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Spontaneous restart under heavy load.

Last response: in Systems
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January 22, 2013 8:09:46 PM

A few days ago I upgraded my PC hardware, got a new Mobo, CPU, RAM, Heatsink and Case. I also upgraded to Windows 8. Since I got everything set up it's been suddenly rebooting when under load, like when I'm playing a game. I know it's not an overheating issue as it's a well-ventilated case and Speedfan read that none of the components read higher than normal temps before or after the reboots (30-35*C aside from GPU, which goes up to 60-70).
I thought then that it might be a bad stick of RAM, so I ran Memtest for 2-3 passes per stick, and on the slots, but found no errors. Failing that, I thought it might be an insufficient PSU, so I bought a higher voltage one, but this also had no effect on the problem. I'm running out of ideas here and could really use some help...

Specs:
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 (upgraded from generic-brand mobo (worked fine for years w/o issue))
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K (upgraded from i3)
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 2x4g DDR3-1600 (upgraded from Adata 4g stick)
GPU: EVGA GTX560 Ti
PSU: Coolermaster Extreme Power Plus 700W (upgraded from Inland 500W)
HDD: Western Digital 1TB
Heatsink: Coolermaster Hyper 212
Case: Coolermaster Storm Enforcer
OS: Windows 8 Pro 64-bit
a b B Homebuilt system
January 24, 2013 1:32:47 AM

Re-boots like that are going to be hard to track down. It could be any number of things. It may be a defective motherboard. It could even be ESD causing re-boots. Do you get a lot of static electric shocks? Are you plugged into a properly grounded electrical outlet?
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January 24, 2013 2:36:24 AM

clutchc said:
Re-boots like that are going to be hard to track down. It could be any number of things. It may be a defective motherboard. It could even be ESD causing re-boots. Do you get a lot of static electric shocks? Are you plugged into a properly grounded electrical outlet?


I've been using the same electrical outlet that I did for my previous pc and had no problems before. Any time I opened the case I used an electrostatic wristband so I have a hard time believing any components could have been zapped.

From what I've been trying I'm becoming more and more concerned that it's a defective motherboard. Argh.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 24, 2013 2:50:06 AM

The only reason I mentioned electro static discharge, is because where I live the winter is quite cold. My furnace runs alot and dries the air out. Static electricity has zapped my machines more than once and caused them to shut down. For instance, if I go to plug in a USB flash drive without first touching the metal case, it will more than likely arc at the USP port and shut down the system.

If you don't think ESD is causing your problem, then maybe the board is defective like you surmise. Is it still under warranty for an RMA?

Can you eliminate the gfx card being faulty by running a different card for awhile (or even use integrated) to see if you can simulate the problem?

I presume you meant you got a higher wattage PSU, not higher voltage... ;) 
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 24, 2013 2:52:26 AM

i see the psu is the most suspicious one

despite the culprit is probably something else....

that coolermaster psu is crxp and the major reason why builders have similar problem like you. i have seen enough similar thread
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January 24, 2013 3:38:53 AM

Yes I meant higher wattage :p 

Fortunately the motherboard is under warranty, I was just hoping to avoid the hassle of shipping it back and then waiting for a new one.

I did eliminate the GFX card as the culprit as it worked fine on my previous pc, and the problem persisted with the onboard graphics.

I would suspect the PSU going bad if it wasn't brand new... then again my luck would be bad enough to get a failing replacement for the failing power supply.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 24, 2013 2:25:18 PM

If you decide to RMA the board, you could always send it back for REFUND. Then order the new one at the same time. That's what I do to avoid delays when I get a bad board. That eliminates the turn-around time wasted for them to get the old board and verify it.
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