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First time building pc, need advice

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January 20, 2013 4:01:35 PM

So the time has come when i am going to build my own gaming computer. This is the components i am going to use:

OS: Microsoft windows 7 home premium 64 bit
Disc Drive: LiteOn iHAS124
HDD: Western Digital HD Caviar Blue 1tb
RAM: Kingston HyperX Predator 2 x 8gb DDR3
GPU: Radeon hd 7870
Case: Coolermaster HAF X
CPU: Intel Core i7 3820
Motherboard: Asus sabertooth x79
Powersuply: OCZ PSU 700W ModXStream Pro

So as this is my first time building a computer i am not sure if i should by any additional fans or if my motherboard is overkill and so on. So any advice on installing my system or components i should change would be very helpful. :D 

More about : time building advice

January 20, 2013 4:09:47 PM

this iis not suitable...
CPU: Intel Core i7 3820
Motherboard: Asus sabertooth x79

i5 3570k
z77 board
to go
January 20, 2013 4:31:40 PM

Yep. Bad motherboard and overkill CPU.

Try the i5 that amdradeon suggested and a Gigabyte z77x-ud3h or AsRock z77 Extreme 4.

Keep in mind, this is for gaming. The processor is, at most, 10% of the frames you're getting, and the i5 is MORE than powerful enough to max out any game. (A normal LGA 1155 i7 isn't any better, so don't waste your money there - it's just an i5 with hyperthreading.)

Why would you build a gaming computer and get a mid-range graphics card and a ridiculously expensive processor?

Along with the i5, grab a 7970; get the GHz edition if you don't know how to overclock.

Don't get 16GB of ram, as you will never use that much - get 2x4GB.
Related resources
January 20, 2013 4:33:19 PM

but the i7 is faster and i want to build a system that will last long
January 20, 2013 4:33:55 PM

whats ur max budget and do u need windows+monitor+keyboard
January 20, 2013 4:45:48 PM

The reason for getting a new computer was that i have this crappy acer computer with a i5 650 dual core 3.2 ghz so me thinking it was the gpu that was bad bought a new one and installed it into my old computer. I found out that in areas with high amounts of players (Planet side 2, large bf3 servers) my framerate would drop signicantly. So my guess is that my cpu is the problem. Along with that i have 6gbs of ram and a terrible case that generates heat like no other.
January 20, 2013 4:47:36 PM

iceclock said:
whats ur max budget and do u need windows+monitor+keyboard

I don't really have a max budget, but i want to keep it fairly cheap. Btw i live in Denmark where everything is more expensive.
January 20, 2013 4:52:38 PM

1) Get an SSD. Get the biggest, most reliable (don't worry about fastest) SSD you can afford. They are worth every penny. I have 2 Agility 3 drives in RAID0 for a total of 480GB of space, and that is the single largest determining factor of perceptable performance other than the GPU.
-If you cannot afford a really big SSD, then get something in the 120-240GB range. Load OS and programs on the main partition, and then assign a 2nd 60GB partition to act as SSD cache for your 1TB drive to help with loading your most used games.

2) Stay away from the i7's for gaming. They run a bit hotter, they do not OC as well, and games do not touch the HT cores, or anything more than the standard 4 cores. You will get similar performance out of an OC'd i5 Ivy as you would get from your OC'd i7 SB-E... but you pay an extra premium for that SB-E.
Obviously, there are exceptions to this:
-If you are doing major non-gaming workloads, such as video editing, or other content creation projects (and I mean big projects... not simply youtube videos and such) which utilize the extra ram bandwidth and HT cores, then get a SB-e
-If you plan on using 3-4 GPUs in the system in SLi or xFire then the extra PCIe bandwidth on SB-E becomes useful
But other than those 2 situations, you are just burning money that should be thrown at your SSDs or GPUs

3) High end ASUS boards are almost always worth it if you have the money. Obviously, if you step down to an i5 then you will want a different board, but getting a high end board has some nice perks that you simply don't get with other brands.

4) 16GB of ram is a bit overkill for gaming. Even with modded skyrim, chrome, office, and some other software open on win8 I only hit ~6GB of ram usage, and that is a near worst case scenario.
That being said, if you are on SB-E then you NEED 4 modules of ram to make use of the quad channel DDR, so if you stick with SB-E then you should either go with a 4x4GB or 4x8GB setup. But if you are going to move to an Ivy bridge system then a 2x8GB setup is perfect, and will allow for ram expansion in the future if you need it.

5) having a single 7870 GPU in this build is severely under-powered compared to the rest of your system. If you redistribute your money to go for 2 GPUs on an i5 platform then you will be much happier in the long run. I use a GTX 570 with an i7 CPU. To be honest, with most newer games my CPU is only hitting ~20-40% usage, while the GPU really is not big enough for my settings, so I really cannot stress enough that you need to get as much GPU as you can, and then get a CPU that is just ahead of the load that your games are going to provide.

6) Look out for OCZ power supplies. Now, I use OCZ stuff myself, and have had good luck with them, and absolutely love my OCZ power supply. But OCZ is not exactly known for consistent quality. I am not saying to not get an OCZ power supply... just to be sure and do some research first. Their good stuff is good, but their bad stuff will fry all of your parts... and that is not exactly a risk you ought to take lightly. I would never use an OCZ PSU in a client's PC. Look instead at an Earthwatts or Corsair.

7) Your computer only feels as good as what you interface with. For years and years I use to have extremely high end systems, but then had crappy keys/mice/monitors. It was not a problem until I started using good quality Mitsubishi CRT monitors (talking about back in the late '90s before flat panels took over). I changed nothing else, just the monitor, and all of the sudden I was blown away by my machine. It was just as fast as it ever was, but I could clearly see what it was doing, and that made all of the difference.
Especially with monitors, but also with keyboards and mice, it is almost always worth throwing as much money as you can at them. A good monitor will last you ~10 years, which for most gamers is 3-4 PC builds. So if you look at a $1000 monitor, and divide it by 4 builds, you are actually looking at a cost of $250 per build, or over 10 years you are talking about $100/yr. Yes, it is a bit of money up front, but you get a lot more enjoyment out of the system, plus it will last a lot longer, which will save you money in the end.
A few things to look for:
-IPS. It should be a requirement. Yes, they are prone to slower transitions, but it is hardly noticeable on modern screens that use newer IPS technologies.
-High pixel density. My current monitor is a 27" 1920x1200. It made sense to get it when I bought it because I use to sit a lot further from my screen so size was what mattered more than resolution, but now that I sit a little closer I am annoyed at just how huge the pixels are, which makes me need to use higher AA in games. Also, for web browsing I use to be able to fit 2 full pages side by side when I purchased it 5 years ago... but now that everyone has wide screen monitors web pages have gotten wider, which means that I have to do a bit of side scrolling to see a full page... that is not an issue with higher resolution screens.
Pick whatever size you want/need first, and then find the model that offers the highest resolution for the size. AA becomes less of an issue, text becomes clearer, and pictures have more of a photo quality to them that you just don't get with low DPI monitors.
-White backlights! LED backlights are nice and white, with a very wide color spectrum which makes things really nice. Traditional CCD backlights always make things seem a bit yellow heavy and simply do not have the same *pop* that newer led displays have.

8) cooling. Gaming PCs do not need to be (nor should they be) loud anymore. Oversized air coolers, and good water cooling systems are cheap enough where they are more than worth the silence they bring. Most cooling parts you can install down the road, but you should absolutely get a GPU that comes with a custom cooler pre-installed.
Other than the GPU, you can get everything else later:
- CPU air or water cooler. Get this before you OC. SB-E chips do not come with coolers, so if you go that route you will need one immediately. If you go the Ivy Bridge route then the Intel box cooler is fine for stock performance, but needs to be upgraded before OCing.
-Case fans. Get the biggest quietest fans that will fit in your case
-Fan controller. Get a single fan controller that can handle everything you have rather than running them off of the mobo. My system does not produce a ton of heat, so I have all of my fans set at their minimum 6-800RPM in my computer, but if you are putting out more heat, or are in a warmer environment, then consider getting a controller with some intelligence which can speed up fans when needed.

Anywho, hope that helps!
January 20, 2013 5:04:52 PM

CaedenV said:
1) Get an SSD. Get the biggest, most reliable (don't worry about fastest) SSD you can afford. They are worth every penny. I have 2 Agility 3 drives in RAID0 for a total of 480GB of space, and that is the single largest determining factor of perceptable performance other than the GPU.
-If you cannot afford a really big SSD, then get something in the 120-240GB range. Load OS and programs on the main partition, and then assign a 2nd 60GB partition to act as SSD cache for your 1TB drive to help with loading your most used games.

2) Stay away from the i7's for gaming. They run a bit hotter, they do not OC as well, and games do not touch the HT cores, or anything more than the standard 4 cores. You will get similar performance out of an OC'd i5 Ivy as you would get from your OC'd i7 SB-E... but you pay an extra premium for that SB-E.
Obviously, there are exceptions to this:
-If you are doing major non-gaming workloads, such as video editing, or other content creation projects (and I mean big projects... not simply youtube videos and such) which utilize the extra ram bandwidth and HT cores, then get a SB-e
-If you plan on using 3-4 GPUs in the system in SLi or xFire then the extra PCIe bandwidth on SB-E becomes useful
But other than those 2 situations, you are just burning money that should be thrown at your SSDs or GPUs

3) High end ASUS boards are almost always worth it if you have the money. Obviously, if you step down to an i5 then you will want a different board, but getting a high end board has some nice perks that you simply don't get with other brands.

4) 16GB of ram is a bit overkill for gaming. Even with modded skyrim, chrome, office, and some other software open on win8 I only hit ~6GB of ram usage, and that is a near worst case scenario.
That being said, if you are on SB-E then you NEED 4 modules of ram to make use of the quad channel DDR, so if you stick with SB-E then you should either go with a 4x4GB or 4x8GB setup. But if you are going to move to an Ivy bridge system then a 2x8GB setup is perfect, and will allow for ram expansion in the future if you need it.

5) having a single 7870 GPU in this build is severely under-powered compared to the rest of your system. If you redistribute your money to go for 2 GPUs on an i5 platform then you will be much happier in the long run. I use a GTX 570 with an i7 CPU. To be honest, with most newer games my CPU is only hitting ~20-40% usage, while the GPU really is not big enough for my settings, so I really cannot stress enough that you need to get as much GPU as you can, and then get a CPU that is just ahead of the load that your games are going to provide.

6) Look out for OCZ power supplies. Now, I use OCZ stuff myself, and have had good luck with them, and absolutely love my OCZ power supply. But OCZ is not exactly known for consistent quality. I am not saying to not get an OCZ power supply... just to be sure and do some research first. Their good stuff is good, but their bad stuff will fry all of your parts... and that is not exactly a risk you ought to take lightly. I would never use an OCZ PSU in a client's PC. Look instead at an Earthwatts or Corsair.

7) Your computer only feels as good as what you interface with. For years and years I use to have extremely high end systems, but then had crappy keys/mice/monitors. It was not a problem until I started using good quality Mitsubishi CRT monitors (talking about back in the late '90s before flat panels took over). I changed nothing else, just the monitor, and all of the sudden I was blown away by my machine. It was just as fast as it ever was, but I could clearly see what it was doing, and that made all of the difference.
Especially with monitors, but also with keyboards and mice, it is almost always worth throwing as much money as you can at them. A good monitor will last you ~10 years, which for most gamers is 3-4 PC builds. So if you look at a $1000 monitor, and divide it by 4 builds, you are actually looking at a cost of $250 per build, or over 10 years you are talking about $100/yr. Yes, it is a bit of money up front, but you get a lot more enjoyment out of the system, plus it will last a lot longer, which will save you money in the end.
A few things to look for:
-IPS. It should be a requirement. Yes, they are prone to slower transitions, but it is hardly noticeable on modern screens that use newer IPS technologies.
-High pixel density. My current monitor is a 27" 1920x1200. It made sense to get it when I bought it because I use to sit a lot further from my screen so size was what mattered more than resolution, but now that I sit a little closer I am annoyed at just how huge the pixels are, which makes me need to use higher AA in games. Also, for web browsing I use to be able to fit 2 full pages side by side when I purchased it 5 years ago... but now that everyone has wide screen monitors web pages have gotten wider, which means that I have to do a bit of side scrolling to see a full page... that is not an issue with higher resolution screens.
Pick whatever size you want/need first, and then find the model that offers the highest resolution for the size. AA becomes less of an issue, text becomes clearer, and pictures have more of a photo quality to them that you just don't get with low DPI monitors.
-White backlights! LED backlights are nice and white, with a very wide color spectrum which makes things really nice. Traditional CCD backlights always make things seem a bit yellow heavy and simply do not have the same *pop* that newer led displays have.

8) cooling. Gaming PCs do not need to be (nor should they be) loud anymore. Oversized air coolers, and good water cooling systems are cheap enough where they are more than worth the silence they bring. Most cooling parts you can install down the road, but you should absolutely get a GPU that comes with a custom cooler pre-installed.
Other than the GPU, you can get everything else later:
- CPU air or water cooler. Get this before you OC. SB-E chips do not come with coolers, so if you go that route you will need one immediately. If you go the Ivy Bridge route then the Intel box cooler is fine for stock performance, but needs to be upgraded before OCing.
-Case fans. Get the biggest quietest fans that will fit in your case
-Fan controller. Get a single fan controller that can handle everything you have rather than running them off of the mobo. My system does not produce a ton of heat, so I have all of my fans set at their minimum 6-800RPM in my computer, but if you are putting out more heat, or are in a warmer environment, then consider getting a controller with some intelligence which can speed up fans when needed.

Anywho, hope that helps!


First, I already have the 7870 in my old system, and yes i have thought about buying two. Second I have heard (don't know if true) that the speed of you HDD/SSD doesn't really matter for anything but loading time if you have enough fast ram. Third i think i am convinst with the i5 and asrock z77. Btw. thanks for the long reply :D 
January 20, 2013 5:13:11 PM

give me a number in euros, i need something to work with.

January 20, 2013 5:20:18 PM

crahs8 said:
First, I already have the 7870 in my old system, and yes i have thought about buying two. Second I have heard (don't know if true) that the speed of you HDD/SSD doesn't really matter for anything but loading time if you have enough fast ram. Third i think i am convinst with the i5 and asrock z77. Btw. thanks for the long reply :D 

Yes, SSDs affect loading time only, but if you want a modern feeling system then you will need an SSD to do it. It will not help a bit for your FPS, but faster load times make the transitions nice and tight, and for larger sprawling games it helps combat the 'pop in' of objects on the screen.

An SSD simply makes your computer feel as fast as it really is.
January 20, 2013 5:21:54 PM

iceclock said:
give me a number in euros, i need something to work with.

aprox 1000
January 20, 2013 6:14:17 PM

So i just motiver that the 3570k only has 6m cache wouldn't that hit the performance? I don't know that much about cpus so i might be totally wrong.
January 20, 2013 6:19:06 PM

are u gonna want to sli or crossfire? and overclock?

January 20, 2013 6:29:10 PM

iceclock said:
are u gonna want to sli or crossfire? and overclock?
I have maybe thought ajour buying a second gpu in like an year or a half.
January 20, 2013 6:37:53 PM

an i5-3570k has virtually identical FPS as an i7 in most games. The only reason for an i7 is if you were video editing. The i5 will last you 5 years or more, depending on if you overclock it. Honestly, I wouldn't crossfire or sli because I feel like it would bring up more issues than what you get of it. your opinion, though.
January 20, 2013 6:46:15 PM

do u need monitor and windows?

January 20, 2013 10:06:35 PM

NerdBBQ said:
an i5-3570k has virtually identical FPS as an i7 in most games. The only reason for an i7 is if you were video editing. The i5 will last you 5 years or more, depending on if you overclock it. Honestly, I wouldn't crossfire or sli because I feel like it would bring up more issues than what you get of it. your opinion, though.

Exactly, even an i3 when paired with a GPU is typically 'good enough' for getting 60fps on most games. An i5 (especially when OCd) has enough kick to future proof your machine for a bit.
An i7 gives a bit of a cache boost, but we are talking about a 1-2fps gain at most, and typically the performance is negligible.

So go for an i5, but after that throw all your money in the GPU.
January 21, 2013 4:15:23 AM

CaedenV said:
Exactly, even an i3 when paired with a GPU is typically 'good enough' for getting 60fps on most games. An i5 (especially when OCd) has enough kick to future proof your machine for a bit.
An i7 gives a bit of a cache boost, but we are talking about a 1-2fps gain at most, and typically the performance is negligible.

So go for an i5, but after that throw all your money in the GPU.

OK just advice for oc. Would i be able to oc it to 4.0 GHz?
January 21, 2013 4:20:32 AM

crahs8 whats ur total budget? and do u neeed windows and lcd?
January 21, 2013 4:20:37 AM

iceclock said:
do u need monitor and windows?

I do have keyboard and all that, my old computer have Windows 7 home premium 64 bit, so i guess i'll have to buy it again. Btw. Sorry for any spelling mistakes, Damm autocorrect.
January 21, 2013 4:21:09 AM

so total budget?

January 21, 2013 4:25:38 AM

i5 3570k can be OCed easily to 4.3-4.5
with cooler 212 evo :) 

make sure your room has relatively cool temperature
January 21, 2013 5:43:40 AM

iceclock said:
so total budget?

like 900 euros or so bare in mind that i already have the gpu
January 21, 2013 5:59:25 AM

AMD Radeon said:
i5 3570k can be OCed easily to 4.3-4.5
with cooler 212 evo :) 

make sure your room has relatively cool temperature

Does the cpu come with stock cooler, if so will i be able to oc it with that?
January 21, 2013 6:05:35 AM

stock cooler is for stock clock... need custom cooler for OC

212 evo isnt that expensive, usually 25 usd
January 21, 2013 6:49:44 AM

AMD Radeon said:
stock cooler is for stock clock... need custom cooler for OC

212 evo isnt that expensive, usually 25 usd

Ok i'll buy the Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo and Btw. i'm going to buy a Xfx psu do you think i need 700 or 850 w?
January 21, 2013 7:00:47 AM

afaik, xfx psu comes with 450 550 650 750 850

pick anything you can afford. personally, i will go with xfx 750 silver

or xfx 850 silver for dual graphic card
January 21, 2013 10:47:37 AM

AMD Radeon said:
afaik, xfx psu comes with 450 550 650 750 850

pick anything you can afford. personally, i will go with xfx 750 silver

or xfx 850 silver for dual graphic card

I can see i can get Corsair Hydro Series H70 CORE fairly cheap, should i buy it instead of the 212 evo?
January 21, 2013 10:55:47 AM

no no no any liquid cooler is mostly avoided. it is very problematic. i used to have corsair h60 and for just 3 days, swithed to 212 evo

couldnt bear its noisy pump...

i believe it is hit and miss
some ppl could live with it
January 21, 2013 11:42:42 AM

AMD Radeon said:
no no no any liquid cooler is mostly avoided. it is very problematic. i used to have corsair h60 and for just 3 days, swithed to 212 evo

couldnt bear its noisy pump...

i believe it is hit and miss
some ppl could live with it


Last questions before i think i'm ready to order the parts: Do you think is should get 16gb or 8gb ram and if 16gb should i get 4x4 or 2x8 (Hyperx Predator Beast or just Predator?). Second, can you use an asus 7870 and a XFX side by side?
January 21, 2013 12:09:28 PM

i think you should get corsair/gskill ram with 2x8 ddr3 1600 :) 

kingston has "compatibility issue" with ram voltage

safe voltage should be 1,5v
most kingston has 1,65
January 21, 2013 12:56:11 PM

Ok, i think the build is finished:

OS: Microsoft windows 7 home premium 64 bit
Disc Drive: LiteOn iHAS124
HDD: Western Digital HD Caviar Blue 1tb
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 8gb (2x4)
GPU: Asus Radeon hd 7870 (Maybe add a second in the future)
Case: Coolermaster HAF X
CPU: Intel Core i5 3570k
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Exteme4
Powersuply: XFX PSU 850W ProSeries XXX EDITION
Aftermarket cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo

Thanks to everyone who sent me advice :D 
January 21, 2013 1:09:14 PM

Looks fine to me. Good luck!
January 21, 2013 1:11:44 PM

Well, I honestly wouldn't spend $200 on a chassis. There are plenty of cheaper full towers available and you could probably even get a mid tower, that way you can save up to get that 2nd graphics card.
January 21, 2013 1:58:13 PM

looks good dude here my suggestion.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yMlQ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yMlQ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yMlQ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (€204.90 @ Amazon France)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0564 101.6 CFM CPU Cooler (€44.34 @ Amazon France)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (€124.90 @ Amazon France)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (€44.59 @ Amazon France)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 3 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (€99.88 @ Amazon France)
Storage: Seagate SV35.5 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (€86.77 @ Amazon France)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DG 24-bit 96 KHz Sound Card (€33.89 @ Amazon France)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS-I ID ATX Mid Tower Case (€53.31 @ Amazon France)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (€84.89 @ Amazon France)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (€28.00 @ Amazon France)
Other: win7 x64 (€94.00)
Total: €899.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-21 16:57 CET+0100)

Total: €899.47

better cooler. got u an ssd. good mid-tower case. good 620 watt ps 850 is excessive even if u add a second 7870.

:) 

January 21, 2013 2:33:19 PM

NerdBBQ said:
Well, I honestly wouldn't spend $200 on a chassis. There are plenty of cheaper full towers available and you could probably even get a mid tower, that way you can save up to get that 2nd graphics card.

Can you give an example? I have looked at the haf 932.
January 21, 2013 2:34:37 PM

crahs if i made some changes i could get u a second 6870 but do u prefer that over a ssd drive?

January 21, 2013 3:38:29 PM

iceclock said:
crahs if i made some changes i could get u a second 6870 but do u prefer that over a ssd drive?

I already added a 60gb ssd to the list for windows and btw it's a 7870. The only thing i am still debating is the case.
January 21, 2013 4:06:09 PM

Rosewill Thor v2, the HAF 932, and Thermaltake Chaser are all good full towers.
For a mid tower, Rosewill Challenger, maybe Cooler Master Elite 430, but I personally own an NZXT Source 210 and love it. If you do get the Source 210, make sure it's the v2 with USB 3.0 headers.
January 21, 2013 4:13:17 PM

crahs8 said:
OK just advice for oc. Would i be able to oc it to 4.0 GHz?

You can OC locked (non K) i5 and i7 CPUs up to 4.2GHz (Technically up to 4.5GHz if you mess with BLCK... but that is not suggested). Note that this is using Intel Turbo Boost, so it will not clock up until there is a workload on the CPU, and it is thermally limited, so if the chip starts getting hot (~65*c) then it will step back a bit. This is what I do on my rig, and with a Hyper 212 Evo cooler with 2 low rpm fans my system idles at 1.6GHz, and once I put a load on it I am always at 3.9-4.2GHz without issue, even on sustained loads. The nice thing is that it is automatic, and the power is there when you need it, and the system idles when you don't need it. The bad thing about it is that there is no direct way to control the clock or voltages which can be annoying for power users.

If you get a K series CPU then you have a lot more control, and you ought to be able to hit 4.5GHz on just about any chip, and there is potential to hit up to ~5GHz if you really want to push the system. This would allow you to manually set the speed of the machine so that you are guaranteed the full clock rate at all times (until something catches on fire).

Either way, here is what you would need:
1) An i5 or i7 LGA 1155 CPU, preferably a K series
2) A motherboard with a z68 or z77 chipset (preferably and ASUS or ASRock z77 board)
3) An aftermarket CPU cooler
4) the ability to do a bit of research online about best practices for OCing (It is not hard... but if you do something dumb and short sighted then you can destroy your hardware)

Most motherboards in the $120+ (USD) range ought to be able to OC to 4.5GHz without issue on most CPUs. Higher end boards have better voltage regulation, so they offer more potential to OC a little further, but honestly 4GHz is plenty for gaming
Almost all i5 and i7 chips can hit 4.2GHz, while almost all K series chips can hit 4.5GHz, but anything beyond that is just the luck of the draw.
Most $20-30 heat sinks are more than adequate to cool an Intel chip. Higher priced heat sinks are mostly just for looks, noise level, or epeen, but tend not to offer much in the way of additional cooling performance. If this is your first build then I would highly suggest a Hyper 212+ or 212 Evo as they are cheap and effective, then if you want something more than that you can always upgrade later once you get a feel for what you really want to do (oversized air cooler, CLC, or a custom water cooling loop)


After you get things all set up, be sure to do some multiple day benchmarks on your system to ensure that everything is functioning properly. I used Intel Burn Test on my system for 2 days to make sure things worked properly, and everything worked out beautifully.
January 21, 2013 4:47:00 PM

NerdBBQ said:
Rosewill Thor v2, the HAF 932, and Thermaltake Chaser are all good full towers.
For a mid tower, Rosewill Challenger, maybe Cooler Master Elite 430, but I personally own an NZXT Source 210 and love it. If you do get the Source 210, make sure it's the v2 with USB 3.0 headers.

i liked the look of the rosewill but it's not avalible where i'm buying my parts (no Rosewills in fact :(  )
January 21, 2013 4:48:30 PM

CaedenV said:
You can OC locked (non K) i5 and i7 CPUs up to 4.2GHz (Technically up to 4.5GHz if you mess with BLCK... but that is not suggested). Note that this is using Intel Turbo Boost, so it will not clock up until there is a workload on the CPU, and it is thermally limited, so if the chip starts getting hot (~65*c) then it will step back a bit. This is what I do on my rig, and with a Hyper 212 Evo cooler with 2 low rpm fans my system idles at 1.6GHz, and once I put a load on it I am always at 3.9-4.2GHz without issue, even on sustained loads. The nice thing is that it is automatic, and the power is there when you need it, and the system idles when you don't need it. The bad thing about it is that there is no direct way to control the clock or voltages which can be annoying for power users.

If you get a K series CPU then you have a lot more control, and you ought to be able to hit 4.5GHz on just about any chip, and there is potential to hit up to ~5GHz if you really want to push the system. This would allow you to manually set the speed of the machine so that you are guaranteed the full clock rate at all times (until something catches on fire).

Either way, here is what you would need:
1) An i5 or i7 LGA 1155 CPU, preferably a K series
2) A motherboard with a z68 or z77 chipset (preferably and ASUS or ASRock z77 board)
3) An aftermarket CPU cooler
4) the ability to do a bit of research online about best practices for OCing (It is not hard... but if you do something dumb and short sighted then you can destroy your hardware)

Most motherboards in the $120+ (USD) range ought to be able to OC to 4.5GHz without issue on most CPUs. Higher end boards have better voltage regulation, so they offer more potential to OC a little further, but honestly 4GHz is plenty for gaming
Almost all i5 and i7 chips can hit 4.2GHz, while almost all K series chips can hit 4.5GHz, but anything beyond that is just the luck of the draw.
Most $20-30 heat sinks are more than adequate to cool an Intel chip. Higher priced heat sinks are mostly just for looks, noise level, or epeen, but tend not to offer much in the way of additional cooling performance. If this is your first build then I would highly suggest a Hyper 212+ or 212 Evo as they are cheap and effective, then if you want something more than that you can always upgrade later once you get a feel for what you really want to do (oversized air cooler, CLC, or a custom water cooling loop)


After you get things all set up, be sure to do some multiple day benchmarks on your system to ensure that everything is functioning properly. I used Intel Burn Test on my system for 2 days to make sure things worked properly, and everything worked out beautifully.

Thanks for the help, i will definitley be oc'ing my cpu to 4 ghz.
January 21, 2013 4:55:11 PM

here with better case and 60 ssd.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yNxq
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yNxq/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yNxq/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (€204.90 @ Amazon France)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0564 101.6 CFM CPU Cooler (€44.34 @ Amazon France)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (€124.90 @ Amazon France)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (€44.59 @ Amazon France)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 3 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (€67.99 @ Amazon France)
Storage: Seagate SV35.5 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (€86.77 @ Amazon France)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DG 24-bit 96 KHz Sound Card (€33.89 @ Amazon France)
Case: Fractal Design Core 3000 ATX Mid Tower Case (€62.89 @ Amazon France)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (€84.89 @ Amazon France)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (€28.00 @ Amazon France)
Other: win7 x64 (€94.00)
Total: €877.16
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-21 19:10 CET+0100)

Total: €877.16


get unlocked alot more stable and overclocks past 4.5 easy.

:) 

January 21, 2013 5:00:34 PM

WOW, maybe it's just my taste, but i just found the coolest case and it's cheap! Zalman Z11 Plus
January 21, 2013 5:08:00 PM

ok here.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yO9i
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yO9i/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/fr/p/yO9i/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (€204.90 @ Amazon France)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0564 101.6 CFM CPU Cooler (€44.34 @ Amazon France)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (€124.90 @ Amazon France)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (€44.59 @ Amazon France)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 3 60GB 2.5" Solid State Disk (€67.99 @ Amazon France)
Storage: Seagate SV35.5 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (€86.77 @ Amazon France)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DG 24-bit 96 KHz Sound Card (€33.89 @ Amazon France)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus ATX Mid Tower Case (€64.89 @ Amazon France)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (€84.89 @ Amazon France)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (€28.00 @ Amazon France)
Other: win7 x64 (€94.00)
Total: €879.16
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-21 20:07 CET+0100)

:D 

January 22, 2013 8:48:39 AM

So, would a XFX 7870 and an Asus 7870 work together?
January 22, 2013 1:15:06 PM

yes, are they both 2gigs or 1gig editions?

January 22, 2013 1:23:30 PM

iceclock said:
yes, are they both 2gigs or 1gig editions?

they're both 2 gigs
January 22, 2013 1:24:04 PM

that should work fine. u can mix and match same serie cards.

whats ur ps again?

!