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Im making a computer

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January 13, 2013 6:48:26 PM

Hi community!

Well, im making a gaming computer (i will use it for work and other stuff but principally gaming) and i've been searching for good and cheap components, and i got a few questions. I dont want it to be BIG or small so i want a Mid size

1. Whick components are needed, i am searching for:
RAM, Power Supply, Motherboard, Processor, Graphics Card, Network Card, Hard Drive, DVD reader and the Case (mid size)
Am i forgetting a component? If i do, Which?

2. Do cases come with integrated DVD reader, im looking for this Mid case
http://www.amazon.com/CM-Storm-Scout-Computer-SGC-2000-...

3. If i want a GAMING computer in what component should i spend more money?

Well those are my questions by now, im starting the project now in January so i can finish it and buy all the stuff on August 2013 (8 month project), i have a lot of time and i dont want to have any doubt of what im doing.
If i have another question i'll tell you ;) 

Thanks btw


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January 13, 2013 6:55:44 PM

I advise everyone in your situation not to spend big money on their first build. If you don't have building experience, build a machine out of the cheapest parts you can find. My first build cost $150. Make your mistakes on the dummy machine. You will be a lot happier with the end result of the real build.

And if your still asking what parts to buy on a forum, you really don't have enough experience and knowledge to do a build properly. Experiment and learn on the cheap. Do lots of reading and research.
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a b 4 Gaming
January 13, 2013 7:06:09 PM

We have a wealth of information and knowledgeable users on this site. What I always prefer people do is to read and read and then read some more so that instead of being told the answers you now know them and can take that with you through out life. That being said there always comes times where you will need to ask for help that is what we are here for. Here are some great places to start reading. If you need a hand after reading feel free to ask.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-g...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-your-own-pc,2...
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a b 4 Gaming
January 13, 2013 7:36:42 PM

CMI86 and FALC0N are spot on in their advice, I thought I'd throw in a couple of bits though.

8 months is a long time to build a computer over. If you have all the components, setting up a new PC typically takes an afternoon depending on your experience and the components you are using. While there is no harm in taking your time, there are a couple of issues with a staggered build-

* If it's for budget reasons, anything you buy now which won't be used for months is a waste of money. Generally speaking, things get cheaper. $500 spent in August will likely get you a significant amount more than $500 spent now.

* Tech companies constantly push out new products. There is nothing wrong with slightly older tech, it still works absolutely fine, but the launches of new products (especially graphics cards) pushes down the prices of all the competition and can lead to great deals. Big launches to be aware of in the coming months include a new graphics card lineup from AMD (8000series) and Intel Haswell series processors.

As for asking for help, it's good to have an idea of what you want to spend, or what you "need" to.
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January 13, 2013 8:55:13 PM

Thanks, first of all, you respond VERY fast guys, congrats! But can u answer my questions?
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January 13, 2013 9:02:20 PM
a b 4 Gaming
January 13, 2013 9:55:39 PM

Watch the newegg how to videos on youtube.

Good first shot at a build. Do you have a microcenter near where u live? I'd spend about $140 max on mobo (extreme4). Are u going to overclock? If so u need a cheap aftermarket cooler ($35), if not can save money with a 3470 instead.

Wouldn't game wirelessly unless there's no other option.

Agree with all that it's better to save the money til the end and buy all at once. Intel, nvidia, and amd are all releasing new products between now and then that should allow you to get more bang for the buck.
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January 13, 2013 10:24:37 PM

1. if you ever want to find out how to build a pc, best way, is to pick up any old PC that you have in your house, really old ones (the ones that are probably sitting there gathering dust) that cannot play anything. and take it apart :) ...then put it back together again :) .

2. Your build: you can use 1333MHz RAM instead as there isn't noticeable difference at 1600MHz, gaming is mainly affected by the graphics card and processor performance.

possibly consider using a second gen i3 or i5 if you really want intel, e.g. i3 2100 or i5 2500k top notch processors which save a good few bucks (they use the same motherboard as listed so its ok)

GTX650Ti is a good card, can't go wrong, if still looking to save money you can bump that down a bit. any HD radeon 6xxx/7xxx or gtx260, gtx460 etc. are good cards which will play nearly all currently released games at ultra high.

3. network card is up to you, i prefer to use a USB adapter which you can buy for less than $15
(http://www.amazon.com/Laptone-Wireless-Adapter-Network-...)

4. whatever you do, get windows 7 :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
January 13, 2013 11:28:21 PM

There's nothing wrong with the components you have selected as such, but there are a few idiosyncrasies which you should perhaps consider.

As I previously mentioned, prices are moving goalposts so a good value build now is not likely to be a good value build in August.
The following 3 items, Processor/Motherboard/Graphics card are the most expensive bits and also the most likely to shift in terms of value/performance. All of the info below is fine for buying a PC today but entirely irrelevant in a few months.

Processor The 3570K is great, and you have a Z77 motherboard chosen which means you can overclock it. To do this however, you really need a decent CPU cooler. Common recommendations are the 212 Hyper Evo and Noctua NH-D14 at low and higher ends of the budget respectively. While overclocking isn't especially complicated, if this is your first build you might want to consider saving some cash here and shifting it over to other components.
Selecting an 3450/3470 i5, dropping the (potentially expensive) cooler, and downgrading your motherboard to H77 or B75 chipset will potentially save you $100-150 and offer near identical gaming performance at stock speeds.

Motherboard Nothing wrong with it really, but as previously mentioned it's too expensive really without offering any real benefits.

Graphics Card The GTX650Ti is a good mid-lower end card. It's solid value, but in a gaming machine you probably want to be spending more on graphics as that's where you get all the performance. Also important is what you actually want it to achieve. What resolution does your monitor run at? Do you intend to run multiple displays? Do you want to turn up every setting to maximum or are you happy tweaking things a little to get good performance? All of these questions have a big bearing on graphics card selection.

The rest of the items are unlikely to shift as much because they aren't progressing at the same rate of development.
The ram is fine but it does have a reasonably tall heatsink thingy on top (I have it myself), which might block a CPU cooler depending the motherboard.
The case is a matter of taste but I'd recommend going for a case with front USB3.0. Might seem trivial now but with bigger and bigger flash drives and the like it's a nice feature to have.
HDD is fine but you might want to consider investing in an SSD as well. Prices on these are still dropping and they are a lot faster, great to put your OS on and anything you use a lot.
PSU is fine but it's probably too expensive relative to your budget. It's also overkill for the amount of power you are likely to require. The vast majority of single GPU setups will run fine on a 500-550W PSU, and you can pick up a quality one for $55-60 at the moment.
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January 14, 2013 5:28:03 AM

Thanks for all your suggestions, i will totally take them, but if i changed something for making it a best gaming experience, like, spend more on something an less in other thing, what could be changed or what do u recomend
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January 14, 2013 5:40:14 AM

You cut cost on the motherboard and use the savings on either a better gpu or an SSD. You could also drop the wireless network card and hardwire it. Could save $20 to $30 on the PSU if you found a good deal. But bigger GPU and SSD are the easiest ways to better performance from where you are now.
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January 14, 2013 6:07:42 AM

2742501,11,609719 said:
You cut cost on the motherboard and use the savings on either a better gpu or an SSD. You could also drop the wireless network card and hardwire it. Could save $20 to $30 on the PSU if you found a good deal. But bigger GPU and SSD are the easiest ways to better performance from where you are now.[/quote's]
^^ i'd definitely get an ssd for ur boot and some of ur games.
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January 14, 2013 6:30:23 AM

necrokamios said:
1. if you ever want to find out how to build a pc, best way, is to pick up any old PC that you have in your house, really old ones (the ones that are probably sitting there gathering dust) that cannot play anything. and take it apart :) ...then put it back together again :) .


What an excellent idea: some of the best advice I've ever heard.
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a b 4 Gaming
January 14, 2013 10:25:21 AM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Systems by Mousemonkey
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January 15, 2013 6:12:39 PM

Best answer selected by pablozb.
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