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Finally Picked My Parts, Would love a Second Opinion!

Last response: in Systems
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January 25, 2013 2:57:36 AM

Hey All, So I decided to step back a minute and instead of rushing to buy a bunch of parts (rushing would not be a good idea), just do a bunch of research and ask around to figure out which parts would work for me.

The rig is going to be used for CAD programs, 3D modelling, Rendering, quite a bit of gaming and just everyday use. It basically gonna be the computer that I use for everything.

My main concern at this point is to make sure all the pieces will work together and that I wont have a problem assembling anything (IE: Case is actually too small):

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/zrPm

Please help me take a look! I wish to have a desktop ASAP! haha. Much thanks to this community though, you've helped me a lot!
January 25, 2013 3:04:21 AM

Get a PSU from Antec, Seasonic, XFX, Corsair. Not a huge thing as yours isn't awful. These brands are just more reliable and have a better track record.
January 25, 2013 3:23:21 AM

There are a lot of things that I think you're going overboard on, even for what you're doing.

1) If your intention is to RAID those drives, don't. SSDs get faster as they get larger, so it makes millions of times more sense to get a 512GB drive rather than taking the double risk of failure inherent in RAID. If your intention is to use one as a scratch disk, then by all means, go ahead. (But DON'T get the 840! It uses cheap NAND and isn't particularly reliable. Go with a Samsung 840 pro or 830, or an OCZ Vector or Vertex 4.)

2) Get 670s instead of 680s. This is a no brainer as soon as you look at the numbers; the 680 is only 5% *(2-3% after overclocking) faster, but it's 25-30% more expensive.

You better have a NICE monitor, too. I'd recommend either a good 120Hz monitor or one of the pixel perfect 27" monitors from Korea.
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January 25, 2013 5:17:37 PM

DarkSable said:
There are a lot of things that I think you're going overboard on, even for what you're doing.

1) If your intention is to RAID those drives, don't. SSDs get faster as they get larger, so it makes millions of times more sense to get a 512GB drive rather than taking the double risk of failure inherent in RAID. If your intention is to use one as a scratch disk, then by all means, go ahead. (But DON'T get the 840! It uses cheap NAND and isn't particularly reliable. Go with a Samsung 840 pro or 830, or an OCZ Vector or Vertex 4.)


Yeah I'd agree with this - putting your SSDs in RAID mode will likely lead to them failing on you. Especially if they're not completely identical or have varying capacities. That will lead to your system slowing down considerably. Get a solid 256GB drive like the OCZ Vector (currently the fastest single drive on the market) and a 1 - 2TB mechanical hard drive to store your extra files on.

Quote:
You better have a NICE monitor, too. I'd recommend either a good 120Hz monitor or one of the pixel perfect 27" monitors from Korea.


In order to use those monitors you need to have a video card with a D-Link DVI cable. Most of the current generation video cards have them but you should definitely check before buying.

If you want to do an X79 rig here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($569.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($228.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($184.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($368.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($368.98 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE 90 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($165.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $2602.35
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-25 14:17 EST-0500)
January 25, 2013 11:32:26 PM

I have a Dual Monitor set up in place with two of these: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Theyre not 120 Hz unfortunetly (60 Hz i think), but I think they're pretty good. I don't think its that big of a deal. Correct me if I am wrong though.

To be honest, I have never used RAID on my HDDs, so I was not planning on doing that at all (I am not familiar with it too). I was planning on having two separate drives, one for work and one for everything else. But since I figured out my old HDD works, I'll just grab that Samsung 840 pro 512 SSD for work (also programs, OS, ect.) and use my old Seagate barracuda for everything else. But I will keep them as two drives.

I know I might be going a bit overkill, but this computer will probably last me for a long time, i am not planning on upgrading and also the 4gb of Vram is what is more important to me. seeing as many of the 670 4gb cards are already ~$450, ill just go up to the 680 for a bit more. http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

There was also I wanted to ask: The last time I built a rig was ~8 years ago, And I am pretty rusty. Someone told me about the tutorials @ Newegg and I was thinking I could just watch those and try my hand at building this or I could pay someone else to do it? A friend of mine offered to do it for me for about $140.

!