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Crossfire 7970s

Recently bought a Sapphire 7970, and even more recently decided I wanted a second. Here is the one I currently have:

SAPPHIRE 21197-00-40G Radeon HD 7970

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102961

Unfortunately as you can see, it is now discontinued, and this appears to be the newer model:

SAPPHIRE 100351SR Radeon HD 7970

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008


Haven't run a Crossfire setup in years, and just curious if I will run into issues if I run these two together in tandem.

Thanks
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about crossfire 7970s
  1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127645

    Since you have a reference card. another just like it might be the better option. When you mix a OC card with a reference clock card... things can be off a bit
  2. Good to know, I assume then that this one would also work:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161412
  3. It will work but at the lower speed of those card, choose the cheapest (i'd go for the sapphire on the first link, the new one, its 359.99$).
  4. djangoringo said:
    It will work but at the lower speed of those card, choose the cheapest (i'd go for the sapphire on the first link, the new one, its 359.99$).

    Why must everyone think that having a fast card in your stack of cards in the best option. Your already gonna have a boost in performance from CF. why not go with a card thats clocked the same. so both cards are on the same page.
  5. One thing to keep in mind when crossfiring is that you now have 2 cards in your case (duh). This also means you have twice as much heat output from your video card(s) as you did before. If you don't have a well ventilated case (or watercooling I suppose) you might want to consider a card that's going to blow air out of the back of your case rather than into it.
  6. Rockdpm said:
    Why must everyone think that having a fast card in your stack of cards in the best option. Your already gonna have a boost in performance from CF. why not go with a card thats clocked the same. so both cards are on the same page.



    Why pay more 50$ for a stock reference card with a stock cooler ? makes no sense the 7970 sapphire is at 359.99$ and for me it is the best brand and has a custom dual fan cooling which (nevermind the clock speeds) will be better on a crossfire setup vs stock cooler, cause it will generate less heat.
    Also the HIS at 349.99$ will be a good choice, i just prefer the sapphire brand.
  7. Spaniard United said:
    One thing to keep in mind when crossfiring is that you now have 2 cards in your case (duh). This also means you have twice as much heat output from your video card(s) as you did before. If you don't have a well ventilated case (or watercooling I suppose) you might want to consider a card that's going to blow air out of the back of your case rather than into it.

    Another good point. Great Scholar
  8. djangoringo said:
    Why pay more 50$ for a stock reference card with a stock cooler ? makes no sense the 7970 sapphire is at 359.99$ and for me it is the best brand and has a custom dual fan cooling which (nevermind the clock speeds) will be better on a crossfire setup vs stock cooler, cause it will generate less heat.
    Also the HIS at 349.99$ will be a good choice, i just prefer the sapphire brand.

    You mean...This one:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161399
  9. You know, What you see is Dual fans and higher clock speeds... thats all anyone thinks about.. When your going DUAL GPU. its best to have the same exact graphics card so they will be the SAME EXACT FREQUENCY> and besides blower style fans are better for case heat. all dual fans do is recycle air from the case so the only time the GPU is cool is when its idle. but that hot case air that is left behind must be extracted from case fans rather than imediately exhausted outside the case
  10. There will be no problems with higher frequencies, it will just lower clock speeds of the two, why pay 50 $ more for a stock cooler and same frequency if there ain't no problem with those two mentioned and i have to disagree if you say that a stock cooler beats the cooling system of these two...single or crossfire.
  11. What ever dude.... I think you need to read up on Cooling and Thermal design some time... It would help explain what I'm getting at
  12. Best answer
    To answer the OP, basically any 7970 will work for crossfire. It's better if they have the same clock/mem speeds, but go with what you like.

    Most graphics cards have fans that blow the heat away from the card and into the case. With one graphics card in the case, ambient temperatures can be easily lowered with case fans. Adding another graphics cards adds two problems:

    1. First card blows hot air on the back of second card = bad
    2. First and Second card are both blowing hot air into the case, raising the ambient temperature and forcing your coolers to work harder to keep up, if they can.

    This is the point, or rather part of the point, that I believe Rockdpm was trying to make. Ambient heat raises the temperature of all components and when you've got two video cards blowing their heat, you either need it vented out immediately or have superb airflow through the case to properly vent the additional heat.
  13. Thanks all.

    Went with:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006O714FI/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00


    I have like 11 fans in my case (Antec 1200) and a liquid system. I should be ok I think. Appreciate the tips.
  14. Best answer selected by axxidental.
  15. So your from uk, well that settles it.
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