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ASUS GeForce GTX 670 DirectCU II vs DirectCU II Top

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Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 6, 2012 12:31:41 PM

Anyone know how much of a difference there is between the ASUS GeForce GTX 670 DirectCU II and the ASUS GeForce GTX 670 DirectCU II TOP?

More about : asus geforce gtx 670 directcu directcu top

a b U Graphics card
December 6, 2012 12:41:49 PM

Livingston said:
Anyone know how much of a difference there is between the ASUS GeForce GTX 670 DirectCU II and the ASUS GeForce GTX 670 DirectCU II TOP?


Core clock differences. Default GTX 670 is at 915 Mhz core base frequency. The TOP edition is ASUS's factory OC'd edition clocked at 1058 Mhz base frequency, possibly a few more depending on your luck of the draw. The VRAM speeds are identical, the coolers, boards, etc, are identical. Obviously the TOP edition is a slightly ASUS-binned GTX 670.
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December 6, 2012 1:12:54 PM

Is the DirectCU II (non TOP) just a stock GTX 670 or has it also been OCed and/or modded with better cooling etc compared to a stock card?
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a b U Graphics card
December 6, 2012 2:26:12 PM

Well that ASUS is better than reference cards. Its cooler /quieter. About performance check the clocks
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a b U Graphics card
December 6, 2012 5:03:56 PM

Livingston said:
Is the DirectCU II (non TOP) just a stock GTX 670 or has it also been OCed and/or modded with better cooling etc compared to a stock card?


Clocks are the same as stock for the non-TOP edition.

As for the heatsink/fan, the ASUS GTX670 is not reference. It is quieter and cooler than stock squirrel-cage blower. BUT, it doesn't exhaust the hot air outside like the stock.

Which one you want is totally dependent on your case cooling. If your case doesn't have a good air flow (mostly push) to shove the hot air exhausted by the GPU outside, or the clearance between the card and the bottom of the case or the next card is very shallow, then the ASUS design (or any other design like it) won't work well for you. That design requires some room to breathe, and a few open slots underneath on the back of the case for venting with some case fans in the front of the GPU to direct air towards it and to the outside.

As for the PCB, the ASUS PCBs are usually custom, even for stock clocked editions. They have enough in-house engineering capacity to design and layout their own multi-layer PCBs. This isn't ALWAYS good for you, depending on what you want. You really NEED to compare the layout and design to draw your own conclusion. For example, a LOT of custom designed (not only ASUS, but also Gigabyte and MSI, etc) previous generation cards featured analog VRMs where as the reference featured digital VRMs. Whether or not you want one over the other depends on what it is that you think is important. MSI custom designs, for example, has some unwanted potential longevity issues with some recent 600 series cards, that at Nvidia's insistence, MSI reverted.

As for their current generation cards, I'm not sure which is better, although USUALLY ASUS custom designs are quite good (ASUS support sucks, but design is good). If you want really good support, try EVGA instead (so I have heard), it is up to you.
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December 7, 2012 12:01:38 AM

Well I'm buying a completely new build from scratch, so I can basically get whatever I need to make it work.

The only thing I've decided for the system so far is:

Monitor: Asus PB278Q
CPU: i5-3570k
GPU: x2 GTX 670 in SLI

From what I've read the Asus DirectCU II TOP is one of the best 670 cards out there. The only problem for me is finding two that are actually in stock in Australia.

So I was wondering how close the non TOP edition was, but it looks like that's not what I'm looking for...
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2012 10:43:18 AM

http://www.mwave.com.au/product/sku-aa77592-asus_geforc...

Well get 2 of these and you will be ok !

About the mobo (just trying to help you)

Z77 chipsets (Asrock Z77 Extrem 4)

Psu : As 2 of these cards need ~324W on peak

Corsair Tx 750 V2 with 4x PCIe connectors is enough for your rig.(the 650W have only 2 PCIe)

As you are gaming 8 Gb of 1600 Ram are enough .



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December 7, 2012 10:57:51 AM

I was looking at the ASUS Maximus V Formula for the motherboard, though I think may be a bit of an overkill...
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2012 11:11:00 AM

Well you dont need such a mobo (you plan 3 way sli ?)

BUT if you have that money you can get it.

Aslo dont forget to add a SSD
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December 7, 2012 12:12:13 PM

I was looking at it more for the OC features and the aesthetics of the design.
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2012 12:14:28 PM

Well if you got the cash get it.
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2012 1:20:39 PM

Livingston said:
I was looking at the ASUS Maximus V Formula for the motherboard, though I think may be a bit of an overkill...


Apparently these ASUS boards have the highest return/RMA rates at a large local retail store. Try the ASUS Sabertooth instead, I'd suggest.

The clock speed differences between the TOP and non-TOP editions are not big. You'll be paying disproportionately more money for that extra bit of clock speed. Just as well, as per Newegg.com, there are a lot of instabilities related to this TOP edition, probably related to the OC. There is a reason why Nvidia is particularly uptight about Kepler overclocking and vcore voltages. For what it is worth, the TOP edition looks to be discontinued (maybe due to Nvidia's hand or instabilities), see the feedbacks here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121638
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December 7, 2012 2:24:16 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Apparently these ASUS boards have the highest return/RMA rates at a large local retail store. Try the ASUS Sabertooth instead, I'd suggest.


That's a shame as I was really stoked about the features on that board. Would that be the same case then with the ASUS Maximus V Extreme?

The Sabertooth was actually the first board that really got my attention, but then I read from a couple people on these forums that the thermal armor was just a cheap gimmick, being a simple plastic cover, and that it actually makes the board run hotter. As I'm already using an IB chip, I definitely don't want the added heat...

That said, they didn't mention what source this info was based on, so I don't know if that's true or not. All the reviews I read on it were good, but none of them were testing it for extended times.

Maxx_Power said:
The clock speed differences between the TOP and non-TOP editions are not big. You'll be paying disproportionately more money for that extra bit of clock speed. Just as well, as per Newegg.com, there are a lot of instabilities related to this TOP edition, probably related to the OC. There is a reason why Nvidia is particularly uptight about Kepler overclocking and vcore voltages. For what it is worth, the TOP edition looks to be discontinued (maybe due to Nvidia's hand or instabilities), see the feedbacks here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121638


Hmm does that mean that it's likely to burn out if I try OCing the non TOP version myself?
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2012 5:35:13 PM

Livingston said:
That's a shame as I was really stoked about the features on that board. Would that be the same case then with the ASUS Maximus V Extreme?

The Sabertooth was actually the first board that really got my attention, but then I read from a couple people on these forums that the thermal armor was just a cheap gimmick, being a simple plastic cover, and that it actually makes the board run hotter. As I'm already using an IB chip, I definitely don't want the added heat...

That said, they didn't mention what source this info was based on, so I don't know if that's true or not. All the reviews I read on it were good, but none of them were testing it for extended times.



What I know from reviews is that the thermal armor itself is a gimmick. To have it working properly, you NEED to install that little bundled fan to cool the components underneath. HOWEVER, the main reason I'd recommend that board over the Maximus (ROG series, I suppose), is for the 2 years extra warranty for a total of 5 years. The thermal armor can be removed if desired, or if you don't mind the small fan, you can always install that. I for one, have dealt with the wrath of ASUS support. I know their products are typically well engineered and made, so I still make ASUS purchases when their product is the best for my requirements. However, when you use their support, you'll see why some have migrated away from ASUS over the last few years. Having this in mind, and the knowledge from my local retail store/services guys that the ROG series (Maximus, Gene, etc) have an abnormally high failure rate compared to the rest of the ASUS boards, I'd stick with something that has a higher probability of not requiring repairs down the road.

As an alternative, I have read nothing but good things reliability, OC and feature wise of the MSI GD65 series. The guys at HardOCP (especially the founder - Kyle, I think), really likes the GD65 MSI series. If you ever thought of switching brands.

Livingston said:


Hmm does that mean that it's likely to burn out if I try OCing the non TOP version myself?


This I have no idea. Keplers aren't the most OC-friendly NV chips. I think this is due to Nvidia's late launch, and they had to counter AMD's GPUs performance and price wise. This was particularly hard when NV is retardedly late on their Kepler series. So to compensate, they had to jack up GPU clocks at launch, which means that given that there were rumours of Kepler yield issues (hence why there are multiple bins of the GTX680 via die harvesting), the extra margins on these Kepler chips aren't high. Nvidia probably validated them at a very high (relatively) Vcore and clock speeds, so vendors themselves can't push for much more. Nvidia is VERY insistent that no one tinkers with the GPU Vcore, for reasons we can only speculate. MSI, EVGA were both told to not allow user Vcore adjustments. This is what they said:

"
We support overvoltaging up to a limit on our products, but have a maximum reliability spec that is intended to protect the life of the product. We don’t want to see customers disappointed when their card dies in a year or two because the voltage was raised too high.
"

Taken from http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?283274-Nvidia-Response-to-GTX-Series-Voltage-Control&s=f99abaf402662c6ed6e76a5bbf0bf7a1

So you can perhaps guess why there aren't a lot of crazy clocked GTX's around, since no one is allowed to tinker (beyond a tiny margin) with their Vcores. Without playing with voltage, you really can't OC much. And per Nvidia, with Vcore control, you are looking at frying your card in 1 to 2 years of use.
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December 7, 2012 6:13:36 PM

Best answer selected by Livingston.
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December 7, 2012 6:14:04 PM

Thanks for the feeback.
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