Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

first dslr

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
August 17, 2005 7:25:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I'm about to choose between Canon and Konica-Minolta.

I like the idea that the K-M has in-body stabilization.

I take pics of dance recitals with no flash so have the need for a new
system.

Anyone? Preferences?

More about : dslr

August 17, 2005 9:00:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

If you have either Canon or Minolta autofocus lenses then it may be more
economical to stay with that brand.
The Canon D20 reportedly has less noise at high ISOs which may be an
advantage for flashless shooting. You can buy image stabilized lenses for
the Canon. The extra 2mps in the Canon sensor are an advantage as well but
not as much as it may seem.
However the Minolta dSLR is a very fine camera and will serve you well
should you choose to go that route.
If you want the best images and you are going to be using the camera at its
extremes (high ISOs, uncontrolled natural light sources, mixed color light
sources, etc) the camera/lens is only part of the equation. In order to get
the best images you need to understand shooting in the raw format and
processing raw images in Photoshop (or the converter of your choice).
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 9:00:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"birdman" <apquilts@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:9wzMe.127$GV7.5@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
> If you want the best images and you are going to be using the camera at
> its extremes (high ISOs, uncontrolled natural light sources, mixed color
> light sources, etc) the camera/lens is only part of the equation. In order
> to get the best images you need to understand shooting in the raw format
> and processing raw images in Photoshop (or the converter of your choice).

This bears repeating, so I quoted it. Plus look into the cost/quality
of very fast lenses (i.e. flat f/2.8 zoom or primes) for the camera body
you're interested in, and budget for it. Maybe being an audience member
you'll have the ability to move around and set you viewpoint - this will
make a prime a very good option.

Dave
Related resources
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 9:49:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

birdman wrote:

> The Canon D20 reportedly has less noise at high ISOs which may be an
> advantage for flashless shooting. You can buy image stabilized lenses for
> the Canon.

Yes. But you can't by _fast_ image stabilised lenses as yet. Canon has
no image stabilised lens at f2.8 below 70 mm. (And the only one it has
at all, the 70-200 L IS USM, costs significantly more than a 20D body.)


However, there are a number of f2.8 zooms without image stabilisation
around, for any brand, some of them even relatively affordable. So, if
you use a zoom, you can gain at least two thirds of a stop. If you are
comfortable with primes, you can gain up to a full stop still again.

Even if Canon's noise is better than K/M:s, and the lens-based image
stabilisation more efficient than K/M:s in-camer anti-shake system, can
it really offset the advantage of being able to shoot with image
stabilisation at f1.4 as compared to f3.5?

The way I have figured, the K/M DSLR concept is strongest _just_ for
people whose main priority is to be able to shoot indoors in available
light as much and as well as possible.

In particular as the K/M anti-shake system clearly works well at the
modest focal lenghts used for indoor photopgraphy, whereas it is less
clear whether it performs as well with, say, a 400mm sitting on a 1.4x
teleconverter. (Or does for instance Alan have any more news on K/M:s
anti-shake performance with long teles?)

This is actually one of the two reasons that I have for not
pre-ordering a 5D right away. The other is that I feel that there might
be a chance that the upper-level point-and-shoots will soon become so
good that a DSLR offers no real bonus for someone like me, whose has no
AF lenses for his film SLR, and thus would have to start shopping
around for lenses even if I bought a Pentax, that could take my
existing lenses. The specs for, for instance, the Panasonic FZ30 seem
so good, and its predecessors work so well, that it really would need
only two stops more of useful ISO sensitivity for me to consider such a
camera an equal-value replacement for a DSLR. In particular as it
offers three distinct useful advantages to most DSLR:s, two of which
are entirely universal - the ability reliably to compose a picture
without having your eye next to the viewfinder, and the very discreet
shutter noise. (The third, the non-issue of sensor dust, seems to be
taken care of well also by choosing an Olympus, which on the other hand
doesn't seem to have any other advantages besides a couple of heavily
subsidised good lenses.)

Jan Böhme
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 9:53:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Thomas Müller wrote:

> On the other hand, most danceshots wont be possible with 1/125
> or slower, because people move to fast.

Depends on timing, and what kind of pictures you want. Motion blur
restricted to arms or legs can be qiute nice in dance photography. But
you are right that one has clearly limited options shooting at less
than 1/125.

Jan Böhme
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 12:18:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

gt wrote:

> I'm about to choose between Canon and Konica-Minolta.
>
> I like the idea that the K-M has in-body stabilization.
>
> I take pics of dance recitals with no flash so have the need for a new
> system.
>
> Anyone? Preferences?

Definitly the KM. You can use 50mm/1.4 with Antishake, which will allow very
dark shots. On the other hand, most danceshots wont be possible with 1/125
or slower, because people move to fast.

Thomas
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 7:45:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

> Anyone? Preferences?

Everyone will have preferences, probably for reasons that may not apply in
your situation

Do you already have any SLR lenses? That may guide your decision. The KM
digital SLRs will accept lenses from the film KM and M AF SLRs. I guess
Canon does???

Toa
August 17, 2005 7:45:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I have 3 lenses from my Minolta XG-M film camera.

I had hoped these would fit a digital camera, but have been told previously
that they will not. The Minolta cam is quite old.

Are you positive that they'll work ? The XG-M doesn't have focus in the
body. The lenses do the focusing.

How nice it would be if they'd work!
"Toa" <toa1614@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1124250353.4f9a434ebc09a9116c9847067012ae84@teranews...
> > Anyone? Preferences?
>
> Everyone will have preferences, probably for reasons that may not apply in
> your situation
>
> Do you already have any SLR lenses? That may guide your decision. The KM
> digital SLRs will accept lenses from the film KM and M AF SLRs. I guess
> Canon does???
>
> Toa
>
>
Anonymous
August 18, 2005 12:08:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

> Are you positive that they'll work ? The XG-M doesn't have focus in the
> body. The lenses do the focusing.

Nope, they won't

>> Do you already have any SLR lenses? That may guide your decision. The
>> KM
>> digital SLRs will accept lenses from the film KM and M AF SLRs. I guess
>> Canon does???
>> Toa

Key there is the AF lenses will snap on ok. That's lenses from Dynax or
Maxxum Auto Focus film cameras will be ok but not the prior lens systems.

Toa
!