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$2000 Gaming & Editing PC

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January 20, 2013 9:10:57 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: This Friday

Budget Range: $1850-$2300

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Editing

Are you buying a monitor: No

Do you need to buy OS: No

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Any trustworthy sites

Location: Orlando, Florida

Parts Preferences: Intel CPU, Nvidia Graphics

Overclocking: Definitely

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Your Monitor Resolution: Gaming at 1920x1080, but do plan on upgrading to dual monitors later on for productivity, I would still only game on 1 monitor

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I've gotten tired of console gaming, furthermore I have a YouTube channel and upload videos for a living, so my old computer won't cut it

Additional Comments: Don't have to include this in the budget for the build but could you guys recommend a good gaming mouse & keyboard?

More about : 2000 gaming editing

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January 20, 2013 9:33:59 PM

TheBigTroll said:
here ya go
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yES9

if you prefer switches with more resistance, i can recommend something else


You don't need a 3770K for a gaming rig, even the 3570K will handle editing tasks, I'd rather put that money in the GPU:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($192.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 950W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($125.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1834.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-20 18:33 EST-0500)
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January 20, 2013 9:39:27 PM

i know you dont need a i7, but if he does upload quite a few videos on youtube, it should be worth it.

id get a larger SSD rather than a faster one. from what i know, the windforce 2x cards arent nearly as good as the 3x version.
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January 20, 2013 9:41:57 PM

TheBigTroll said:
i know you dont need a i7, but if he does upload quite a few videos on youtube, it should be worth it.

id get a larger SSD rather than a faster one. from what i know, the windforce 2x cards arent nearly as good as the 3x version.


My iPad can upload and edit Youtube videos - that's something that doesn't require a lot of processing power. If the OP uses say Adobe Premiere or Sony Vegas - then you would need a lot of power for that.
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January 20, 2013 9:54:46 PM

Here's my suggestion, it's included gaming, video editing, all around build, for 1080p a single card will do :


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($309.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.76 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Logitech G9x Wired Laser Mouse ($66.12 @ Amazon)
Total: $1640.78
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
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January 20, 2013 10:46:19 PM

g-unit1111 said:
My iPad can upload and edit Youtube videos - that's something that doesn't require a lot of processing power. If the OP uses say Adobe Premiere or Sony Vegas - then you would need a lot of power for that.


Without clarification from the OP, I'll grant you that the point is arguable. Still, he did say that he edits/uploads videos for a living, so I don't think you can diminish that aspect of his build's performance for the sake of adding SLI to an already very strong gaming configuration.

A single 670 ought to run games @ 1080p extremely well for quite some time to come. Spending double the money now (on the graphics' subsystem) for the sake of a more future-proof setup seems self-defeating; the extra money can always be spent later (and more efficiently) when performance begins to sag.

FWIW, I'd go with django's configuration. The bigger SSD is a nice touch, and django leaves enough room in the budget to double the capacity if the OP really wanted to.
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January 20, 2013 10:53:15 PM

Quote:
Without clarification from the OP, I'll grant you that the point is arguable. Still, he did say that he edits/uploads videos for a living, so I don't think you can diminish that aspect of his build's performance for the sake of adding SLI to an already very strong gaming configuration.


That's true - point taken there. I'd have to know what software the OP uses for video editing before I would say go with the 3770K.

Quote:
A single 670 ought to run games @ 1080p extremely well for quite some time to come. Spending double the money now (on the graphics' subsystem) for the sake of a more future-proof setup seems self-defeating; the extra money can always be spent later (and more efficiently) when performance begins to sag.


Future proofing is a redundancy anyways since GPUs are constantly changing and so is the software that goes with it, it's difficult to keep up with what's out now, it will be impossible to predict what is going to be available in the future and how it compares with what's out now.

Quote:
FWIW, I'd go with django's configuration. The bigger SSD is a nice touch, and django leaves enough room in the budget to double the capacity if the OP really wanted to.


I'd personally pick a faster SSD over a bigger drive - you store everything on the secondary anyways. The biggest bottleneck in any system is always going to be your primary storage device. The Samsung 830 is good, but it's a bit old now. The OCZ Vector is the fastest drive on the market currently with the Samsung 840 Pro a very close second, so that's why I usually pick that drive.
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January 20, 2013 10:57:42 PM

I'd love to know what your YouTube channel is. It would be cool to see it all built from the help of the users here at Toms hardware.
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January 20, 2013 11:04:36 PM

I just thought id throw something in here

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($91.94 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Professional ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($194.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill NS Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($191.99 @ Adorama)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($419.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($419.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black/White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($98.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1891.82
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-20 20:04 EST-0500)
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January 20, 2013 11:07:19 PM

g-unit1111 said:


Future proofing is a redundancy anyways since GPUs are constantly changing and so is the software that goes with it, it's difficult to keep up with what's out now, it will be impossible to predict what is going to be available in the future and how it compares with what's out now.


Agreed. Better just to make your build as solid as possible based on what you know now.


I'd personally pick a faster SSD over a bigger drive - you store everything on the secondary anyways. The biggest bottleneck in any system is always going to be your primary storage device. The Samsung 830 is good, but it's a bit old now. The OCZ Vector is the fastest drive on the market currently with the Samsung 840 Pro a very close second, so that's why I usually pick that drive. said:

I'd personally pick a faster SSD over a bigger drive - you store everything on the secondary anyways. The biggest bottleneck in any system is always going to be your primary storage device. The Samsung 830 is good, but it's a bit old now. The OCZ Vector is the fastest drive on the market currently with the Samsung 840 Pro a very close second, so that's why I usually pick that drive.


Granted, the 840 is better, but given the choice between micromanaging files for use on a lightning-fast ~120GB SSD, and not micromanaging files on a slower ~500GB SSD, I've gotta go with the latter. Qualitatively, pretty much all SSDs seem ridiculously fast in practice, so my priorities for SSDs are (in order):

1. Reliability (Anything Samsung is a good bet here, as far as I'm concerned.)
2. Capacity (and/or Capacity per Dollar)
3. Performance

As always, YMMV. I think the OP would be happy with any of the builds posted in this thread; it's just a matter of figuring out which one would make him happiest. :) 
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January 20, 2013 11:09:56 PM

the 840 non pro is crap
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January 20, 2013 11:19:40 PM

TheBigTroll said:
the 840 non pro is crap


Not a big fan of TLC NAND, huh?

Can't say I blame you, but everything I've heard about the 840 (both pro and non-pro -- and pre-launch hiccup notwithstanding) seems positive.

YMMV. In any case, the OP could easily grab up another SSD. I like Intel, personally.
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January 20, 2013 11:26:06 PM

its 10 bucks more for 2000 more write cycles and much better write performance. id go for it.

also note there are other sandforce drives that use sync flash (some have toggle) and still cost less per gig than the 840 right now
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January 20, 2013 11:29:43 PM

Fulgurant said:
Agreed. Better just to make your build as solid as possible based on what you know now.



Granted, the 840 is better, but given the choice between micromanaging files for use on a lightning-fast ~120GB SSD, and not micromanaging files on a slower ~500GB SSD, I've gotta go with the latter. Qualitatively, pretty much all SSDs seem ridiculously fast in practice, so my priorities for SSDs are (in order):

1. Reliability (Anything Samsung is a good bet here, as far as I'm concerned.)
2. Capacity (and/or Capacity per Dollar)
3. Performance

As always, YMMV. I think the OP would be happy with any of the builds posted in this thread; it's just a matter of figuring out which one would make him happiest. :) 


I personally wouldn't store the micro-managed files on the SSD - and the higher capacity you go the slower they are (generally). I always try to give the best cost per GB solution out there - especially since there's a lot of expensive and overrated devices out there (OCZ Revodrive, WD Velociraptor) that give no performance benefit over standard storage options.
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January 20, 2013 11:42:11 PM

g-unit1111 said:
I personally wouldn't store the micro-managed files on the SSD - and the higher capacity you go the slower they are (generally). I always try to give the best cost per GB solution out there - especially since there's a lot of expensive and overrated devices out there (OCZ Revodrive, WD Velociraptor) that give no performance benefit over standard storage options.


Interesting. My understanding is that the opposite is true (at least up to a point, which is generally unobtainable for the average consumer right now anyway). Or is the bolded statement a typo?

In any case, when I talk about micromanaging, I'm talking about programs. Obviously, the amount of space you need to accomodate your programs will vary depending on your usage habits, but a 128GB drive would be too small for me, for what it's worth. I'd constantly have to offload game installations to my HDD(s); various tricks like this tool make the job easier, but it's not a task with which I'm enamored.

(Agreed on the overrated devices though -- and also agreed with TheBigTroll's point. Definitely go with the 840 Pro over the non-Pro if the price difference isn't a deal breaker)
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January 21, 2013 12:06:45 AM

when g-unit means generally, im pretty sure that means drives that are based on a sandforce controller

other drives might also be slower, but depends how well the controller handles the NAND
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January 21, 2013 12:30:48 AM

Video Editing warrants investment in two things ..... Hyperthreading and CUDA so you'll want an i7 and nVidia graphics

Case / PSU
Case - $213 - Corsair Carbide 500R http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
PSU - inc w/ case - Corsair HX850

$67 in savings ($25 combo discount, $30 in rebates and 10% off w/ EMCXWWN93 + free USB drive, limited offer ) for a 10.0 rated PSU and 9.25 rated case

Quote:
MoBo / CPU


It appears this machine will be used hard, video editing by day and gaming by night. In systems that receive this kind of heavy usage I would consider a workstation class board given that your budget allows the extra cost w/ room to spare. Read this for why you'd get a WS class board

http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/asus_p8z77_ws/1...

MoBo - $652 - ASUS P8Z77-WS http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
CPU - incl w/ Mobo - Intel Core i7-3770K

If ya don't think ya need all that rugged-ability, flexibility and power, I'd recommend the Sabertooth for $122 less for the Combo ... not as heavy duty as the WS but has a 5 year warranty and a 425 discount code.

$530 http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
10% off w/ MBZ7701170123

Cooler / TIM

The Phanteks shares top honors with the DH-14 and the noise of the H100 puts it outta consideration for a machine you sit at 10+ hours a day. The Phanteks has a 5 year warranty compared with the Noc's one year and they in different worlds in the aesthetics department. Shin Etsu shares top honors w/ As5 but has none of AS5's curing problems

Cooler - $80 - Phanteks PH-TC14PE http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
TIM - $5 - Shin Etsu http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SSD / HD

Again, reliability the key here so going with 5 year warranty HD and stable SSD

HD - $180 Caviar Black 2TB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
SSD - $240 - Samsung 840 pro http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Graphics
Ya don't need it but ya budget allows for SLI .... I'd start w/o it

GFX - $390 - Asus GTX 670 DCII http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM

Adobe says performance plateaus at 24GB. I'd start w/ 16GB and see if I need more.

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/3/917420

Other

Budget allows so we have a Blue Ray Burner and Card Reader

Card Reader $40 AFT ard Reader http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OS - incl w/ MoBo - Win 7-64 Home Premium http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Total w/ the Workstation Motherboard is $1,970 .... well under your budget.
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January 21, 2013 12:40:50 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($364.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($104.55 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG UH12LS29 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($65.20 @ Mwave)
Total: $1854.60
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-20 21:40 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1957.35
Combo Discounts: -$20.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$40.00
Shipping: $15.75
Total: $1913.10

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January 21, 2013 12:48:20 AM

djangoringo said:
Here's my suggestion, it's included gaming, video editing, all around build, for 1080p a single card will do :


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($309.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.76 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($87.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Logitech G9x Wired Laser Mouse ($66.12 @ Amazon)
Total: $1640.78
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
+1
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January 21, 2013 12:56:20 AM

iceclock said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yH0W/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($99.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($364.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($104.55 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG UH12LS29 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($65.20 @ Mwave)
Total: $1854.60
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-20 21:40 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1957.35
Combo Discounts: -$20.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$40.00
Shipping: $15.75
Total: $1913.10


the L12 wont squat for 2011. maybe but you wont get good temps.

larger SSD is cheaper. and there are better SSDs than the chronos non deluxe

ram should be bought in a kit of 4 to ensure compatability

i wouldnt trust asrock for a 2011 rig, but some people might

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January 21, 2013 1:12:32 AM

again u hate on asrock, when its one of the top 5 in quality motherboard makers today.

6core is def handy in editing. :) 

theres no cheaper and larger ssd than chronos at that price thats better.

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January 21, 2013 1:36:56 AM

^ lol theres only like 6 mobo makers.
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January 21, 2013 1:45:08 AM

iceclock said:
There's no cheaper and larger ssd than chronos at that price thats better.


I have installed quite a few Chronos Deluxe and a few non deluxe.... the premium toshiba toggle mode flash is about the best there is for both extended long life and performance..... but the non-deluxe doesn't have it.

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/4328/mushkin_chronos_d...

Quote:
The Chronos brand is a low cost offering and uses asynchronous flash with a SandForce SF-2281 controller. Today we are looking at the stepped up Chronos Deluxe model that uses the same SandForce SF-2281, but pairs it with premium 3Xnm Toshiba Toggle Mode Flash......

There are two important factors to keep in mind about the Muskin Chronos Deluxe. The first has to do with the flash used; 3Xnm Toshiba Toggle Mode NAND. This flash has a much longer lifespan than the 25nm IMFT flash that resides in many of today's SandForce SF-2281 controlled products.....

Other than a few really oddball entries, SF-2281 'consumer' SSDs come in three flash flavors. Starting on the low end, you have IMFT 25nm asynchronous flash, a budget flash used in the Agility 3, Force 3, Chronos (non-Deluxe model) and a few other drives that in our testing perform at around the same level as last year's SF-1200 controlled drives when filled to 50 percent capacity.

At this time there are very few consumer SSDs that use Toshiba Toggle Flash; you can count those available in the US on one hand - Vertex 3 Max IOPS Edition, Patriot WildFire, OWC Mercury Extreme Pro 6G (240GB capacity size only).....

To sum it all up with a bow on top, you get amazing performance, extremely long service life and a hassle free low price point on a drive that literally has very little competition in the marketplace
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January 21, 2013 2:29:06 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yIf1
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yIf1/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yIf1/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-L12 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($74.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe MX 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe MX 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($364.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($104.55 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG UH12LS29 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($65.20 @ Mwave)
Total: $1894.62
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-20 23:28 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1997.37
Combo Discounts: -$20.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$40.00
Shipping: $15.75
Total: $1953.12

hopefully this should be better.


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January 21, 2013 4:40:35 AM

Hmmm. Great suggestions from everyone!

To clarify about software, depending on the project, I use programs ranging from Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, Cinema 4D, Sony Vegas, or Maya!

This is the build I'm currently thinking about, any recommendations or modifications on this part list would be much appreciated :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($165.59 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Adorama)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card ($419.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower Case ($100.53 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Sony AD-7280S-0B DVD/CD Writer ($25.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $2012.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-21 01:38 EST-0500)
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 4:54:09 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yJFE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yJFE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yJFE/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80 92.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($228.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston Black 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($70.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Kingston Black 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($70.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card ($419.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Antec Eleven Hundred ATX Full Tower Case ($99.43 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($122.75 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Sony AD-7280S-0B DVD/CD Writer ($25.97 @ Newegg)
Total: $1868.57
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-21 01:53 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1983.09
Combo Discounts: -$20.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$40.00
Shipping: $6.98
Total: $1930.07

same quality but saves u a few bucks :) 

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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 10:01:56 AM

you dont need a x79 rig unless you are doing this 6 hrs a day or you are making quite a bit of money off of the rig

i really couldnt give a jack if they are one of the biggest makers. what matters is that they are still using the inferior analog circuitry compared to the competitions digital. they do have digital ones but they tend to cost more than what others can offer

ram is to be bought in a package of 4 if you need 4 sticks right a way. more compatible

sandisk extreme is the same as the mushkin, just cheaper

like i said, x79 is for when you actually make money off of this computer or you are doing this at least 6 hrs a day. the 5-10sec difference between this and a z77 rig has to be made up in time saved. otherwise you are wasting money
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/yLd1
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 1:41:38 PM

whats the biggest difference difference between analog and digital circuitry, first time i hear of this, the sandisk is 4$ less lol,

oh i disagree. theyres gonna be a good difference 6core and 4core rendering speed.
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January 21, 2013 2:08:56 PM

Best answer selected by cesartalks.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 2:13:03 PM

cheers cesar.even do 4core+4ht threads of a i7 3770k is nice, if ur doing rendering and 3d developpement that extra 2 cores is great and when overclocked hello nothint can even touch it.

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a c 278 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 6:45:16 PM

TheBigTroll said:
when g-unit means generally, im pretty sure that means drives that are based on a sandforce controller

other drives might also be slower, but depends how well the controller handles the NAND


:lol: 

No I mean that once a drive reaches over 80% capacity that's when it gets slow - and when you overload a 480 or 512GB SSD it can lead to bad things. Mechanical hard drives can take a lot more punishment than SSDs can in terms of read - write cycles.
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January 21, 2013 6:47:17 PM

g-unit1111 said:
:lol: 

No I mean that once a drive reaches over 80% capacity that's when it gets slow - and when you overload a 480 or 512GB SSD it can lead to bad things.


Ah yes, that's true. You want to keep some free space available to allow for consistent high performance.

But higher capacity SSDs are generally faster than lower-capacity SSDs. :) 
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 6:47:27 PM

im pretty shur any ssd is like that thats why u wanna keep freespace under 80% full.

wonder if they will fix this in the future and offer some type of defrag tool equivalent to the mechanical drives.

theres trim and a few tweaks but thats pretty weak.

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January 21, 2013 6:53:33 PM

iceclock said:
im pretty shur any ssd is like that thats why u wanna keep freespace under 80% full.

wonder if they will fix this in the future and offer some type of defrag tool equivalent to the mechanical drives.

theres trim and a few tweaks but thats pretty weak.


Anandtech did some testing on that recently. Different controllers will perform differently, but yeah, generally you want to keep 20-25% space open, regardless of the SSD's max capacity, in order to keep consistent performance and to prevent undue stress to the NAND.

In any case, obviously, more capacity is always better.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
January 21, 2013 6:54:58 PM

+1 to gmoney and fulgu.

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