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d50

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August 16, 2005 4:53:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I've been reading some reviews (and newsgroup rants, raves, etc) about
the d50 and I would really like to hear what makes it so "entry level"
and might make it not suitable for a "serious amateur"? By the way I
currently use a Canon G2.

For example, why does it matter that there isn't any white balance
tuning if I shoot RAW? Is the DOF preview really as important as it
used to be when you couldn't review the picture immediately after
taking it?

It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?
If this was the only dslr would "serious amateurs" have to quit
altogether because the camera isn't capable (that's what some people
make it sound like)?

(No comments about the kit lens(es) please, I'm talking about the body
only here)

Anyway, I'm asking because I'm likely going to buy one of the "entry
level" dslrs (XT or D50, maybe D70) and I would like to hear some of
these questions answered.

Thanks, Brian

More about : d50

August 16, 2005 5:28:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Mr. Mark, thanks for the comments. The question about white balance
and RAW was more of a question for questions sake - I personally have
never used white balance tuning (I don't even know if the G2 has it),
and one of my friends has only used it occassionally. If the situation
were really tricky enough I would certainly shoot RAW so the
flexibility was there to change it afterward. I also agree on the
feel/size of the XT - a little too small for me I think. I like the
size of the D70 but I haven't actually picked up the D50 yet.

Jeremy, I can't see anything missing that I really care about enough to
get the D70. Plus I expect that I will probably upgrade within a few
years so that makes those things even less of an issue at this point!

Brian
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 5:34:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Brian,
The lack of features (or inclusion of them) is merely the way a
manufacturer can ask more money for a camera. You need to decide which
features are essential to YOU. And you need to decide how many
Megapixels are good enough FOR YOU. Lastly, as someone else suggested,
go to the store and HANDLE IT before buying!!! Your choice of cameras
with similar specs and similar features (those that matter to you) will
be the subjective impression of how it handles in YOUR hands.
I have been shooting professionally for a very long time, and
frankly the G2 was a wonderul travelling camera for me! I have 35mm
film system, medium format film system, and a large format monorail
studio camera system. What prompted recent the jump to DSLR was
frustration at the slow shooting speed at family events (like recent
graduation for Masters degree) while wanting digital images to share
easily with everyone. A son-in-law's D70 was wonderful to handle and
shoot with, but it didn't have the all features I wanted/needed. I
just bought my first DSLR because I finally found the necessary
combination of features and performance at an affordable price for ME,
not just because I thought I should jump on the DSLR bandwagon.

--Wilt
Related resources
August 16, 2005 5:38:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Wilt, just out of curiosity, what features did you want that the D70
didn't have?
August 16, 2005 5:39:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Jeremy, what makes a person an 'entry level slr user'?
August 16, 2005 5:41:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I should add that I love these newsgroups - I can't imagine an easier
way to have a discussion like this!
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 7:10:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

PC connection for flash (to use studio flash without using hot shoe
adapter)
True pentaprism (not pentamirror)
Ultimate resolution (as seen in direct comparison), lower noise at ISO
400
8 Mpixel
5 fps burst speed (for sports)
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 7:17:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Oh...one last thing...20D uses the same batteries as my G2!
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 10:07:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Brian" <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1124221991.459609.123170@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I've been reading some reviews (and newsgroup rants, raves, etc) about
> the d50 and I would really like to hear what makes it so "entry level"
> and might make it not suitable for a "serious amateur"? By the way I
> currently use a Canon G2.
>
> For example, why does it matter that there isn't any white balance
> tuning if I shoot RAW? Is the DOF preview really as important as it
> used to be when you couldn't review the picture immediately after
> taking it?
>
> It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
> ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?
> If this was the only dslr would "serious amateurs" have to quit
> altogether because the camera isn't capable (that's what some people
> make it sound like)?
>
> (No comments about the kit lens(es) please, I'm talking about the body
> only here)
>
> Anyway, I'm asking because I'm likely going to buy one of the "entry
> level" dslrs (XT or D50, maybe D70) and I would like to hear some of
> these questions answered.
>
> Thanks, Brian

For one, I really like having both the front and rear control dials on the
camera, and while I know you don't want to discuss the kit lens, the D70 kit
lens is one of the best around. Both cameras should give you great images,
if you are capable of taking great images, and you just have to look down
the list of options. If you don't need what the D70 or D70s offer, get the
50. The same lens on either camera should offer images so close you
wouldn't be able to tell the difference. And, not that many people shoot in
RAW mode anyway.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:13:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Brian" <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote in message

Hi Brian,

> Is the DOF preview really as important as it
> used to be when you couldn't review the picture immediately after
> taking it?

First, why take the photo if it's not right? Second, the review LCD's are
really too small to tell with any detail whether or not the shot
accomplished what you hoped. But frankly the DoF is something you will just
know after a while IMO.

> For example, why does it matter that there isn't any white balance
> tuning if I shoot RAW?

Because you tune the white balance after the fact on your computer in your
RAW converter.

> It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
> ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?
> If this was the only dslr would "serious amateurs" have to quit
> altogether because the camera isn't capable (that's what some people
> make it sound like)?

Sometimes I wonder what these people would do if all they had was a Canon
AE-1 or similar "automatic" camera from the days when automatic meant there
was a built in exposure meter. :) 

> Anyway, I'm asking because I'm likely going to buy one of the "entry
> level" dslrs (XT or D50, maybe D70) and I would like to hear some of
> these questions answered.

I just bought my girlfriend a Rebel XT and a close friend has the D70. They
both seem like great starter cameras in my opinion. The Nikon seems to come
with a better kit lens (I'm not referring to clarity, but it is a little
wider and a little faster IIRC). Personally I think you can't go wrong with
any of these models you've listed. The best thing is to go to a local shop
and get your hands on one. This is very important. I was personally
condidering a Canon Rebel XT, but after holding it in the store I decided it
was too cramped for my big fat fingers.

In my opinion every camera will have strengths and weaknesses. The
photographers job is to play up the strengths of his equipment while playing
down the weaknesses. So what's left is to find the camera that best matches
your personal style - in this way camera and photographer can work together
to create art. That's my Zen thought for the day. <g>

HTH!

--
Mark

Photos, Ideas & Opinions
http://www.marklauter.com
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:18:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Brian <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote:

> It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
> ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?

The pictures will be just fine.

The D50 lacks some features as compared to the D70; image quality isn't
one of them. If you can't see anything missing that you care about,
then odds are you won't care.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:18:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I think I'd have to get the 70s over the 50D for just the illuminated
lcd screen. But then I'm getting old. :-)
Paul


Jeremy Nixon wrote:
> Brian <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
>>ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?
>
>
> The pictures will be just fine.
>
> The D50 lacks some features as compared to the D70; image quality isn't
> one of them. If you can't see anything missing that you care about,
> then odds are you won't care.
>
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:32:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

> I like the
> size of the D70 but I haven't actually picked up the D50 yet.

Ditto. One thing to consider, unless you already have Nikon glass
investments, the Canon 20D isn't much more than the D70. :) 

> Jeremy, I can't see anything missing that I really care about enough to
> get the D70. Plus I expect that I will probably upgrade within a few
> years so that makes those things even less of an issue at this point!

I agree. If it has an aperture, a shutter and an eye-piece then you can
take pictures with it. :) 

--
Mark

Photos, Ideas & Opinions
http://www.marklauter.com
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:35:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Brian <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Jeremy, I can't see anything missing that I really care about enough to
> get the D70. Plus I expect that I will probably upgrade within a few
> years so that makes those things even less of an issue at this point!

Right; the thing is, the D50 is an entry-level camera, so if you're an
entry-level SLR user, the fit may be perfect!

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:49:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Brian <ripcurl187@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Jeremy, what makes a person an 'entry level slr user'?

If you've never used an SLR before, that's probably you.

Once you get more and more experience, you will start to feel the desire
(I hesitate to say "need") for more features and such. When you're just
starting out, you'll have enough to deal with just getting used to the
new way of working (as compared to using a P&S) that it's better not to
worry about that stuff anyway. Something like DOF preview -- don't worry
about it at first, until you get a handle on DOF to begin with, or else
it'll just distract you.

Pretty much any SLR will have the basic necessities, like manual controls
and lack of significant shutter lag.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
August 19, 2005 12:32:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Brian wrote:

> For example, why does it matter that there isn't any white balance
> tuning if I shoot RAW? Is the DOF preview really as important as it
> used to be when you couldn't review the picture immediately after
> taking it?

With RAW you normally do your light source color in the PC.

>
> It seems like many of the complaints aren't really related to the
> ability of the camera produce good pictures...could someone explain?
> If this was the only dslr would "serious amateurs" have to quit
> altogether because the camera isn't capable (that's what some people
> make it sound like)?
>
> (No comments about the kit lens(es) please, I'm talking about the body
> only here)
>
> Anyway, I'm asking because I'm likely going to buy one of the "entry
> level" dslrs (XT or D50, maybe D70) and I would like to hear some of
> these questions answered.

Skip right to the Maxxum 5D and don't worry. Has DOF preview, spot
metering and anti-shake... (to name a few).

FWIW a friend has the D50 and it is serving him quite well. OTOH, he
cares no a whit for DOF preview and RAW files.

Cheers,
Alan.

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