Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Advice on cost efficient PC office build

Last response: in Systems
Share
January 22, 2013 3:36:37 AM

Hi Everyone,

I was just putting together a standard PC for one of the guys in my workplace, the work load wont be extremely heavy mostly MS Office, Internet Explorer and just a few file browsing windows. Office will be open all the time and there will be a possibility of having two monitors, unlikely, but a possibility. It will also be running Windows XP.

This is what i have put together so far for a cost effective mini-ITX build. We live in Australia so I apologise for the prices.


Samsung 840 Series 120GB SSD Retail Box - $109.00

G.Skill F3-12800CL9D-4GBNQ (2x2GB) DDR3 - $35.00

ASRock B75M-ITX Motherboard - $109.00

Intel Core i3 3225 - $135.00

Samsung SH-224BB/BEBS SATA DVDRW Drive OEM - $19.00

Seasonic S12II 430W Power Supply - $75.00

CoolerMaster Elite 120 Advanced Mini ITX Case - $59.00

Sub-total: $541.00


I was thinking maybe I could switch the SSD out for a 500GB HDD but we do have a storage network so I guess it'd be better to get the performance of a SSD for about $50 extra?

also, is there any dramatic performance drops in using a mini ITX board?

Anyway, let us know what you think and if you can make any changes to help improve it?

The website i buy from is www.pccasegear.com
January 22, 2013 3:48:32 AM

No need for a 3225. A 3220 or even Pentium 2120G would be fine. If he doesn't need the 500GB of storage then I would get the SSD. Though the performance increase from adding mine has been unnoticeable, so I would get a small HDD and use the savings for a better CPU, maybe an i5 3470? Form factor does not affect performance. What is the overall budget for the build?
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 4:00:13 AM

^ he need HD 4000, thus 3225 is the best choice

mini ITX board usually costly and less effective cooling

micro atx might be a better reasonable form factor. unless size if very critical in mind
m
0
l
Related resources
January 22, 2013 4:05:53 AM

Intel Core i3 3225
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($135)

ASRock H77M Motherboard
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($79)

SanDisk Extreme Solid State Drive 120GB
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($109)

Corsair CMV4GX3M2A1333C9 4GB (2x2GB) DDR3
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($29)

Antec VP-450P 450W Power Supply
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($52)

Thermaltake Black Commander MS-II Mid Tower Case
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($59)

Samsung SH-224BB/BEBS SATA DVDRW Drive OEM
http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_i...
($19)

around $401

@montosaurous
his build did not have a GPU so putting an i2 3220 is a fairly stupid idea because it doesnt have an integrated GPU inside of it
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 4:07:17 AM

^I'm surprised by that - every rig I've installed an SSD in has gotten noticeably faster to me. An i5 isn't really going to help for what it's being used for, though - I'd look at cutting costs.

This will feel just as fast to the user, and still has room for a 500GB drive if desired.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Pentium G2120 3.1GHz Dual-Core Processor ($93.07 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M-ITX Mini ITX LGA1155 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Mushkin Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($33.84 @ NCIX US)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Lian-Li PC-Q07 Mini ITX Tower Case ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 380W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $472.85
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-22 01:07 EST-0500)
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 4:10:10 AM

^ woaaa, very appealing mini itx build
can be bumped to i3 3225 though :) 
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 4:15:05 AM

^ Australian Build, PC Case Gear is the requested store.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Pentium G550 2.6GHz Dual-Core Processor ($45.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Motherboard: ASRock B75M-DGS Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($59.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Memory: Corsair 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($29.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109 @PCCaseGear)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Essential 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($19.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Total: $369.00
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-22 17:13 EST+1100)

Ahh, doesn't include shipping.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 4:23:02 AM

montosaurous said:
... I would get the SSD. Though the performance increase from adding mine has been unnoticeable...


How is that possible?
I have no doubt that an SSD is the best way to noticeably improve a HDD system. You sure you have it configured right? Because the difference between an SSD and HDD based systems is very apparent to me.
I just cant stand using HDD based systems now, I'm so used to how fast an SSD is.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 5:26:04 AM

manofchalk said:
^ Australian Build, PC Case Gear is the requested store.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Pentium G550 2.6GHz Dual-Core Processor ($45.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Motherboard: ASRock B75M-DGS Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($59.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Memory: Corsair 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($29.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109 @PCCaseGear)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Essential 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($19.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Total: $369.00
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-22 17:13 EST+1100)

Ahh, doesn't include shipping.


Does this CPU have onboard graphics? I'm unfamilliar with the pentium line. Also, I understand the jump in performance between HDD and SSD, I might stay with the SSD.
I'd like to point out that mini or micro ATX boards aren't required, i just figured that coolermaster tower would look decent in a business environment, i was just wondering whether there was a noticable performance difference between the mini/micro, and standard size boards. As much as i dislike CM products, that mini tower looked pretty decent for the money. And the guy im building it for is a salesman with next to no knowlege about computers so i doubt he'll discriminate brands.

My budget will be roughly $550 before shipping.

@ darksable, thanks for the help but as manofchalk said, I am based in australia, so most of those sites wont help me. :/ 

Thanks for all the help so far everyone, I'll look over all the builds recommended so far and take all into consideration.
if anyone can think of anything to add let me know.
Cheers,
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 5:34:59 AM

sorry I only just noticed that it says that it has 850mhz graphics. What would be the performance difference going from the celeron to an i3? and yes the reason I chose the initial cpu is because of the 4000 onboard graphics, that way I wont have to worry about a dedicated GPU.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 5:47:41 AM

Pretty much every mainstream Intel CPU for a long while has included integrated graphics, including this one.
Graphics performance doesn't overly matter for what the builds going to used for, rendering the desktop isn't intensive by any stretch.

CPU performance may play a role in how fast things work, though somewhat sure that office applications don't need that much in the way of processing power.

Difference between Micro and Standard ATX boards largely comes down to features. Performance difference between mothboards isn't even a consideration. TBH I only picked the board I did because it was cheap and had SATAIII ports. The case could fit an ATX size board if you wanted too.

You can get a different case if you want too, the heat output of these parts will be tiny, wouldn't require much in the way of cooling.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 6:20:01 AM

No worries, cheers for the insight, I had a feeling that was the case with motherboards, I just thought I'd make sure. Well we do run a remote desktop connection from time to time and he is fairly computer illiterate as I said before so he may have multiple things open at once, would it be worth getting an i3? or do you think the celeron will suffice even for that?
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 6:39:51 AM

One more question, do you think the silverstone PSU will be more reliable than the seasonic I've chosen? I understand that the PSU is one of the most crucial components to not cheap out on so I'd hate to get it and have it total all my hardware.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 7:30:22 AM

TBH I'm not sure, as you can imagine I don't advise for this low end of the market very often. I think the Celeron G550 (for some reason it says Pentium on the PartPicker link) will be fine, but if you want to play it safe you could get the i3-3220.

If budget isn't a constraint, get the Seasonic. Silverstone PSU's are fairly good but Seasonic is even better. And its Bronze efficiency over just 80+, that as well.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 9:40:07 AM

For $500 you can get an A10 too

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($135.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75M-DGS Micro ATX FM2 Motherboard ($75.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Memory: Patriot Viper II Sector 5 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($105.00 @ Scorptec)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 430 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Essential 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($22.00 @ PCCaseGear)
Total: $474.00
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-22 22:39 EST+1100)

Or if you downgrade to a dual core A4 it's $400.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:11:22 PM

I was actually going to look into getting AMD, I heard their onboard GPU was ahead of intel's HD4000 graphics is this correct? Also what differences will you notice going from an Intel CPU to a AMD CPU?
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:14:33 PM

vote for AMD apu build @finneousPJ build is awesome
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:24:45 PM

AMD Radeon said:
vote for AMD apu build @finneousPJ build is awesome


I'd like an explination why, if thats not too much to ask? what advantages do i have getting an AMD over an intel in this scenario?
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:28:49 PM

office/media playing using integrated GPU is the way AMD A10 was designed for. its iGPU is far more powerful than any intel GPU. it actually equals to 6670 or something dedicated graphic card
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:34:20 PM

Intel will be faster processing data, AMD will have smoother graphics. Intel will run cooler and more efficient. I think you should stick with Intel since you are not getting this for gaming. Celeron/Pentium should be sufficient for what you want to do, i3 series will be even better if you can afford it.

SSD will make a huge performance difference--probably the single biggest difference of any of the parts mentioned in this build. SSD is all the more appropriate since you don't need local storage.

DarkSable's build looks good to me but you can't go wrong with ManofChalk's either, just pick the parts from either build that you like the best.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:46:54 PM

Please don't take this in a bad way, I'm definitely keen to hear you're reasoning and I am putting together the build Finneous recommended as a wishlist because I am genuinely considering it, but I would like to hear this also from a person whos name isnt AMD Radeon. Just for the reason that I have had a fair few people up the top recommend Intel, its not that I dont trust your judgement, as I was actually looking into going with AMD but my lack of knowlege with that companies CPU department means I am naturally curious to see reasoning to go with either side.

I understand that I can get a quad core for the price of a dual core i3 which is a plus, but are there any downsides in this scenario? Sorry if it seems too much to ask, its just I will need to be 100% before I use my boss' money to build this PC. How reliable is AMD compared to Intel?

After re-reading this I realise what I said may sound harsh or a bit like I am biting the hand that feeds, please don't take it that way, I am just trying to figure out the best way to go with this. I'm sure as a PC builder yourself you'd understand?

Edit:
This was supposed to be before Aristotelian's post.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:52:55 PM

Ok, so an AMD build would be more suited for low budget gaming or something similar?
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 10:59:35 PM

^ clarifying...
i am no fanboy. dont get me wrong... 90% (yeah) build i suggest to builder in this forum is intel build :) 

let me help you summarize :
AMD A10
-similar core performance (slightly under i3)
-far more GPU power
-more power requirement

I3
-similiar performace
-lower gpu power
-lower pwer overall
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 11:05:56 PM

AMD Radeon said:
^ clarifying...
i am no fanboy. dont get me wrong... 90% (yeah) build i suggest to builder in this forum is intel build :) 

let me help you summarize :
AMD A10
-similar core performance (slightly under i3)
-far more GPU power
-more power requirement

I3
-similiar performace
-lower gpu power
-lower pwer overall


No worries, sounds good, thanks man.
ill lock that one in then, cheers for all the help guys! Might be a bit late but Happy New Year!
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 11:19:01 PM

The APU are essentially a CPU and relatively powerful GPU on the die. The CPU performance is a bit below a Core i3-3220, with it coming out on top when multi-threaded applications are involved.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/675?vs=677

The GPU performance for the A10-5800k is equal to a a Radeon HD6670, it has that GPU in it. Compared to dedicated graphics cards, it's pretty weak. But compared to the integrated graphics on Intel CPU's, it outperforms them by a long stretch.
You can also throw a dedicated 6670 graphics card into the rig and hybrid-crossfire, so the integrated and dedicated graphics work in unison and get better performance.

The market area that AMD was aiming to hit with the APU line is your sort of basic family machine, that is mainly used for browsing and such but would also be subjected to some light gaming. In that kind of scenario, the AMD APU's are a much better option than equivalent Intel chips or even AMD's own FX line.

However, the main advantage of an APU is its graphical, ie gaming, performance. So it may not be best for what your after in an office machine.
m
0
l
January 22, 2013 11:55:11 PM

Performance is comparable between A10 and i3, but i3 destroys A10 in efficiency. Maybe you don't care about how much energy your friend's office uses, but that seems wasteful. Toms review likes A10 but only from a "power user" perspective focused on gaming and performance, but that is not the purpose of this build. I say stick with i3.
m
0
l
January 23, 2013 12:37:44 AM

Alright, well this is what I've got so far:

Microsoft M7J-00019 Wireless Desktop 2000 - $35.00

LG E2342V 23in LED Widescreen Monitor - $149.00

CoolerMaster Elite 430 Black with window - $49.00

Seasonic S12II 430W Power Supply - $75.00

Samsung SH-224BB/BEBS SATA DVDRW Drive OEM - $19.00

Samsung 840 Series 120GB SSD Retail Box - $109.00

Corsair CMV4GX3M2A1333C9 4GB (2x2GB) DDR3 - $29.00

Intel Core i3 3225 - $135.00

ASRock B75M-DGS Motherboard - $59.00

Sub-total: $659.00

This is including a 23" monitor and an office mouse and kb combo.



m
0
l
January 23, 2013 12:41:43 AM

Looks fine to me.
m
0
l
January 23, 2013 1:53:53 AM

This is nitpicking, but the only negative I see is the case. It is a full size case even though you have a Micro-Atx build. I would want to take advantage of the smaller motherboard and get something as small as possible. Also the case looks kind of flashy for an office environment. Your buddy is going to have to work with this machine every day so you don't want to give him an eyesore. Consider one of these in Micro-Atx Mini-Tower size:

SilverStone SST-PS07B Black Steel / Plastic with Aluminum Accent MicroATX Mini Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Fractal Design Core 1000 Micro ATX Computer Case w/ 1 x 120mm fan
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
January 23, 2013 2:17:07 AM

Aristotelian said:
This is nitpicking, but the only negative I see is the case. It is a full size case even though you have a Micro-Atx build. I would want to take advantage of the smaller motherboard and get something as small as possible. Also the case looks kind of flashy for an office environment. Your buddy is going to have to work with this machine every day so you don't want to give him an eyesore. Consider one of these in Micro-Atx Mini-Tower size:

SilverStone SST-PS07B Black Steel / Plastic with Aluminum Accent MicroATX Mini Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Fractal Design Core 1000 Micro ATX Computer Case w/ 1 x 120mm fan
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I think the case I chose is also kind of ugly, but it's cheap and has what we need, I will just remove the LED's and get him to put it under his desk, thanks for the input though, i was actually looking at the silvertone and fractal cases but in australia the prices are a bit higher so it wouldnt make it plausible.
m
0
l
!