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Foxconn MCP73M01H1 PCIE disaster

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 5, 2012 2:09:45 AM

Ill start with saying I'm fairly knowledgeable with computers. I'm making an older PC I have an HTPC which I want to run HDMI to a receiver for video/audio for a 5.1 system, then up to the tv for a single input which I will change on the receiver between PC, xbox, and PS3. I want the computer to have the ability to run blueray, so I'm trying to get a better video card in it.

Current specs:
Thermaltake 650w PSU, Pentium E2180 2.0ghz dual core, 4gb RAM, and CURRENTLY (because of this god awful problem) only onboard video on the Foxconn MCP73M01H1 (GeForce 7100/nForce 630i chipset).


I had an NVIDIA GTX 570 in there (yes, way overpowered, it was just sitting waiting for a new home) which showed video just fine and had no issues what-so-ever which is no inside a gaming PC. I purchased an MSI GT 630 due to the HDMI out on it, placed it in the computer in the PCIE slot, no video to it, however video was still going to the on board. Checked BIOS, option is to start VGA from PCIE first, there is no option to disable onboard video. I even tried disabling onboard Audio and staring PCIE VGA first, still no luck on the PCIE, but video still going onboard. Next was a gigabyte GT 630, same exact thing. And finally an AMD Radeon HD 6570, same exact thing.

All three of those cards are new in box. All three have fans spinning. And all three give video output on my gaming PC. Just to make sure my PCIE port didnt somehow blow out, I took the GTX 570 out of my gaming PC and put it back into this one, video works perfect.

I have updated the BIOS through HP to the newest version (its that stupid HP specific made MOBO), uninstalled all drivers to try and get it to kick. Uninstalled the Audio/Video in windows 7 in a desperate attempt to get something (even though it wont show PCIE video in POST so it doesnt matter anyway), checked if there was a jumper setting to try to disable the onboard video (there isnt), and disabled EVERYTHING that i possibly could in bios and kept the PCIE VGA setting. Still NO pcie video unless im using the bulked up gtx570 (which makes NO sense because its a much better/needier card than the other three sub $100 cards).

I hate asking for computer help because i can always figure it out on my own, but this one has me more frustrated than ive ever been with computers. The only thing i can think of is that this shitty MOBO is temperamental and is going to get thrown from a cliff. Any suggestions?
November 17, 2013 8:01:40 AM

I'm having essentially the same problem as the original poster. In trying to upgrade my girlfriend's computer, an HP a6300f (with this same Foxconn mobo), I generally *can't* get any video output going to a video card, regardless of how I set the primary display in the CMOS settings. I've tried so far with an nVidia 8500 GT and an nVidia 9800 GTX+.

I say "generally" because it did start working yesterday, for reasons, I cannot fathom - but it doesn't work today, for reasons I also cannot fathom.

And let me make clear that this is a motherboard / chipset problem, not a Windows problem, because I'm talking about the HP splash screen, CMOS settings screen, etc. where I'm not getting video (well, I'm *also* not getting video in Windows, but if I can't get it outside of Windows too then it's obviously not a Windows / driver issue).

During the hour or two yesterday when I actually did get video, I was seeing it everywhere - both outside of Windows and within Windows (Vista 32-bit, btw, just to be thorough). Today, no dice.

So, yeah. Does anybody have any information that would help?
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November 17, 2013 1:29:48 PM

After playing with this all day, I now understand *what* the problem is, though I still cannot offer any awesome solutions. I can offer a semblance of a workaround, though. I am putting this up here for the benefit of anybody else who might someday stumble across this same problem with the HP a6300f and/or Foxconn MCP73M01H1 .

When the computer is turned on, the motherboard says, "Hey, do I have any add-in video cards? If so, I'll use it as the primary display; otherwise, I'll use my onboard nVidia 7100." What's happening, though, is that a lot of video cards (the two I mentioned in my post this morning, as well as the ones the OP mentioned) aren't coming up quickly enough for the motherboard to see it at the time that it makes its decision; the motherboard is deciding too quickly in its startup process that no PCI-e cards are installed, and activating the onboard video instead, when in fact the PCI-e cards maybe just needed another split second to power on all the way.

The solution is to first cold boot the computer (with the monitor plugged into the onboard video port), then do a warm reboot after that, switching the monitor cable while the computer is shutting down to restart. What happens is that since the video card has already had power going to it, the motherboard is able to see it right away upon reboot and activate it early on, and thereby assign it as the primary display.

You don't really have to switch the monitor cable at all though, if you don't really want to; if you want to keep the cable plugged into your video card, just memorize the keystrokes for doing a soft reboot from your OS of choice, and do it blindly after the first startup.

Now, the idea had occurred to me that I could simply Ctrl-Alt-Del early in the boot process to get the same effect. This didn't work for me though. For some reason, the computer seemed to be *off* longer when I rebooted that way, thereby ruining the effect I was hoping to achieve. I don't know why that would be so; all I'm doing is reporting my observation. I thought all soft reboots were created equal, but maybe there's some subtlety that I'm unaware of.

The other thing I tried was hitting F10 multiple times; what this does (at least on my girlfriend's HP) is put me in CMOS setup screen. Conveniently, F10 is also the Save and Exit (and reboot) option, meaning that if I hit F10 a bunch of times in the blind, and then hit Enter, I'd generally get a soft reboot. Unfortunately, only sometimes was the reboot quick enough for the video card to stay up and be seen.

With the 9800 gtx+, I found that rebooting blindly from the OS almost always achieves my purpose, whereas F10 sometimes did, and Ctrl-Alt-Del never did.

Anyway, I'd definitely say that this is a mobo problem which *should have been* diagnosed and fixed long ago. At this late date (over 4 years since the last BIOS release), that's clearly not going to happen, though.
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March 18, 2014 1:32:47 AM

PhoenixM said:
After playing with this all day, I now understand *what* the problem is, though I still cannot offer any awesome solutions. I can offer a semblance of a workaround, though. I am putting this up here for the benefit of anybody else who might someday stumble across this same problem with the HP a6300f and/or Foxconn MCP73M01H1 .

When the computer is turned on, the motherboard says, "Hey, do I have any add-in video cards? If so, I'll use it as the primary display; otherwise, I'll use my onboard nVidia 7100." What's happening, though, is that a lot of video cards (the two I mentioned in my post this morning, as well as the ones the OP mentioned) aren't coming up quickly enough for the motherboard to see it at the time that it makes its decision; the motherboard is deciding too quickly in its startup process that no PCI-e cards are installed, and activating the onboard video instead, when in fact the PCI-e cards maybe just needed another split second to power on all the way.

The solution is to first cold boot the computer (with the monitor plugged into the onboard video port), then do a warm reboot after that, switching the monitor cable while the computer is shutting down to restart. What happens is that since the video card has already had power going to it, the motherboard is able to see it right away upon reboot and activate it early on, and thereby assign it as the primary display.

You don't really have to switch the monitor cable at all though, if you don't really want to; if you want to keep the cable plugged into your video card, just memorize the keystrokes for doing a soft reboot from your OS of choice, and do it blindly after the first startup.

Now, the idea had occurred to me that I could simply Ctrl-Alt-Del early in the boot process to get the same effect. This didn't work for me though. For some reason, the computer seemed to be *off* longer when I rebooted that way, thereby ruining the effect I was hoping to achieve. I don't know why that would be so; all I'm doing is reporting my observation. I thought all soft reboots were created equal, but maybe there's some subtlety that I'm unaware of.

The other thing I tried was hitting F10 multiple times; what this does (at least on my girlfriend's HP) is put me in CMOS setup screen. Conveniently, F10 is also the Save and Exit (and reboot) option, meaning that if I hit F10 a bunch of times in the blind, and then hit Enter, I'd generally get a soft reboot. Unfortunately, only sometimes was the reboot quick enough for the video card to stay up and be seen.

With the 9800 gtx+, I found that rebooting blindly from the OS almost always achieves my purpose, whereas F10 sometimes did, and Ctrl-Alt-Del never did.

Anyway, I'd definitely say that this is a mobo problem which *should have been* diagnosed and fixed long ago. At this late date (over 4 years since the last BIOS release), that's clearly not going to happen, though.


could it be that the *new* graphic cards are 2.0's? i believe 2.0's require a power supply of its own from the main power supply (a cord, with 4 or 8 pins, running from the power supply).

the last post on here was Nov 2013, so its a 50 50 chance that i'll get some kind of reply.
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March 18, 2014 6:53:20 AM

soypisto75 said:
PhoenixM said:
After playing with this all day, I now understand *what* the problem is, though I still cannot offer any awesome solutions. I can offer a semblance of a workaround, though. I am putting this up here for the benefit of anybody else who might someday stumble across this same problem with the HP a6300f and/or Foxconn MCP73M01H1 .

When the computer is turned on, the motherboard says, "Hey, do I have any add-in video cards? If so, I'll use it as the primary display; otherwise, I'll use my onboard nVidia 7100." What's happening, though, is that a lot of video cards (the two I mentioned in my post this morning, as well as the ones the OP mentioned) aren't coming up quickly enough for the motherboard to see it at the time that it makes its decision; the motherboard is deciding too quickly in its startup process that no PCI-e cards are installed, and activating the onboard video instead, when in fact the PCI-e cards maybe just needed another split second to power on all the way.

The solution is to first cold boot the computer (with the monitor plugged into the onboard video port), then do a warm reboot after that, switching the monitor cable while the computer is shutting down to restart. What happens is that since the video card has already had power going to it, the motherboard is able to see it right away upon reboot and activate it early on, and thereby assign it as the primary display.

You don't really have to switch the monitor cable at all though, if you don't really want to; if you want to keep the cable plugged into your video card, just memorize the keystrokes for doing a soft reboot from your OS of choice, and do it blindly after the first startup.

Now, the idea had occurred to me that I could simply Ctrl-Alt-Del early in the boot process to get the same effect. This didn't work for me though. For some reason, the computer seemed to be *off* longer when I rebooted that way, thereby ruining the effect I was hoping to achieve. I don't know why that would be so; all I'm doing is reporting my observation. I thought all soft reboots were created equal, but maybe there's some subtlety that I'm unaware of.

The other thing I tried was hitting F10 multiple times; what this does (at least on my girlfriend's HP) is put me in CMOS setup screen. Conveniently, F10 is also the Save and Exit (and reboot) option, meaning that if I hit F10 a bunch of times in the blind, and then hit Enter, I'd generally get a soft reboot. Unfortunately, only sometimes was the reboot quick enough for the video card to stay up and be seen.

With the 9800 gtx+, I found that rebooting blindly from the OS almost always achieves my purpose, whereas F10 sometimes did, and Ctrl-Alt-Del never did.

Anyway, I'd definitely say that this is a mobo problem which *should have been* diagnosed and fixed long ago. At this late date (over 4 years since the last BIOS release), that's clearly not going to happen, though.


could it be that the *new* graphic cards are 2.0's? i believe 2.0's require a power supply of its own from the main power supply (a cord, with 4 or 8 pins, running from the power supply).

the last post on here was Nov 2013, so its a 50 50 chance that i'll get some kind of reply.


The nVidia 8500 GT that I tried did not require additional power, but the 9800 GTX+ did (which I of course gave it, courtesy of a 650-watt PSU that provided two PCIe power connectors). Incidentally, I tried two different power supplies, and still got the same result with that motherboard (which I long since gave up on, actually, after other problems began turning up).

FYI, PCIe power connectors are 6- and 8-pin (not 4 and 8), although there were plenty of AGP video cards that used a standard 4-pin molex connector for extra juice.
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