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$700 Gaming PC

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January 16, 2013 2:42:19 PM

Hey, How does this build look to you guys?
I already have a mouse and monitor, and I prefer to stay with Windows 7.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xNQH
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xNQH/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xNQH/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.57 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($239.99 @ Microcenter)
Case: Zalman Z9 ATX Mid Tower Case ($31.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Keyboard: Logitech K120 Wired Standard Keyboard ($11.39 @ Amazon)
Total: $701.85
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-16 11:36 EST-0500)

A few questions.
Is the RAM compatible with the motherboard, cause I've seen a few people having issues with other brands?
Also, is the PSU good enough? Someone else recommended I get at least 500w.

Thanks. :) 

More about : 700 gaming

January 16, 2013 2:53:55 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUhZ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUhZ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUhZ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0598 45.1 CFM CPU Cooler ($13.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($41.26 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($227.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Zalman Z9 ATX Mid Tower Case ($31.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($87.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $712.71
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-16 11:55 EST-0500)

within ur budget and nicely built,

and better ram and hd and videocard model, and powersupply :)  and an aftermarket cooler to keep nice temps on that intel.

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Best solution

January 16, 2013 3:17:27 PM

Actually, your build is fine but I would go with iceclock's suggestion of the PSU, RAM and CPU cooler.

However, I do not agree on the Graphics Card brand. The 7870 series is great but the XFX models run ever hotter than the reference AMD models. I would stick with the Gigabyte 7870.

Everything else looks great!
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January 16, 2013 3:23:04 PM

I have an i3-3225 with the stock cooler in a not-very-well ventilated Lian Li PC-Q25 and it doesn't get over 55c running prime95 or gaming with an HD6850. The aftermarket cooler might lower temps a bit more, but is unnecessary.

IMO, save $14 on the cooler, save $6 on the RAM, save $15 on the HDD, increase your budget another $30 and add a 60GB SSD boot drive:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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January 16, 2013 3:26:47 PM

06yfz450ridr said:
450w seems small


Its actually quite appropriately sized. There isn't much headroom, but if the OP doesn't end up going nuts with anything in the future, that would be more than sufficient.
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January 16, 2013 3:29:08 PM

truprecht said:
I have an i3-3225 with the stock cooler in a not-very-well ventilated Lian Li PC-Q25 and it doesn't get over 55c running prime95 or gaming with an HD6850. The aftermarket cooler might lower temps a bit more, but is unnecessary.

IMO, save $14 on the cooler, save $6 on the RAM, save $15 on the HDD, increase your budget another $30 and add a 60GB SSD boot drive:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Never buy a 60GB SSD. It is too small to actually do anything with. Yes, there are those out there who get off on micromanaging their Windows footprint, etc. IMHO, its more trouble than its worth. A 128GB SSD is where I would start.
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January 16, 2013 3:32:06 PM

Alright, thanks guys. :) 
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January 16, 2013 3:40:29 PM

Yeah, so I think I'll stick with the Gigabyte card, and switch to the G-Skill RAM and XFX PSU.

And once get a little more money, I can buy an SSD then.
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January 16, 2013 3:46:25 PM

iknowhowtofixit said:
Never buy a 60GB SSD. It is too small to actually do anything with. Yes, there are those out there who get off on micromanaging their Windows footprint, etc. IMHO, its more trouble than its worth. A 128GB SSD is where I would start.


I agree that 128 is preferable, and doubling the capacity will only cost an additional $20-30 if you watch for deals. But 60 still far better than none - I have 2 machines running on 60GB SSD boot drives without problems or micro-management. Windows only takes 30GB. If you let it keep an infinite number of restore points or temp files you can eventually fill up the remaining 22GB (8GB for pagefile), but it's a once-a-year maintenance, not constant micro-management. The 15-second boot time alone is worth it, IMO.
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January 16, 2013 4:15:02 PM

heres my revised build for u even better price.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUTL
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUTL/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xUTL/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i3-3220 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($41.26 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F3 EG 1TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.88 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Zalman Z9 ATX Mid Tower Case ($31.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($34.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Keyboard: Logitech K120 Wired Standard Keyboard ($11.39 @ Amazon)
Total: $677.43
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-16 13:14 EST-0500)

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January 17, 2013 1:03:25 AM

truprecht said:
I agree that 128 is preferable, and doubling the capacity will only cost an additional $20-30 if you watch for deals. But 60 still far better than none - I have 2 machines running on 60GB SSD boot drives without problems or micro-management. Windows only takes 30GB. If you let it keep an infinite number of restore points or temp files you can eventually fill up the remaining 22GB (8GB for pagefile), but it's a once-a-year maintenance, not constant micro-management. The 15-second boot time alone is worth it, IMO.


Most issues I've seen using this size come from the app data folder in Windows 7. Its a dumping ground for software and it usually doesn't get cleaned up when you uninstall. Then, if you just start deleting random things, you'll end up with broken software.
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January 26, 2013 11:06:54 PM

Best answer selected by Evan5567.
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