PSU will work great if you are not going to put in an other GPU and overclock them more.
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January 13, 2013 9:31:07 PM

mariuslol1 said:
A 750w PSU will work great if you are not going to put in an other GPU and overclock them more.


I dont plan on adding another video card, but in the future i do plan on overclocking my cpu to 4.0-4.5 ghz, and my videocard up to around 1200-1250 mhz. will 750 watts still be enough for a PSU?
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January 14, 2013 1:54:19 AM

actually a Corsair 650W unit can power an OC'd cpu and 2 680's in sli. your rig doesn't need anywhere near 750W :D 
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January 14, 2013 2:04:37 AM

Hard Line said:
actually a Corsair 650W unit can power an OC'd cpu and 2 680's in sli. your rig doesn't need anywhere near 750W :D 


oh wow lol thats good news i guess! thanks :) 

also, you wouldnt by any chance know whether or not i should go GPT or MBR for my SSD and HDD?
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Best solution

January 14, 2013 2:54:23 PM

Perhaps one of the biggest pitfalls of MBR-based disks is their potential for corruption of the partition table, a region on the disk that maps sectors to logical block numbers. MBR disks only have 1 partition table to keep track of all the blocks in the partition. If the table becomes corrupt, the entire disk must be recovered from backup. Windows GPT-based disks have multiple, redundant partition tables so that if one is detected as being corrupt, it can self-heal itself from a redundant copy of the table.

Despite the many advantages of GPT-based disks over MBR drives, many vendors still utilize the MBR technology since it is still predominantly used in the real world. GPT disks are gaining popularity with their benefits in terms of partition size, number of partitions, and resilience. Windows Failover Clusters now support GPT-based disks which will broaden their use in enterprise data centers. See related article on Failover Cluster Setup. So while bigger isn’t always better, the many advantages of GPT-based drives make them an attractive alternative.

MBR max partition size = 2TB GPT = 18EB ( 1k TB )
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January 14, 2013 8:42:28 PM

Hard Line said:
Perhaps one of the biggest pitfalls of MBR-based disks is their potential for corruption of the partition table, a region on the disk that maps sectors to logical block numbers. MBR disks only have 1 partition table to keep track of all the blocks in the partition. If the table becomes corrupt, the entire disk must be recovered from backup. Windows GPT-based disks have multiple, redundant partition tables so that if one is detected as being corrupt, it can self-heal itself from a redundant copy of the table.

Despite the many advantages of GPT-based disks over MBR drives, many vendors still utilize the MBR technology since it is still predominantly used in the real world. GPT disks are gaining popularity with their benefits in terms of partition size, number of partitions, and resilience. Windows Failover Clusters now support GPT-based disks which will broaden their use in enterprise data centers. See related article on Failover Cluster Setup. So while bigger isn’t always better, the many advantages of GPT-based drives make them an attractive alternative.

MBR max partition size = 2TB GPT = 18EB ( 1k TB )


I guess the best solution would be to go MBR for now, and then when GPT gets more and more widespread, I can switch over. Thanks
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January 14, 2013 8:42:34 PM

Best answer selected by Tums.
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January 15, 2013 12:31:13 AM

Thank you. you do gain redundancy in using GPT so keep that in mind as well :D 
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