Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Under 1500$ gaming build

Last response: in Systems
Share
January 28, 2013 3:35:07 PM

motherboard:asus P8Z77-V LK
CPU:Intel core i5 3570k
GPU:Evga 660ti
Memory:Kingston hyperx 16gb(8x2)
SSD:Kingston Hyperx 120gb
Hardrive: seagate 1tb Hardrive
Case:Antec 1200v3
Power supply: Corsair enthusiast series TX750 watt

This is well under 1500 so far not including windows 7 Home premium.
I already have a monitor.

More about : 1500 gaming build

January 28, 2013 4:16:48 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.77 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($187.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Crucial 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($41.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Intel 520 Series Cherryville 180GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($376.48 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.93 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Sony AD-7280S-0B DVD/CD Writer ($25.97 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1465.05
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 13:16 EST-0500)
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 4:19:23 PM

You don't need a 750 watt unless you are going to SLI. Also, that doesn't look like a $1500 build... Most $1500 builds have something like SLI 670's/
m
0
l
Related resources
January 28, 2013 4:24:49 PM

you can get a better build as your power supply is overkill...you wont take the advantage of 16gigs of ram...8 is plenty for gaming...i would go with a single hard drive and spend more on graphics
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 4:26:36 PM

EasyTransfer has made you a really nice list...7950 is much better than the 660ti
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 4:52:20 PM

Quote:
You don't need a 750 watt unless you are going to SLI. Also, that doesn't look like a $1500 build... Most $1500 builds have something like SLI 670's/


I'll disagree - if you're paying $1500 for a system you definitely want to leave that option open. If you get a good video card then you probably won't have room for SLI / Crossfire - it's better to get a single stronger card than two weaker ones.

I would personally cut down on the case and invest more in the video card. I like the above build but I would not purchase an Intel drive - I had one and it crashed my system left and right.

Try this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($60.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($147.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($424.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($104.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1483.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 13:50 EST-0500)
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:04:34 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
You don't need a 750 watt unless you are going to SLI. Also, that doesn't look like a $1500 build... Most $1500 builds have something like SLI 670's/


I'll disagree - if you're paying $1500 for a system you definitely want to leave that option open. If you get a good video card then you probably won't have room for SLI / Crossfire - it's better to get a single stronger card than two weaker ones.

I would personally cut down on the case and invest more in the video card. I like the above build but I would not purchase an Intel drive - I had one and it crashed my system left and right.

Try this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($60.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($147.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($424.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R White ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($104.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1483.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

At this point you might as well get a liquid cpu cooler. Also I would shave off some of the extra expensive parts and get a 7970 ghz vapor-x. That is by far the strongest single card out and it will easy fit the budget...
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 13:50 EST-0500)

m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:13:43 PM

Quote:
At this point you might as well get a liquid cpu cooler. Also I would shave off some of the extra expensive parts and get a 7970 ghz vapor-x. That is by far the strongest single card out and it will easy fit the budget...


Not necessary. No need for a plastic water block when a strong air fan does the exact same job.

The card I linked to in that build is the Vapor X actually.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:16:52 PM

I'll throw in my tired old mantra - if this is just gaming, regardless of whose build you go with, ditch the HDD and use the money on a 256GB-sized SSD. That is a *lot* of games and there's not a good business case to have a bunch installed that you're not playing. Thank you, Steam!
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:26:32 PM

J_E_D_70 said:
I'll throw in my tired old mantra - if this is just gaming, regardless of whose build you go with, ditch the HDD and use the money on a 256GB-sized SSD. That is a *lot* of games and there's not a good business case to have a bunch installed that you're not playing. Thank you, Steam!


Games aren't the only thing that gets stored on the secondary - music, movies, DVD rips, large programs, large files, etc etc.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:30:52 PM

Indeed - why I always include "just for gaming" in the statement. For example, my gaming PC is for gaming. I have different one for media.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:42:26 PM

J_E_D_70 said:
Indeed - why I always include "just for gaming" in the statement. For example, my gaming PC is for gaming. I have different one for media.


I actually have three HDs on my build - my SSD for OS, my 1TB hard drive for media, and I have an older 320GB hard drive that I use to house my Steam folder.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 5:55:39 PM

I purchased the case awhile ago, because I simply couldn't resist as it was on sale. Thank you for the suggestions. I'm looking into to all of them.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 6:20:47 PM

At 1080p, it doesn't really get much better than sli 670's.... having 2 cards isn't a bad idea when there literally ISN'T a single card that comes close to the performance of two 670's.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 6:39:08 PM

If you're spending that much, you might as well go all out and buy a LGA 2011 rig.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($80.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 950W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1430.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 15:37 EST-0500)

It will provide a much better upgrade path and you're also going with an I7 instead of I5, so you're also getting better CPU performance.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 6:45:58 PM

Kamen_BG said:
If you're spending that much, you might as well go all out and buy a LGA 2011 rig.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($80.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 950W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.98 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1430.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 15:37 EST-0500)

It will provide a much better upgrade path and you're also going with an I7 instead of I5, so you're also getting better CPU performance.

What does the 3820 have that the 3770k doesn't? Seriously not worth it unless you need the 3930k.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 6:57:22 PM

its more about the 2011 socket than the CPU, but IMO stick with ivy. +1 to g-unit's build
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:05:22 PM

I think I'm on something here.. Gimme a sec
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:09:12 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Antec Kuhler H2O 620 Liquid CPU Cooler ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77MA-G45 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($92.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($226.99 @ Mac Mall)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($98.01 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1415.24
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 16:09 EST-0500)

Feedback would be nice
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:27:40 PM

for $1500 id get this
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.24 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($151.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.50 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1531.62
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 16:26 EST-0500)

If i was building for gaming ONLY. If i was building for a absolute hardcore gamer right now i wouldn't touch anything but the 3570k and a crossfire 7970 or sli 670 setup for anything above $1500.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:31:19 PM

Au_equus said:
its more about the 2011 socket than the CPU, but IMO stick with ivy. +1 to g-unit's build


But you don't need LGA 2011 or the 3770K on a gaming rig. Invest the money you would be spending on a better GPU setup. If it's future proofing you're going for remember there's no such thing.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:36:39 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
At this point you might as well get a liquid cpu cooler. Also I would shave off some of the extra expensive parts and get a 7970 ghz vapor-x. That is by far the strongest single card out and it will easy fit the budget...


Not necessary. No need for a plastic water block when a strong air fan does the exact same job.

The card I linked to in that build is the Vapor X actually.


Air fans are louder, take up more room, and can be bad for the cpu and motherboard (Especially if you move your case around).

The fact is a liquid cpu cooler costs the same, is quieter, and MORE powerful unless you are paying $80+ which again then there will be a stronger liquid cooler at those prices anyways.

Didn't see you listed a vapor-x...
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:48:09 PM

blake1243 said:
At 1080p, it doesn't really get much better than sli 670's.... having 2 cards isn't a bad idea when there literally ISN'T a single card that comes close to the performance of two 670's.


An overclocked 7970 GHz vapor-x is about 75% as strong as two overclocked 670's in SLI. You also have more video ram to use and you don't have to worry about SLI/CF driver problems.

Also having two cards doesn't make much sense when almost NO GAME will use that power now. It would be better to buy a second card later when they are cheaper and utilized.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:48:51 PM

CaptainTom said:
Air fans are louder, take up more room, and can be bad for the cpu and motherboard (Especially if you move your case around).

The fact is a liquid cpu cooler costs the same, is quieter, and MORE powerful unless you are paying $80+ which again then there will be a stronger liquid cooler at those prices anyways.

Didn't see you listed a vapor-x...


Yeah but if you're going to use liquid cooling, I can't stress this enough - either use the real thing or don't use it at all. Most of the H55/60/80s are not good, the H100 is OK but I'd rather have a D14.

Quote:
An overclocked 7970 GHz vapor-x is about 75% as strong as two overclocked 670's in SLI. You also have more video ram to use and you don't have to worry about SLI/CF driver problems.


I want to see this benchmark - I've never seen anything that says otherwise.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 7:50:01 PM

J_E_D_70 said:
I'll throw in my tired old mantra - if this is just gaming, regardless of whose build you go with, ditch the HDD and use the money on a 256GB-sized SSD. That is a *lot* of games and there's not a good business case to have a bunch installed that you're not playing. Thank you, Steam!


I also agree with this. I see no reason to get two storage drives when you can get one now that holds more, and then add more SSD's or HDD's when you need them. Plus there are some great 256 GB SSD's that cost under $180.
m
0
l
January 28, 2013 10:29:31 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah but if you're going to use liquid cooling, I can't stress this enough - either use the real thing or don't use it at all. Most of the H55/60/80s are not good, the H100 is OK but I'd rather have a D14.

Quote:
An overclocked 7970 GHz vapor-x is about 75% as strong as two overclocked 670's in SLI. You also have more video ram to use and you don't have to worry about SLI/CF driver problems.


I want to see this benchmark - I've never seen anything that says otherwise.



As you can see quite a few 7970's are around the number I quoted:

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/02-Un...

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/07-Cr...

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/19-To...


Wow I actually thought I may have been a little fanboyish with my claim, but these benchmarks support it so I guess I definitely think the 7970 GHz is the better choice now...

As for what cooler to get: From what I have used and read, liquid CPU coolers outperform any similarly price air cooler 9 times out of 10. Also there is no arguing that they they do take up much less room and put way less stress on the motherboard.
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 2:48:54 AM

Just wondering - If he were to go 3570k and Dual 7970s he would have to push that 3570k pretty far to remove bottleneck, and I don't know the Hyper 212 would be enough to carry that CPU load when it is pushed. If you are going 3570k, I'd say go with a better cooler as games like Crysis 3 WILL demand much from the CPU.

Blake, I would agree with your build but for one you definitely don't need an Extreme6. You can get that down to a Z77X-D3H, and the performance would be exactly the same. Gigabyte VRMs absolutely slaughter AsRock with IR3550, and beyond that I don't see any improvements.

Concerning closed-loop water coolers, unless you are using an outake fan on the top of your case you will not be cooling the Extreme6 VRM which WILL get hot when overclocking a 3570k.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: MSI Z77MA-G45 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($92.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1475.19
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 23:47 EST-0500)

Here is a built that is 62$ over budget, but gets you a 3770k. I would certainly argue that the 3770k is a necessity if you are looking for long-term performance. And, you won't have to push it as far because of the performance difference between it and the 3570k.
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 3:36:18 AM

CaptainTom said:
As you can see quite a few 7970's are around the number I quoted:

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/02-Un...

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/07-Cr...

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/19-To...


Wow I actually thought I may have been a little fanboyish with my claim, but these benchmarks support it so I guess I definitely think the 7970 GHz is the better choice now...

As for what cooler to get: From what I have used and read, liquid CPU coolers outperform any similarly price air cooler 9 times out of 10. Also there is no arguing that they they do take up much less room and put way less stress on the motherboard.



So according to this the current fastest GPU solution is the dual 7970. But what I'm surprised at is that dual 7970's beat out a 7990. :ouch: 
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 4:03:15 AM

g-unit1111 said:
So according to this the current fastest GPU solution is the dual 7970. But what I'm surprised at is that dual 7970's beat out a 7990. :ouch: 


The only thing you have to remember is that with 7970's the stock clocks are used to benchmark and their true performance is always far higher. My stock is 1000/1425 and I run it at 1210/1840. Massive performance difference (Around 25%). Some games almost get 50% more.
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 4:05:54 AM

They normall downclock to get two on a single PCB. Plus, the dual setups are GHz editions.

And on the watercool topic, most reviews I've seen show the only closed loop that beats the DH-14 in effectiveness or noise is the H100.
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 4:08:57 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0596 88.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Kingston Black 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($297.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($297.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($122.75 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1410.63
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-29 01:08 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1466.65
Promo Discounts: -$10.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$30.00
Shipping: $13.98
Total: $1440.63

should do the trick.

m
0
l
January 29, 2013 4:14:56 AM

bctande1 said:
Just wondering - If he were to go 3570k and Dual 7970s he would have to push that 3570k pretty far to remove bottleneck, and I don't know the Hyper 212 would be enough to carry that CPU load when it is pushed. If you are going 3570k, I'd say go with a better cooler as games like Crysis 3 WILL demand much from the CPU.

Blake, I would agree with your build but for one you definitely don't need an Extreme6. You can get that down to a Z77X-D3H, and the performance would be exactly the same. Gigabyte VRMs absolutely slaughter AsRock with IR3550, and beyond that I don't see any improvements.

Concerning closed-loop water coolers, unless you are using an outake fan on the top of your case you will not be cooling the Extreme6 VRM which WILL get hot when overclocking a 3570k.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: MSI Z77MA-G45 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($92.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1475.19
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-28 23:47 EST-0500)

Here is a built that is 62$ over budget, but gets you a 3770k. I would certainly argue that the 3770k is a necessity if you are looking for long-term performance. And, you won't have to push it as far because of the performance difference between it and the 3570k.


This is a good, balanced build. However if it were me, I would get a simple 80+ PSU fpr $40 less and invest in a full ATX mobo like this so your cards have plenty of space in your large case:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also I would get a 7970 GHz Vapor-x now and hold off on getting a second one for a while (until they are $100 cheaper). The Vapor-x is silent, cool running, and often overclocks to ~1300 MHz. It is a force to be reckoned with...
m
0
l
January 29, 2013 4:18:25 AM

3570k and 2 7950s are quite fine.
3770k is useless for gaming, hyperthreading doesnt do jack for gaming.

m
0
l
January 29, 2013 11:49:22 PM

CaptainTom said:
This is a good, balanced build. However if it were me, I would get a simple 80+ PSU fpr $40 less and invest in a full ATX mobo like this so your cards have plenty of space in your large case:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also I would get a 7970 GHz Vapor-x now and hold off on getting a second one for a while (until they are $100 cheaper). The Vapor-x is silent, cool running, and often overclocks to ~1300 MHz. It is a force to be reckoned with...


Thank you, Captain Tom, for your honest feedback.

Concerning the case -- my only reason for going MicroATX was because recently I came to the conclusion that most people do not require Full-ATX Mobos/Cases, and MicroATX builds offer virtually identical performance, usually only skimping a bit on things like VRM, PWM fan headers, and PCIE slots(which isn't a problem for my MSI board), at a much more compact design that is easy to transport/hide etc. I can see where you are coming from with ATX, however, as it does offer better room for upgrades.

As far as the PSU -- I really wanted to stay at 750W, as I understand how much power this system will undoubtedly require (681W on PCPartPicker), and 80+ Plus Gold is always a comforting quality assurance. If we were to go cheaper, we could pick up an NZXT Hale 750W 80+Bronze PSU for 90$, A Rosewill Hive 750W, and a Corsair 750 -- the latter two rated at 80+ Bronze as well. It would save around 20$, but then the question becomes whether or not that 20$ warrrants the drop from 80+ Gold to 80+ Bronze. 20$ move us up to an MSI-G45 ATX motherboard, so the drop in PSU efficiency would allow space for an ATX MOBO.

Here is a refined build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G45 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1443.63
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-29 20:42 EST-0500)

This post is becoming long, but to be honest, I would rather CFX two Radeon 7950s, as the performance would still be out of the window, but that would make space for a better CPU cooler/ Better PSU etc.

Think about that, A Gigabyte 7950 is only 300$, which would effectively save us 100$ in total if we switched to that for CFX. The OP could do a mild OC on those, effectively reaching within a few FPS of 7970 speeds which isn't hard at all, and we could pick up a more robust CPU cooler like one of NXZT's new Kraken 140mm X40 coolers which --- have ---- been ----- lighting up reviews left and right, and we would still have ~20$ to slide the PSU back up to 80+ Gold.

CFX'ing 7970s is wicked performance that won't be needed until a year or so down. I think the 7950s would be a much better idea. What do you guys think?
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 12:04:28 AM

not bad but i dont see any improvement over my suggestion, just more money.

yes i second 7950x2

:) 

m
0
l
January 30, 2013 12:36:35 AM

Tek Syndicate recently held a rather unpleasant, but very enlightening series of benchmarks comparing the 8350, 3570K and 3770k. It was unpleasant because the FX-8350 performed much better in comparison to the i-Processors than in other benchmarks. But the 8350 is not the topic of the day. You can see from their results that the 3770K offered a consistent ~9 or so frames while gaming on CPU intensive titles, such as Metro 2033, Trine 2, Crysis Warhead etc. These games are typically known to be notoriously hard to score high frames on even with Multi-GPUs -- which is what I think warrants the 3770K. Now, that is only one benchmark, but that is because I believe the value of the 3770k will become more visible in the future.

I think it has to do with the fact that games are progressively becomes heavily threaded and this will most likely be a built that the OP won't tweak for the next 1-2 years, and by then we definitely would be seeing the benefits of HT on a Quad-Core. I don't think HT in itself is the problem, because it has been shown to help i3 3220s, but that is because it pushes their virtual core-count to the much more conventional four, while the 3770k's is pushed to the much more unconventional eight -- Correct me if I'm wrong there.

Bbut overall I just think that Multi-GPU systems warrant better processors -- but for many people this logic only becomes obvious when you move to TRI-SLI/QUAD-FIRE systems, where Sandy-E reigns. The recently published Best CPUs for the money had cut out the Dual Core Pentiums previously hailed for being budget gaming kings for Quad-Core Athlons and Phenoms because the market had simply moved towards heavier threads, and writer had noted that.

I guess in the end you can my argument doesn't hold enough water in the present to justify the advantages it may have in the future, but that's my two cents.
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 1:00:23 AM

And for the record, iceclock, its Batman vs. The Joker..
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 1:13:17 AM

i dont get it?

m
0
l
January 30, 2013 1:25:18 AM

Lol, My avatar is Christian Bale(Batman), and yours is the Joker hahha
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 2:20:55 AM

bctande1 said:
Thank you, Captain Tom, for your honest feedback.

Concerning the case -- my only reason for going MicroATX was because recently I came to the conclusion that most people do not require Full-ATX Mobos/Cases, and MicroATX builds offer virtually identical performance, usually only skimping a bit on things like VRM, PWM fan headers, and PCIE slots(which isn't a problem for my MSI board), at a much more compact design that is easy to transport/hide etc. I can see where you are coming from with ATX, however, as it does offer better room for upgrades.

As far as the PSU -- I really wanted to stay at 750W, as I understand how much power this system will undoubtedly require (681W on PCPartPicker), and 80+ Plus Gold is always a comforting quality assurance. If we were to go cheaper, we could pick up an NZXT Hale 750W 80+Bronze PSU for 90$, A Rosewill Hive 750W, and a Corsair 750 -- the latter two rated at 80+ Bronze as well. It would save around 20$, but then the question becomes whether or not that 20$ warrrants the drop from 80+ Gold to 80+ Bronze. 20$ move us up to an MSI-G45 ATX motherboard, so the drop in PSU efficiency would allow space for an ATX MOBO.

Here is a refined build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G45 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: PowerColor Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Hive 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1443.63
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-29 20:42 EST-0500)

This post is becoming long, but to be honest, I would rather CFX two Radeon 7950s, as the performance would still be out of the window, but that would make space for a better CPU cooler/ Better PSU etc.

Think about that, A Gigabyte 7950 is only 300$, which would effectively save us 100$ in total if we switched to that for CFX. The OP could do a mild OC on those, effectively reaching within a few FPS of 7970 speeds which isn't hard at all, and we could pick up a more robust CPU cooler like one of NXZT's new Kraken 140mm X40 coolers which --- have ---- been ----- lighting up reviews left and right, and we would still have ~20$ to slide the PSU back up to 80+ Gold.

CFX'ing 7970s is wicked performance that won't be needed until a year or so down. I think the 7950s would be a much better idea. What do you guys think?


Oh I did not notice that your case was micro ATX too. That's why I suggested a bigger mobo. Actually my case is the smallest micro-atx I could find so I agree on goin g small!

Also I don't really disagree with your choices, they are just not the ones I would make. But I can also recommend the 7950 if it is a good one. My brothers 7950 (one overclocked a ton) is only 10-15% weaker than my 7970 fully overclocked. My advice is to go with two 7950's, or go big and get 1-2 7970 GHz because they really are noticeably stronger.
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 3:03:40 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X40 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G45 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($424.98 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 Elite (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.93 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1268.57
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-30 00:03 EST-0500)

Anyone disagree with this?
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 3:21:13 AM

yes, i prefer my build.

also thats not batman thats american psycho.

m
0
l
January 30, 2013 9:56:24 PM

bctande1 said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X40 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G45 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.78 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.95 @ Mac Connection)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($424.98 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 Elite (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.93 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1268.57
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-30 00:03 EST-0500)

Anyone disagree with this?

Nope this is perfect. However if it were me, I would just get one 250GB SSD instead of 2 storage solutions, and then get more as I need more. But that is completely a personal preference.

This build will max out every game out now, last 5+ years before any full upgrade is needed, and allow the option to crossfire another card in the future while also saving a lot cash that would be wasted on unneeded performance now.
m
0
l
January 30, 2013 11:20:45 PM

iceclock said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Aepn/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Thermaltake CLP0596 88.8 CFM CPU Cooler ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: Kingston Black 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Kingston HyperX 3K 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($297.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($297.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($122.75 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1410.63
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-01-29 01:08 EST-0500)

Base Total: $1466.65
Promo Discounts: -$10.00
Mail-in Rebates: -$30.00
Shipping: $13.98
Total: $1440.63

should do the trick.


I was typing up an extremely long reply when I accidentally clicked the delete key on my Chrome Tab, so this will be short but concise.

The reason I chose the 3770k over your 3570k is because the progressive movement towards heavily threaded games, as believed by many and mentioned in Toms Hardware Best PC for the money article. I have already talked about this, so I won't go too deep into it. Anyway, the price of upgrading a CPU in the future would be virtually the same as it is now, because Intel Processors barely drop in price over time. Take for example the 2600K and 2500K, which are 320$ and 220$, respectively. These have been out for two years but have dropped in price a mere 10$ since. You simply won't be saving a lot of if you chose to spend an extra 320$ changing your CPU a year or two from now.

However, choose a strong single-GPU system now would be great for price-over-time, because GPUs drop in price much more often than CPUs. A year or two from now, the OP might want to add a second 7970, and that would undoubtedly cost much less money that now, when he doesn't need the performance. Look at the 560ti, it launched at 300$ a few months AFTER Sandy Bridge, but costs 100$ less on most retailers because the price simply drops more often. We've seen a near 100$ shift-down in price for almost all AMD 7000-Series GPUs since release, and we still have a fairly long amount of time till 8000-Series GPUs. Buying another 7970 in the future would cost much less than upgrading to 3770K, compared to today's prices.

The same can be said for your RAM. The OP won't need 16GB of RAM for a pretty long time, and flash memory is getting cheaper by the minute. There is no reason to shoot for 16GB now -- RAM is constantly fluctuating in price, and we will undoubtedly be able to pick up another 8GB stick for 20$~ in the future, if he went with 8GB.

There very little I can say about your Thermaltake Frio, becuase it has barely been reviewed, but the two reviews I can find completely contradict each other -- Overclockers Tech, in a their review, saying it is amazing. But hardware secrets, says its awful

I don't know how to choose between the two, but I can tell you one thing -- I haven't seen a SINGLE negative review of the NZXT Kraken

I rarely choose AsRock boards anymore, because I personally believe the color choice is awful, the only return rates I've seen name it the worst, and it's VRM is relies more on quantity that quality -- beat out by basically every other MOBO manufacturer out there except for the obvious like FoxConn, etc. MSI and Gigabyte are the best among VRM design, with the latter being number one -- but MSI still has the award-winning Military Class III

Looking at the rest of your build, I like the 300R -- I built my mom's PC with it -- but I feel the Tempest is a hidden gem that few people take advantage of. The only real difference I can see between the two is that the 300R has built in standoffs, and the Tempest has grommeted cable routing holes.

You overshoot like hell with the power supply.. PC part picker rates that at 600W, so a 750 would be more than enough, and mine is gold whilst yours is silver. You won't be adding a third 7950 because a 3570K won't OC high enough to remove that bottleneck, so that's that IMO. You can get more efficiency at a lower price (my Rosewill Capstone)

As far as your SSD, I'm not to familiar with the generational differences, though I know some a clearly better than others. I've heard too much good out of either to make that call.

For these reasons, I like my build better.
m
0
l
January 31, 2013 1:43:45 AM

ur funny, u did forget the op chooses the final build right,dont pump ur ego too much, u might need butter and syrup. also i know my stuff, also hyper threading can have a negative effect on gaming, and shows no sign of been optimized and implanted in games, also the frio has gotten good reviews and cools well, good to know u prefer ur own build better why not give u a medal? shur whynot.

these are opinions and not facts. remember the difference, im all fine with u making recommandations but without proof or exact reason u cannot justify saying ur build is better.

m
0
l
January 31, 2013 1:46:55 AM

also asrock boards are rock solid, there one of the top 5 motherboard makers of today.

so dont say asrock is of mediocre quality when u have 0 facts pointing to that.

anybody here can vouch for that.

just shows u dont really know what ur talking about sorry.

also better to have twin 7950s than to chase after the dragon to find a second one later.

m
0
l
January 31, 2013 1:53:53 AM

Um... I'm sorry but I can't possibly even respond to such an un-scholarly/unorganized/un-cited "arguement"

Lol AsRock Top 5
1. Gigabyte
2. MSI
3. ASUS
4. EVGA
5. Intel (even though they are discontinuing their boards, Origin PC runs their $5,000 build of an Intel Mobo)
6..... AsRock
7... Who else is even slightly competitive? FoxConn/BioStar.........WHAT?

I guess MOBO return rates don't matter anymore.

TBH... you need to be more SERIOUS about things.
m
0
l
January 31, 2013 2:07:31 AM

bctande1 said:
Um... I'm sorry but I can't possibly even respond to such an un-scholarly/unorganized/un-cited "arguement"

Lol AsRock Top 5
1. Gigabyte
2. MSI
3. ASUS
4. EVGA
5. Intel (even though they are discontinuing their boards, Origin PC runs their $5,000 build of an Intel Mobo)
6..... AsRock
7... Who else is even slightly competitive? FoxConn/BioStar.........WHAT?

I guess MOBO return rates don't matter anymore.

TBH... you need to be more SERIOUS about things.


In my experience people should just get the motherboard brand they trust. However I will say I have built a ton of PC's for me and others, and they were all ASROCk. I have never had to send one back and their software is the best I have seen. I am not saying ASROCK is the best, I am just saying they have been for me, and that they shouldn't be put down.
m
0
l
January 31, 2013 2:20:27 AM

CaptainTom said:
In my experience people should just get the motherboard brand they trust. However I will say I have built a ton of PC's for me and others, and they were all ASROCk. I have never had to send one back and their software is the best I have seen. I am not saying ASROCK is the best, I am just saying they have been for me, and that they shouldn't be put down.


I have built an AsRock build as well, the 970 Extreme 3 I believe, and it has been performing smoothly. I understand what you're trying to say, but I base that off MOBO return rates, VRM quality, and BIOS features. AsRock has a prett decent bios, but their MosFets are rated fairly low(around 30A - 40A), and the return rate is the worst, albeit by > 1%~ . Maybe I was being to harsh, its just that when you have a build of this budget I really think best of best.
m
0
l
January 31, 2013 2:24:00 AM

seems my previous message got deleted how fun, anyways come see me when u get expert level and well talk bud, u seem to know some stuff but doesnt make u better, or have the right to put down my good suggestions, ur allowed to ur opinion but saying useless negative comments will bring u nothing good.

im sticking with my build and my opinions on asrock.

m
0
l
!