Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Do you crop your DSLR images?

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.

I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
image.

How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
curious.


--
Douglas...
"You finally make it on the Internet
when you get your own personal Troll".
Mine's called Chrlz. Don't feed him, he bites!

More about : crop dslr images

Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Pixby" <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42eca2a7$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a framing
> habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images were
> enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image unless
> it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer for
> the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to start
> printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing wrong
> with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.
>
>
> --
> Douglas...
> "You finally make it on the Internet
> when you get your own personal Troll".
> Mine's called Chrlz. Don't feed him, he bites!

Generally, I only crop the amount necessary to get the proportions of the
paper, i.e. 8x10, 11x14, A3, etc.
That being said, sometimes I find that, compositionally, an image works
better with additional cropping, and to a point, I'll do that.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
>framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
>were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
>unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
>I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
>for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
>start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
>wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
>image.
>
>How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>curious.

Always to get the maximum effect I'm looking for in the image and I
don't stay with the normal ratios. I do what ever makes the most
esthetically pleasing image to me.


*********************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
Related resources
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Pixby wrote:

> Sometime amovnt the era I began to vse 35mm cameras, I developed a
> framing habit so as not to lose any preciovs resolvtion when the
> images were enlarged. I vnconsciovsly do it now and almost never crop
> an image vnless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the
> 2/3rds thing.
>
> I dovble booked this weekend and had to engage a contract
> Photographer for the 'other' shoot. I've jvst been going throvgh his
> work ready to start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need
> cropping. Nothing wrong with his photography, jvst the fact he leaves
> lots of room in the image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Jvst
> cvriovs.

Like yov, I'm a "frame filler" and most often vse the entire shot in
print. Having said that, I have no reservations abovt post cropping ovt
clvtter or cropping to enhance presentation. For that matter, cropping
ovt 10% - 20% in a dimension has little effect on the resolvtion of an 8
x 12 print.

I shot 1st Commvnion portraits for a pro last year and he was very
pleased with my framing. He had a pro working for him who vsvally shot
MF (6x6) and who left enormovs room arovnd the 35mm shots for the 1st
commvnions. He said that the other fellow was so vsed to 6x6 and fat
framing that he had trovble making tighter framed shots.

Cheers,
Alan.


--
-- r.p.e.35mm vser resovrce: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmvr.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysvr.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rvlz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLvnch.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <42eca2a7$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, Pixby
<pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote:

> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.

I shoot a lot of indoor volleyball. I really don't have time to frame
properly and still get the shot unless I'm shooting one particular
player and can follow her rather than the play. So cropping is a
wonderful capability that digital has made easy. Since most of my work
goes to web sites or video, the cropping does not seriously affect
quality.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Pixby wrote:
> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
> framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
> were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
> unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
> for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
> start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
> wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
> image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.
>

I sometimes crop completely in the viewfinder, but in a lot of shots,
magazine editors want space around the central subject to display
heads, captions, whatever they choose. Thus, space is left for what the
paying customer wants. Because probably 60-70% of my work is aimed at
magazines, that kind of shooting gets to be a habit (but it is more
desired with certain types of magazines than others, so the habit can
also become a problem).

I've found that with full vehicle shots, extra space around the subject
is a help. For individual features of the vehicle, tight cropping,
often tighter and shaped differently than the sensor, is wanted...but
in other cases, filling the frame is fine, leaving final crop to the
graphics department.

For some kinds of articles, say on woodworking tools, filling the frame
at close up ranges is great. Recently, I did a piece on a jointer that
uses cutters that are about 3/8" square. I went macro with those, next
to a dime, and also did a near macro shot of the entire 8" wide head.
The latter was cropped.

Worked really well.

It differs, in other words, depending on what the customer wants.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Pixby <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
> framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
> were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
> unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
> for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
> start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
> wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
> image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.

Personally, I like to minimize cropping. But for some things, like tiny
birds far away or whatever, it's unavoidable. It'd be nice to have the
glass to shoot them, but I don't, and so I shoot RAW and upsample the
image during conversion. Then I crop what I need to. This gives much
better results than enlarging a cropped image, especially if the
original image was a JPEG.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Pixby" <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42eca2a7$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a framing
> habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images were
> enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image unless
> it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer for
> the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to start
> printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing wrong
> with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.
>

I try to do all my cropping when I shoot, but sometimes it's just impossible
to do. As you have discovered, the less you have to crop the better,
whether using film or digital. Just depends on the camera how much you can
get away with when you do crop -- a combination of sharpness and pixels,
which is why some cameras will give you a better image even if the pixel
count is lower.

Your contracted labor may like to give their shots a bit more breathing room
to work with. Also make it a bit easier when you need to come up with an
8x10, which will always cut off the top or bottom of the image if it's too
tight.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:06:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 13:28:41 GMT, John A. Stovall
<johnastovall@earthlink.net> wrote:

>On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com>
>wrote:
>
>>Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
>>framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
>>were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
>>unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>>
>>I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
>>for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
>>start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
>>wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
>>image.
>>
>>How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>>curious.
>
>Always to get the maximum effect I'm looking for in the image and I
>don't stay with the normal ratios. I do what ever makes the most
>esthetically pleasing image to me.

On thing that is strange is that some people who never liked 6 x 6
in film end up cropping square if the subject is roundish or square.
Why have all that "wing space" if it isn't really needed?
-Rich
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 12:28:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby wrote:

> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a framing
> habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images were
> enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image unless
> it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> [snip]
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.

Of course, I crop, either eliminating part of the image or framing the
shot loosely, if it improves it or I have to allow for copy and/or
inserts.

And you're not one of those fanatics who considers cropping 35mm (or any
format for that matter) some kind of sacrilegious act, to burn in
Hell, if you do? Filed out that old 35mm carrier to get to the entire
image, didn't you? I had so much fun playing with you guys' heads when I
was a young student photographer years ago. Thanks for all the fun. ;-)

Stefan
August 1, 2005 1:09:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <42eca2a7$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, pixby_douglas@hotmail.com says...
>
>Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
>framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
>were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
>unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
>I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
>for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
>start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
>wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
>image.
>
>How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>curious.
>
>
>--
>Douglas...

It depends on what the client wants. I've always shot tight, whether it is 4x
5, or dSlr. However, several clients really like a bit of space, in case the
layout changes. When I shoot for these, or suspect that a new client might be
of this mindset, I leave some space - it saves having to do much Cloning in
Photoshop. With 4x5, I'd usually shoot to the Polaroid, knowing that there was
about 1/8" in. all the way round.

As for your assistant, they may not have felt comfortable doing a tight, in-
camera crop. Depending on how much cropping you need to do, resolution should
not suffer. I think that it is just a different mindset by the photographer,
and, if I were shooting for a new client (in this case you), I would probably
frame a bit more loosely, unless you directed me to do my "normal" thing.

Provided that the work is good, there should be few problems.

Hunt
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 1:48:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
>framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
>were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
>unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
>I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
>for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
>start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
>wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
>image.
>
>How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>curious.

Maybe this was a question mostly for pros, but anyway, here are my
amateur practices:

I crop routinely in two different sets of situations.

1) When I know that I won't have the time to frame properly, or when
I take a close candid shot without looking into the viewfinder, I go
wider than reasonably needed so not to miss anything, and crop
afterwards. Maybe very few pros would take candid shots this way, but
in my experience a fraction of human subjects - perhaps 10% in total,
going up to say 30% in teenage boys - are only possible to photograph
in anything that even vaguely resembles a normal likeness if they are
not aware that a shot is being taken when it is.

2) When I shoot wildlife, I consistently use cropping, sometimes quite
heavy cropping. Regardless of glass, you never get close enough to
small, shy birds...

Otherwise, I sometimes crop lightly to improve the composition, and
occasionlly crop more heavily to rescue one subject in the image if
this subject comes out very well, and the other one is blinking or has
an otherwise unsuitable facial expression.

But of course I always try to frame as competently as I can within the
existing time constraints.


Jan Böhme
Korrekta personuppgifter är att betrakta som journalistik.
Felaktigheter utgör naturligtvis skönlitteratur.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 1:59:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Pixby" <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:42eca2a7$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au...
> Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
> framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
> were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
> unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
> I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
> for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
> start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
> wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
> image.
>
> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
> curious.


Always edit in the viwfinder- as far as possible.
Yet, being a Pentax user since the 60's, all my
perfectly-framed-in-the-viewfinder shots need cropping anyway.

....and I can't bring myself to allow for the Pentax viewfinder, and risk
losing a vital element.

Nowadays, I guess I use about 4.5 of my 6 Mpix.

--
Jeff R.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 2:20:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Pixby <pixby_douglas@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Sometime amount the era I began to use 35mm cameras, I developed a
>framing habit so as not to lose any precious resolution when the images
>were enlarged. I unconsciously do it now and almost never crop an image
>unless it's to accommodate "perfect portrait" size - the 2/3rds thing.
>
>I double booked this weekend and had to engage a contract Photographer
>for the 'other' shoot. I've just been going through his work ready to
>start printing and discovered a lot of his shots need cropping. Nothing
>wrong with his photography, just the fact he leaves lots of room in the
>image.
>
>How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>curious.


When shooting digital (Four Thirds) or large format (4x5in) I fill the
frame with the subject and don't usually do any cropping. With 35mm I
usually crop from one or both ends to bring the shot to a 1:1.25
ratio, for example to print on 8x10inch paper.

With 12 on 120 (6x6cm) I have to crop *every* shot to get to 1:1.25.
As far as I can recall I have never used a 6x6cm image uncropped.

It sounds like your man is used to shooting medium format.
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 11:10:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

When taking candid photos of people I usually leave some vacant space around
the subject to allow for movement. Means I usually crop some of the shot
afterwards.

Toa
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 2:34:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

stefan patric <not@thisaddress.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby wrote:

>> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>> curious.

> Of course, I crop, either eliminating part of the image or framing the
> shot loosely, if it improves it or I have to allow for copy and/or
> inserts.

Of course.

> And you're not one of those fanatics who considers cropping 35mm (or any
> format for that matter) some kind of sacrilegious act, to burn in
> Hell, if you do?

I've been to exhibitions where the photographer carefully printed the
surround to show the famous "Hassleblad notch" and prove that they
cropped nothing. Sigh. How stupid.

Andrew.
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 12:48:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

IAFFAP (I am far from a pro), but I never print a photo without cropping.
What's the chance I framed it just right while shooting (often in a hurry).
I'll tell you - it's very unlikely!

Also frames and mattes are more widely available and cheaper in standard
sizes. So if I like a pic I always crop to 8x10 or 11x14, to frame with
matte. Otherwise I might go broke. I save the money to by ink, paper,
frames, and new lenses.

To me, not to crop, would be like not using levels (for enhancing
"lighting"), color saturation, sharpness, etc. before printing. What's the
chance that the shot was taken just right in regards to those qualities.
I'll tell you. It's not likely!
Anonymous
August 2, 2005 3:00:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <11erul6n0sire40@news.supernews.com>,
Andrew Haley <andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote:
>stefan patric <not@thisaddress.com> wrote:
>> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby wrote:
>
>>> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>>> curious.
>
>> Of course, I crop, either eliminating part of the image or framing the
>> shot loosely, if it improves it or I have to allow for copy and/or
>> inserts.
>
>Of course.

I try to fill the frame with the intended subject matter, but
this is not always possible. If not, of course I will crop. Also, I
will crop to change the format to make a better match for the desired
use. (Sometimes, something square or otherwise reshaped will do better
for the subject or the application.)

>> And you're not one of those fanatics who considers cropping 35mm (or any
>> format for that matter) some kind of sacrilegious act, to burn in
>> Hell, if you do?
>
>I've been to exhibitions where the photographer carefully printed the
>surround to show the famous "Hassleblad notch" and prove that they
>cropped nothing. Sigh. How stupid.

That is rather extreme. I like to maximize the amount of usable
image if I can. Zoom lenses allow this in more situations, but not in
all. Of course cropping is sometimes necessary, even if the zoom range
is reasonable, or the distance to the subject can be appropriately
adjusted, as some images cry out to be square or some other non-standard
format.

Enjoy,
DoN.

--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
August 4, 2005 12:35:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

One of the self-imposed exercises is to frame as tightly as possible when
taking a picture. After doing this for awhile, I realized that I am able to
sport opportunities much better. I routinely throw away less than ideal
frames rather than try to save them with large amount of cropping. Of
course, I use cropping to adjust to desired print sizes.


"DoN. Nichols" <dnichols@d-and-d.com> wrote in message
news:D cmnjl$bp0$1@Fuego.d-and-d.com...
> In article <11erul6n0sire40@news.supernews.com>,
> Andrew Haley <andrew29@littlepinkcloud.invalid> wrote:
>>stefan patric <not@thisaddress.com> wrote:
>>> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:06:09 +1000, Pixby wrote:
>>
>>>> How many other people make cropping a normal event when editing? Just
>>>> curious.
>>
>>> Of course, I crop, either eliminating part of the image or framing the
>>> shot loosely, if it improves it or I have to allow for copy and/or
>>> inserts.
>>
>>Of course.
>
> I try to fill the frame with the intended subject matter, but
> this is not always possible. If not, of course I will crop. Also, I
> will crop to change the format to make a better match for the desired
> use. (Sometimes, something square or otherwise reshaped will do better
> for the subject or the application.)
>
>>> And you're not one of those fanatics who considers cropping 35mm (or any
>>> format for that matter) some kind of sacrilegious act, to burn in
>>> Hell, if you do?
>>
>>I've been to exhibitions where the photographer carefully printed the
>>surround to show the famous "Hassleblad notch" and prove that they
>>cropped nothing. Sigh. How stupid.
>
> That is rather extreme. I like to maximize the amount of usable
> image if I can. Zoom lenses allow this in more situations, but not in
> all. Of course cropping is sometimes necessary, even if the zoom range
> is reasonable, or the distance to the subject can be appropriately
> adjusted, as some images cry out to be square or some other non-standard
> format.
>
> Enjoy,
> DoN.
>
> --
> Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
> (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
> --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
!