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Monitor-GPU relationship, Please enlight me

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 11, 2012 3:59:29 PM

Hi Everyone, as the title suggests I would like to learn about some facts concerning GPS's and monitors....

Straight to the point: I was wondering about "native resolutions" of monitors and the running resolution of the GPU. Most of monitors are "1080p" resolution but GPU's are capable of 2560 or even 5000+ resolutions. So I wanted to know, If I had a single 1080p ("full HD") monitor it would be a good idea running it at, for example, 2560 or more? or would I be lossing resolution?

On the other hand, those the answer of the last question vary acording to the Monitor size, I mean, its the same an 1080 24 inch monitor than a 27 inch one? or I will be able to run higher resolution at a bigger monitor?

Well thats pretty much it, I hope I have made myself clear enough ( English is not my native language, so if there is something not clear, please coment it and I'll try to explain it)

Thanks a lot
Lucas
a b U Graphics card
December 11, 2012 4:11:58 PM

1080p refers to the monitors' capability when you run a DVD/Blu-Ray movie at Full Screen.

When you are not running a movie in full screen, or just using the computer normally, or playing games, then you revert to screen resolution like 1920x1080 for example.

Some monitors have more than one input that you can connect a DVD player to for example and the 1080p applies to that as well.
December 11, 2012 4:21:23 PM

I think you misunderstood my point...... games can be played at 2560 or even higher resolution, so to do this and really apreciate those huge resolutions, shouldn't I have, lets say, a """2560p""" monitor or something like that?......... Is the native resolution of a 1080 monitor the ideal GPU output resolution or it can display beter resolution without loosing quality?

Thanks a lot
Lucas
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a b U Graphics card
December 11, 2012 4:22:21 PM

The video card cannot render larger than the resolution of the monitor (if it tries to, the monitor won't show the image), and usually there is no way to do this. Once you are at the maximum resolution of your monitor, anti-aliasing can further smooth your picture out.

A GPU being able to run at higher resolutions just means that it can handle doing the computations needed to display and output a basic image at a given resolution, and doesn't neccessarily mean they will be able to run a game smoothly at that resolution. Games are the reason more powerful graphics cards are needed, as the more eye candy a game has, and the higher the resolution you run it at, the more powerful the GPU needs to be. If you don't play games, modern integrated graphics solutions are good enough for most non-gamers.

The resolution of the monitor is the number of dots it can display, a 20inch 1920x1080 (aka 1080p) monitor has the same number of dots as a 70inch 1920x1080 display, and your computer treats them exactly the same.
a c 130 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
December 11, 2012 4:26:25 PM

You should always use your monitors native resolution when ever possible. You can not do as you are suggesting and display a higher resolution on the screen. The maximum resolution of the screen is just that. It physically cant display more pixels than it has.

Mactronix :) 
December 11, 2012 4:37:02 PM

djscribbles said:
The video card cannot render larger than the resolution of the monitor (if it tries to, the monitor won't show the image), and usually there is no way to do this. Once you are at the maximum resolution of your monitor, anti-aliasing can further smooth your picture out.

A GPU being able to run at higher resolutions just means that it can handle doing the computations needed to display and output a basic image at a given resolution, and doesn't neccessarily mean they will be able to run a game smoothly at that resolution. Games are the reason more powerful graphics cards are needed, as the more eye candy a game has, and the higher the resolution you run it at, the more powerful the GPU needs to be. If you don't play games, modern integrated graphics solutions are good enough for most non-gamers.....


and

Quote:
You should always use your monitors native resolution when ever possible. You can not do as you are suggesting and display a higher resolution on the screen. The maximum resolution of the screen is just that. It physically cant display more pixels than it has.

Mactronix :) 



mmm I think I get it, but why BF3, Dirt 3, MW3, Dishonoured, and many other games have the option to run at resolutions higher than 1080, or is this aimed to multi monitor set ups?

In addition, let me see if I get it, if I'm into single 1080 monitor gaming ( lets suppose I have an all-mighty GPU) I will get the best visual quality setting all graphic options ( AA, textures, shadows, details and all that stuff) at the highest posible AND the resolution at 1080 (1920x1080 or 1920x1200, which I undestand is the same, isn't it?) whereas if I step up in resolution I'll notice no diference and will be wasting more power

Thanks a lot
Lucas
a b U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
December 11, 2012 4:48:15 PM

The monitor will not physically be able to display that resolution, so not only will you see no difference, you won't see anything at all. They are not the same, the x1200 means it has 1200 pixels horizontally where x1080 means 1080 pixels horizontally (or vertically, whichever it is). Monitors of resolution higher than 1080 are quite expensive, and I am not sure if they offer 4k monitors yet, but even the TVs available at 4k are in the 10's of thousands.
a b U Graphics card
December 11, 2012 4:48:24 PM

Lucas

There are monitors above the 1080p resolution but they aren't that mainstream. The Dell ultrasharp 30inch monitor has a resolution of 2560x1600 and thats the maximum there is for consumer level monitors. To go upto crazy resolutions(5k and above) you will need a multi-monitor setup.

Three 1080p monitors in surround/eyefinity would give you a resolution of 5760x1080.

Also if you do step up your resolution you WILL notice a difference in the graphical quality as now more pixels will be able to display even the finest details.

At the end of the day it depends on you whether you want to go multi-monitor or stick with a 1920x1080 or a 2560x1600 monitor.

Also there are two widescreen standards. 16:9 and 16:10 so a 1920x1080 screen is a 16:9 screen and 1920x1200 is a 16:10 screen. The same also goes for 2560x1600 and 2560x1440.
a b U Graphics card
December 11, 2012 5:44:26 PM

1920x1200 is in no way the same as 1920x1080.

1920 is the number of columns of pixels on the monitor. (The width)
1080 is the number of rows of pixels on the monitor. (The height)

A 1920x1200 monitor is taller, and more square than a 1920x1080 monitor.

You can buy monitors with all kinds of resoultions, 1920 x 1080 (aka 1080p) is not the best you can get; however if your monitor is 1920 x 1080, then it is the best resolution for your monitor.

Multi-monitor (panoramic) gaming often runs at 5760 x 1080, or 1920 x 5400 or 1920 x 3240 for vertical panels.

It seems like you are simply being confused by games showing you resolutions your monitor cannot display, or perhaps you have a high res monitor and don't realize it. If you choose a resolution above your monitors capability, it simply doesn't work, that is why every time you change your resolution, games ask "Are these settings acceptable?" and make you click OK within 30 seconds; if you pick a resolution you can't see, you can't click the box, and your resolution snaps back to what it was before.

Edit: From the games you listed, I would be surprised if all those will show you resolutions you cannot display, it maybe that you have a monitor with a large native resolution above 1920x1080, and you are running at a reduced resolution. On your desktop, what is the largest resolution windows will let you use, and does it work?

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a c 130 U Graphics card
a b C Monitor
December 11, 2012 6:06:07 PM
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I think where you are getting confused is when a game offers the higher resolutions you are of the mistaken belief that because the option is there then you must be able to use it. This is wrong.
The option to run at higher resolutions just means that the game supports that resolution for people who have a monitor of that resolution.

Its a physical restriction.

Resolution Density Pixel Size Ratio Pixels

1920 x 1080 100.1 ppi 0.2537 mm 16:9 1.98 MP

1920 x 1200 98.4 ppi 0.258 mm 16:10 2.2 MP


As you can see from the above 1920 x 1080 has 1.98 MP So you cant physically run 1920 X 1200 which has 2.2 MP on a screen with only 1.98 MP.

This only gets worse as you go up resolutions 2560 x 1600 is 3.91 MP. I hope you can see that there is no way this could fit on a screen that only has 1.98 MP to use.


Mactronix :) 
December 11, 2012 11:18:48 PM

Best answer selected by lucasmonta1.
December 11, 2012 11:37:40 PM

mactronix said:
I think where you are getting confused is when a game offers the higher resolutions you are of the mistaken belief that because the option is there then you must be able to use it. This is wrong.
The option to run at higher resolutions just means that the game supports that resolution for people who have a monitor of that resolution.

Its a physical restriction.

Resolution Density Pixel Size Ratio Pixels

1920 x 1080 100.1 ppi 0.2537 mm 16:9 1.98 MP

1920 x 1200 98.4 ppi 0.258 mm 16:10 2.2 MP


As you can see from the above 1920 x 1080 has 1.98 MP So you cant physically run 1920 X 1200 which has 2.2 MP on a screen with only 1.98 MP.

This only gets worse as you go up resolutions 2560 x 1600 is 3.91 MP. I hope you can see that there is no way this could fit on a screen that only has 1.98 MP to use.


Mactronix :) 


Thank you a lot, that was exactly what I was asking for, so in order to be able to enjoy higer in-game resolutions I must have the same amount of native resolution on the monitor :D ......................... on the other hand, when it comes to monitor's size in order to have a better image quality the spec I'm looking for is Densitiy, isn't it? ( in 2 monitors at the same density but different size, the smaller one will have a "clearer" image than the bigger one, or I'm wrong?)

On the other hand, a friend of mine told me ( when this same discussion came to board) that on a "Full HD-1080-" 32 inch ledTV he was able to game and use ( not in-game, descktop/normal use) a resolution of 2500, this was somewhat confusing to me, because, as all of you guys are telling me an 1080 screen ( ist a TV or pc monitor) should have as max resolution 1920x1080, or this changes acording to the other specs of the screen ( call it density, contras etc)?

Thanks a lot again, you guys rule! :D 
Lucas

PS: As you might image I trying to learn about monitors beacouse I'll probably be buying one sooner or later in 2013 and I wanted to know how to take the best out of the GPU ( lets leave aside wich GPU, as I said before, lets supouse its all-mighty). So acording to this discussion and some research to get the best I must look por something with <5ms response, >60Hz frecuenzy, highest contrast and density possible and highest native resolution possible, isn't it?

!