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$1300 pc

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January 19, 2013 3:28:48 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: few weeks

Budget Range: Around $1300-$1400 after everything (no monitor)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: gaming, internet browsing

Are you buying a monitor: No

Parts to Upgrade: new build

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: idc

Location: City, State/Region, Country - Missouri, United States

Parts Preferences: idc

Overclocking: Yes

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920 x 1080

Additional Comments: I want to play high end games

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I want to run games fast


Here's what I have so far

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypho
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypho/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypho/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($77.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($407.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1304.41
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-19 12:27 EST-0500)

More about : 1300

January 19, 2013 4:05:07 PM

Any other tips guys?
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January 19, 2013 4:16:05 PM

Ok. First off the Xeon E3-1230 is not the direction you want to go for a cpu. The 3570k has everything you want and can overclock. The Xeon is designed as a server processor, not for gaming. The other change I would suggest is Cpu-cooler. The Evo is a great intro cooler, it will net you most of the performance/temperature gains of other cooling systems. However, other coolers like the Xigmatek Dark Knight II and Noctua NH-D14 are significantly better at cooling and will give you much safer temps at your cpu's limits. I would suggest the Dark Knight II in terms of price/performance.
Other than that I've built with Rosewill's r5 gaming case and its on par with any of the others in that market at a much lower price. The dust filters are great. Also if you're going to spend more than $100 on a power supply you might as well go all out and get the Corsair AX-860i. It's by far the most power-friendly psu out there right now and will pay back the investment tremendously in both power savings and in keeping your components healthy. I'd take money out of the ssd to do that but that's of course up to you.
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Related resources
January 19, 2013 4:17:41 PM

Noob12 said:
Lets see.. how about this build?

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypT1
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypT1/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/ypT1/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V2 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($232.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($126.47 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Sandisk Extreme 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($169.00 @ Adorama)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($407.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 660W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($140.71 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1347.65
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-19 12:48 EST-0500)



xeon e3 can not be OCed, you might as well go without an aftermarket cooler and switch it down to an H77 motherboard. Also you are spending way to much on the PSU and Ram
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January 19, 2013 4:19:04 PM

kevin83 said:
Ok. First off the Xeon E3-1230 is not the direction you want to go for a cpu. The 3570k has everything you want and can overclock. The Xeon is designed as a server processor, not for gaming. The other change I would suggest is Cpu-cooler. The Evo is a great intro cooler, it will net you most of the performance/temperature gains of other cooling systems. However, other coolers like the Xigmatek Dark Knight II and Noctua NH-D14 are significantly better at cooling and will give you much safer temps at your cpu's limits. I would suggest the Dark Knight II in terms of price/performance.
Other than that I've built with Rosewill's r5 gaming case and its on par with any of the others in that market at a much lower price. The dust filters are great. Also if you're going to spend more than $100 on a power supply you might as well go all out and get the Corsair AX-860i. It's by far the most power-friendly psu out there right now and will pay back the investment tremendously in both power savings and in keeping your components healthy. I'd take money out of the ssd to do that but that's of course up to you.



The E3 is a server processor but it can run as a desktop fine. You would usually want to get a Xeon when you are doing professional work because it is just as strong as an i7 for cheaper.

Also i would say no on the AX860, at the price it is right now, it will not even pay itself back Vsing a normal bronze/silver until a very long time.
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January 19, 2013 4:28:03 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2 54.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.95 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.57 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Sandisk Extreme 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($169.00 @ Adorama)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($122.75 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1268.21
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-19 13:27 EST-0500)

a much more balanced build and cheaper one.
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January 19, 2013 4:33:25 PM

It would be much faster to buy a 3570k (Ivy bridge>Sandy Bridge by about 5-10%) and then also get the performance gains from overclocking (about another 20% depending on how hard you push it) giving you way more performance than the Xeon E3-1230 even in professional applications.
The payback time on platinum power supplies over bronze/silver is 2-3 years. This power supply is designed to last 5-10 years and will still rival new psus being made in that time frame. The only other argument is buying it over a seasonic, and the seasonic power supplies have worse ripple/noise measurements, so if you're going to spend $150-$200 on a platinum psu the corsair digital psus are the way to go.
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January 19, 2013 4:39:05 PM

Xeon e3 is IB, it is just as fast as i7 in terms of performance.

And no 2-3 years will not be the time it pays it self off.

XFX 850W is silver vsing AX860i which is plat. It will save $2-$3 dollars a year

XFX costs $122.75 while AX860i costs $235.98. If you are smart enough, you can do the math yourself. Also you have forgot that most PSU now are made by Seasonic so noise/ripple is barely and issue
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January 19, 2013 4:59:39 PM

This guy noob12 has been going around for days recommending Xeon CPUs.

DO NOT BUY A XEON

They take really expensive motherboards, they can't be overclocked (not easily and not very much), they don't use normal RAM, and they gain you literally nothing except a couple of cores that your computer won't use anyway.

Xeons are optimized for servers. If you're building a server, great, buy a Xeon. If you're building a home PC, buy an i5 or an i7.
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January 19, 2013 9:48:28 PM

Boulbox's math is crazy. IF you use even only 500w of an 860w psu your power supply will draw 582 watts from the wall if its silver as opposed to 535 if you use platinum. If you run the computer for a year it will draw $40 to $50 more in power from the wall. So realistically a seasonic 860w platinum will pay itself back entirely in 3 years of uptime. You could expect to use that power supply for at least five years since efficiency improvements have such diminishing returns.
Again, the xeons do not overclock. The specific xeon you listed is based on the sandy bridge spec. It's only advantage is hyperthreading which is quickly made up for many times over by the ability of the 3570k to overclock. It uses an LGA1155 slot, but you wouldn't want to run a server processor in that slot anyways. It is most certainly a worse idea to run a xeon in a desktop application
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January 19, 2013 10:35:26 PM

kevin83 said:
Boulbox's math is crazy. IF you use even only 500w of an 860w psu your power supply will draw 582 watts from the wall if its silver as opposed to 535 if you use platinum. If you run the computer for a year it will draw $40 to $50 more in power from the wall. So realistically a seasonic 860w platinum will pay itself back entirely in 3 years of uptime. You could expect to use that power supply for at least five years since efficiency improvements have such diminishing returns.
Again, the xeons do not overclock. The specific xeon you listed is based on the sandy bridge spec. It's only advantage is hyperthreading which is quickly made up for many times over by the ability of the 3570k to overclock. It uses an LGA1155 slot, but you wouldn't want to run a server processor in that slot anyways. It is most certainly a worse idea to run a xeon in a desktop application


i did not recommend xeon,

"500w of an 860w psu your power supply will draw 582 watts from the wall"
Where do u even get this info....

"If you run the computer for a year it will draw $40 to $50 more in power from the wall."
show me calculations
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January 20, 2013 6:27:05 AM

Silver psus are rated for 87% efficiency at optimal load. To get how much you pull from the wall you take the wattage your components use and divide by the efficiency (which at a suboptimal half-load would be like .86) Bringing you to a total power draw of like 580w. Seasonic's platinum psus get 93.5% efficiency even at slightly-suboptimal loads.
Run the computer for a year and you get 5080 kw-hrs. At $.10/kw-hr you pay $508 a year to run it. Rerun the numbers for 93.5% efficiency and you spend $468 a year to run it. 5 years of uptime will net you more than the entire cost of the psu in savings. In some places in America you can get power for $.07 a kw-hr but in others its a lot worse so $.10 is a good estimate.
In comparison to bronze-rated psus you save even more money.
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January 20, 2013 6:03:33 PM

Le sigh, someone still can't do math correctly.

Silver is about 88% while plat is only 92-93%. that is only a 5% difference, you will not see something like $50 a year with a 5% difference.

Not to mention you are thinking about having your computer at full load at all times when more than 50% of the time it is on idle
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January 21, 2013 3:02:06 AM

To put it simply, your first point is invalid because you divide by the efficiency (something I already demonstrated), amplifying that 5% difference which is documented to actually be around 7% to around a 9% difference in power draw. Your second point is invalid because if you assume that the computer is running at a suboptimal low-power load of like 100w the efficiency of the power supply drops off a cliff. The platinum power supplies don't fall off so sharply in efficiency at low loads.

Ok, lets do it your way and find a minimum value. Lets say that you only use it at load 2 hours a day and the rest of the time your components are on idle. At idle you'll still draw at least 100w of power. Another thing you might not be aware of is that 80+ silver does not mean that your power supply will be 88% efficient at all loads. At suboptimal low-loads of 20% efficiency is allowed to drop to 85% for the rating. At a 10% load a lot of silver-rated power supplies drop to below 70-75% efficiency. Platinum power supplies often dramatically exceed specified efficiency and at 10% loads still retain efficiency around 80%.
Lets compare two specific units.
Corsair 860i review: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Corsair/AX860i/
Cooler Master Silent Pro II Silver rated review: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/CoolerMaster/Silent_...

The Corsair AX860i has an efficiency of 92% when drawing only 200w of power. The Silent Pro II has an efficiency of 89% at 200w loads. This would mean drawing 217w vs drawing 225w during idle. Lets say the computer is used for productivity in a job, 8 hours a day. Therefore 2/3 of the day is at this 8w difference and 1/3 of the day is at full load with 532w compared to 556w. That means each day the platinum psu saves you 320w. Over 1 year at $.10/kw-hr you'll save $12. If the computer idles the whole year you still save $7. If the computer runs at full speed the whole year you save $20.

There, thats the whole math with 0 assumptions made. In this scenario the platinum doesn't pay itself back until the 8 year mark because the silver psu retains decent 200w efficiency. However it makes up that inability to recoup power costs by delivering cleaner power to your components, giving them longer lifetimes and lower failure rates.

Basically a cheap platinum-rated power supply is the best way to go. The most expensive ones like Corsair's 860i digital psu aren't cost effective, but still not a bad idea in terms of protecting your components. Rosewill's fortress and tachyon series psus are great cheap options. Those units pay themselves back in 1-2 years in this scenario.
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January 21, 2013 4:12:32 AM

Ha, putting up Corsair vs CM in PSU, what a disappointment

And check your own post on the review

CX(not even Corsairs best/ made by CTC) vsing the 860i(made by seasonic)

77% vs 83.52%, 6.5% difference @ 40-100W load

85.96 vs 92.71%, 6.7% difference @ 20-100% load

and that is bronze vs plat

but i do agree on the cheaper plat supplies and not the outrageous pricey PSUs that you were talking about
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