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800-1k build

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January 16, 2013 6:49:37 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: 5 weeks about


Budget Range: $800-$1000


System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming School work surfing the web Burning movies would like to be able to handle anything i would possibly want to do


Are you buying a monitor: Yes but that isnt really included in the range i specified


Parts to Upgrade: Whole system


Do you need to buy OS: Yes


Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg or tiger direct? micro center is semi close to where i live


Location: Florence Ky 41042 USA


Parts Preferences: Intel Based


Overclocking: Yes


SLI or Crossfire: Maybe?


Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080? not sure want something good


Additional Comments: Want to replace my gaming console, Future proof, Want it to be able to handle whatever i would throw at it from photo&video editing etc to gaming to just surfing


And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: Want a new desktop with good quality parts that wont be obsolete a year from now


On another note i have never built one before i would like to know on a scale of 1-10 how difficult this would be with the help of youtube and other things on the net as a reference

More about : 800 build

a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 12:26:11 AM

Wont be too hard to build :)  Have fun building it. This should tick all your boxes except the price one which is a little over 1k.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xZRk
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xZRk/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/xZRk/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($41.26 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($51.52 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($157.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1050.67
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-16 21:25 EST-0500)
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January 17, 2013 1:08:51 AM

thanks camo that helps alot. everyone seems to be recommending the 3570k is the 3770k really just the wrong choice or just a waste of money? would it affect the build in a negative way somehow as its only 30 or 40 more dollars at microcenter are there some other benefits to choosing this i5 over that one i know im not as informed as many of you here but it just seems like the i7 would just be the better option??

i think i would want more ram eventually at least what would be the max i could install over time and wouldnt a ssd drive improve preformance also ?

not sure how well you could answer this but how good is that video card would i be able to achieve ultra graphics with great performance or is it a mid grade model?

what kind of optical drive would you suggest for burning movies
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Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 1:22:45 AM

Pick the i5-3570k in microcenter, for your needs it will do, get the MSI mobo there with that cpu it goes for 40$ the mobo : http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/cc7faafd#/cc7faafd/...

So if you do something like this, it might fit the ssd, and a good 7870

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G41 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.57 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Sandisk Extreme 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.00 @ Adorama)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($239.99 @ Microcenter)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB/RSBS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Dell ST2220L 21.5" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1059.44
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 1:46:56 AM

eldorado9288 said:
thanks camo that helps alot. everyone seems to be recommending the 3570k is the 3770k really just the wrong choice or just a waste of money? would it affect the build in a negative way somehow as its only 30 or 40 more dollars at microcenter are there some other benefits to choosing this i5 over that one i know im not as informed as many of you here but it just seems like the i7 would just be the better option??

i think i would want more ram eventually at least what would be the max i could install over time and wouldnt a ssd drive improve preformance also ?

not sure how well you could answer this but how good is that video card would i be able to achieve ultra graphics with great performance or is it a mid grade model?

what kind of optical drive would you suggest for burning movies


really no point in grabbing an i7 for gaming as it performs more or less the same. at it's best, you gain 2-3fps; worst off, and believe it or not it can happen, you lose 2-3fps. even for $30, there's no value in it. when games do benefit from hexa-cores, you're better off making a new build.

2x4gb 1600mhz ram is plenty for most people, if not too much. when you do need more ram, they're easy enough to add in. the best an SSD helps in gaming is the load time. but for your budget, you should be able to get one in your build.

it's a great card for the price, and with rumors of the 13.1 catalyst driver coming soon, it'll hopefully put the recent problems with AMD cards to rest. it'll play most games at ultra at 1080p, but don't expect it to hit 60+ fps at 2-4xMSAA every time in some of the more graphically demanding game.

naturally, a DVD drive is the common choice. personally, never really see that much a difference between the brands/models, so a $20 dvd drive will do. now if you were going to use Blu-ray, then expect to spend $50+ for one that can burn unto a disc.
cheapest one i found;
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/asus-optical-drive-bw12b1s...

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January 17, 2013 1:56:11 AM

ok thanks alot hazle and django for your help more is always welcome if any others have other build ideas id def like to hear them but i will look into these both more as i still have at least a month before i can afford to do anything. a ? about cases tho say i didnt like either of those cases what should i be looking for as a replacement i realize both these builds have different motherboards which could account for different cases but what should i look for when choosing a case? just that its got the right number of openings or the right layout for the openings or what?
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January 17, 2013 2:09:07 AM

Hey, so it should be noted that it's the graphics card that does the bulk of your gaming. The processor can be pretty close to bad, and if you have a decent GPU, you'll still get good framerates.

Now, this doesn't apply to all games. Skyrim, for example, is notoriously CPU heavy. you'll get bottlenecks even with an i7 3770K.

But for the bulk of games, a 4-core processor clocked at 3-3.5 ghz will be fine. I personally have an AMD FX 6300, but I only went 6-core because I also do video editing.

Unless you're doing serious video editing or 3d-modeling, you'll see no real value from the higher-end processor.

I'd get a 7950 instead of the 7870, which will give you a worthwhile bump in framerates, while dropping the i5 3570K to something cheaper (I'd look at the 130$ range, not the 180$) I don't know intel lines very well, I stick to the more budget-oriented AMD. If you do go amd, just make sure you go with a piledriver architecture CPU. much more efficient than bulldozer.

my build:

gigabyte 7870 (no oc, I bought this slightly used off of amazon so as to get it 70 dollars cheaper)
FX 6300 (no oc, I haven't needed to yet)
500gb WD 7200 RPM
600w 80+ (corsair if I remember right?)
4gbx2 corsair veangence
gigabyte GA-970-something or other (I'm typing this from memory)
20$ optical drive.
antec 300 case.

I built this for 630 USD. almost a third of it went towards a graphics card
a monitor, a copy of win8 pro (which isn't that bad) and a wifi card for the times I go to a lan party ran me another 200$.

I've benchmarked this on crysis 1 and 2. crysis 1 (ultra, 1080p) I get 50-70 fps. crysis 2 (ultra, dx11 update, high res textures, 1080p) I get 40 fps. If I go online to play, though, I bump it down to high settings to make sure I have 50 fps or better.

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a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 2:19:30 AM

choosing a case really depends on the person. some want it for the looks, others for practicality. here's a quick outline what to look out for, in no particular order of importance;

-proper ventilation, and hence better cooling of your PC. having 2+ fans installed is preferable.
-space and room for graphics card
-space and room for your CPU heatsink
-holes for cable management is a massive plus
-sturdy build quality.
-fits your motherboard. atx and matx boards are the commonly used motherboard sizes used.
-bottom mounted power supply is good.
-fits other components you may add in the future (more HDDs, longer Graphics card, water cooling pumps & reservoirs, etc.)
- if you're easily annoyed by noise, you'll want a silent case. usually, the downside to this is that they run hotter than non-silent cases.

various other things to look at, but these come up off the top of my head. it's a good idea to look through various reviews of cases as well as checking out their specs at the manufacturer's site. famous brands to look out for are Antec, Cooler Master, Corsair, Silverstone and Fractal Design. how it looks is highly subjective. i'm currently using a HAF912 which does it's job, though i'm more in love with the 200R, and Fractal Design's Core 3000 before that.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 2:20:01 AM

@CarolKarine

Why would he pick a much worse cpu, when he can pick the i5+z77 mobo for 230$.
The FX-6300+mobo it's like ~200$, the performance/value is on the i5 side with microcenter pick up, the i5-3570k will last longer, it's not wise with a 1000$ budget going with a fx-6300, there's a point in there for the 7950, but if he drops the ssd, he can get a 7970.
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January 17, 2013 2:49:39 AM

Quote:
Why would he pick a much worse cpu, when he can pick the i5+z77 mobo for 230$.
The FX-6300+mobo it's like ~200$, the performance/value is on the i5 side with microcenter pick up, the i5-3570k will last longer, it's not wise with a 1000$ budget going with a fx-6300, there's a point in there for the 7950, but if he drops the ssd, he can get a 7970.


wait hold on. how do I get an i5 + a z77 for under 400 USD?

I'm not saying get the 6300. I'm saying get a processor in that price range. intel, AMD, whatever. 4300. I'm just saying that if he wants to game, he needs to put money into the part of his computer that gaming will need - IE, the GPU. I have a build that runs a 680 OC'ed with a dual core processor that's 4 years old and gets the performance that is expected. (well, I don't have. I built and then sold using some old parts the buyer already had)

was that better phrased?
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January 17, 2013 2:53:38 AM

when I say my build, I mean the one I built and am posting from.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 2:58:50 AM

He can get an i5 for 189.99$ in microcenter(he said he lives semi near one) and a z77 msi mobo for 40$, that's 230$.
So it's totally worth it, there's other mobos there too, in which it doesn't go more than ~250$ plus the cpu included in the price.
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January 17, 2013 4:21:18 PM

Yea i live about 25 mins from the microcenter in cincinnati this is the link to the deal with the mobos there look to be 6 available with that deal my ? is which is the better option. i hope they run this deal up untill i get the money :) 
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 17, 2013 10:59:52 PM

as far as i can remember, Microcenter had always had intel CPUs and motherboards for cheap compared to other places. i don't even think it's even a deal. it's just the normal, actual price there.
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January 20, 2013 3:18:06 PM

Kind of unrelated to the build but hoping someone here will have the answer. its my understanding that this pc will not have wireless internet capabilities nor do i want it to since being hooked straight up to the modem is a faster connection correct me if im wrong. my phone is controlled by my modem however and all of that is upstairs. its not going to work out with me taking the main phone base with the answering machine down into my lair so how can i set this up so that i can be hardwired to the internet ?

I briefly read something about a wireless bridge and something else cant think of what its called now but it kinda made sense when i read it.. would that be a soulution to this problem if not how can this be done

thanks for the help

Dustin
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 21, 2013 1:43:52 AM

nope. no wireless. if you want it, you'll be needing to spend on either a PCI, PCIe or USB wireless adapter. shouldn't costs you more than $40. some boards do have a built-in wi-fi, though most that i've seen are either on expensive high-end boards, or on mITX boards.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sue1Zvmh8JA

yes, wired ethernet are usually preferred by many due to lack of wireless interference and consistency. as for your options to connecting to your modem, there's using a powerline adapter, though last i checked as the video outlined, you'll need an electrical socket fully dedicated to this. sharing the socket with other devices may not guarantee the best results. there's also a wireless variation to this. though they costs a bit more. plus you need to buy a wireless adapter for your PC as well this way.

for a more direct ethernet line, there's good old drilling a hole through the ceiling + one long ethernet cable if you can't be bothered moving the modem/router downstairs.
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