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The Laserdisc format in 2005 and beyond...

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Anonymous
March 1, 2005 8:56:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Hi All

I'm a newcomer to the usenet scene so bear with me if I'm talking
drivel or repeating a conversation you had last week. Its great to see
this group so active and that we have so many LD devotees still out
there. I've been into Laserdiscs for over a year now, you can say I was
a late embracer of the technology :o ) Having purchased a player and
discs on ebay, I've never looked back, and now I buy and sell them on
ebay as a hobby.

I think the format is great. Tactile objects, great cover art, great
picture quality on a well mastered disc, stunning audio, those ohhh so
lavish box sets, I could go on. Most of the people who know me think
I'm mad, but they soon change their tune when they experience a good
AC3/DTS & THX mastered disc in full tilt. I'm not saying that DVD isn't
superb in its own right, its just that there's something about LD's, I
can quite put my finger on it, maybe its cause I'm old enough to
remember vinyl :o )

So, I wonder what will happen to LD's over the next few years. Will
people be desperate to sell off collections and trade up to more modern
formats? With the production of new players now over, will existing
ones end up fetching stupidly high prices? I've almost given up on
getting a HLD-X9 for a half decent price already! And good old 'Laser
Rot' - A subject that has had many discussions i'm sure - Searching
back through the posts here shows that people were really concerned
about it a few years back - I wont say I haven't come across it, as I
have, but I wonder if the mid to late 90's pressings will have shown
any problems by now and wont deteriorate further on the shelf. I would
love to think I could enjoy my collection for years to come. Do people
think that discs themselves will become more valuable in the future?
With the number of LD only titles getting smaller and smaller, as
releases finally make their way to DVD, what do you think will happen
to their value? Even a common title like Aladdin fetched far more when
it was LD only.

I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their crystal balls :o )
Looking forward to hearing some views.

Oh, and before I forget, a big thanks to Julien Wilk and all of the
members at lddb for making it my definitive source of information on
all things Laser.

My regards, Mark

More about : laserdisc format 2005

Anonymous
March 1, 2005 11:21:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

> LunarJetman1970 <gelboy_goughie@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their
> crystal balls :o )

By 2015, all LDs will have succumbed to laser rot,
and will be shrinkwrapped to skids and stacked in
alleyways for recycling.

This was all revealed to us in "Back to the Future,
Part II".

--
Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 12:46:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I've been into LDs for less than a year, and I totally agree - there's
something about them. They are very cool. I originally bought an LD player
for a couple laserdisc ONLY concert videos, but I've since been buying LDs
left and right. I agree, a well-mastered disc looks about as good as DVD,
if not better because it's not compressed.

BTW, I think they fixed the laser rot problem in the 90's. It was the glue
they used to hold them together, I read.

-Mike
Related resources
March 2, 2005 6:24:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"half_eaten" wrote:

> I've been into LDs for less than a year, and I totally agree - there's
> something about them. They are very cool. I originally bought an LD player
> for a couple laserdisc ONLY concert videos, but I've since been buying LDs
> left and right. I agree, a well-mastered disc looks about as good as DVD,
> if not better because it's not compressed.
>
> BTW, I think they fixed the laser rot problem in the 90's. It was the glue
> they used to hold them together, I read.

LD titles that were known, consistant rotters were being sold right up to
the media's end around early 2000. "Starship Troopers" and "Contact" are two
good examples. I've gone through 4 copies of ST.

T.B.
March 2, 2005 6:35:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"Bob Niland" wrote:

>> LunarJetman1970 <gelboy_goughie@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their
>> crystal balls :o )
>
> By 2015, all LDs will have succumbed to laser rot,
> and will be shrinkwrapped to skids and stacked in
> alleyways for recycling.

That reminds me of Pioneer's "fire sales" at their Southern California
warehouse around 1997 - 1998. There would be a low key announcement for a
one day sale usually on a Saturday and you'd go to the warehouse near
Torrance and there'd be about 300 people lined up, some with shopping carts.
They'd open the doors and it was just insane. People would just jam in and
grab LDs as if they were pieces of gold. There'd be pallets with stacks of
titles like the various Star Trek series LDs, box sets like the "Amadeus"
and "Platoon"sets, just thousands of Pioneer produced or pressed titles
discounted up to 90% off retail.

I think Universal in conjunction with a major LD retailer had one or two
similar sales as well in some tent near their studio backlot. I remember
picking up the "Jaws" box for 10 bucks and the Criterion CAV "Akira" for $20
there. I know a major LD/Home Theater store in Yorba Linda, CA also had a
couple great LD fire sales as well.

I think I bought a third of my total LD collection in juts a couple month's
time during those sales thinking I was getting a great deals buying a movie
for 20 bucks instead of 40 or even 99 bucks for a nice special edition box.

DVD prices have sure put that in perspective.

T.B.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 8:08:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"LunarJetman1970" <gelboy_goughie@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1109728576.814466.136270@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> And good old 'Laser
> Rot' - A subject that has had many discussions i'm sure - Searching
> back through the posts here shows that people were really concerned
> about it a few years back - I wont say I haven't come across it, as I
> have, but I wonder if the mid to late 90's pressings will have shown
> any problems by now and wont deteriorate further on the shelf.

As a rule, if a disc is a "rotter" it will show signs within the first
two years of its manufacture. Since the last laserdisc was produced
almost 4 years ago, if a disc you own doesn't show rot by this point you
should be safe.

"half_eaten" <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ff027c37d2587eb969541460867d50cd@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
> BTW, I think they fixed the laser rot problem in the 90's. It was the
> glue
> they used to hold them together, I read.

The Sony DADC plant (aka "the rot factory") had problems right up until
the day they closed the doors. Stay away from Sony discs to lessen your
changes of running into laser rot.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 8:08:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

All I know is all of my Pioneer releases are fantastic. I have noticed
minor rolling lines on one of my pioneer discs, and that same one also has
those white specks(i.e. video noise) but the others are practically
perfect.

I have a disc playing in my player right now actually, it's made by Warner
Reprise and the quality is unbelievable. No picture noise, no laser rot...
on the black screens it's absolutely flawless pure black. looks
incredible!

-Mike
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 8:19:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

>
> That reminds me of Pioneer's "fire sales" at their Southern
California
> warehouse around 1997 - 1998. There would be a low key announcement
for a
> one day sale usually on a Saturday and you'd go to the warehouse near

> Torrance and there'd be about 300 people lined up, some with shopping
carts.
> They'd open the doors and it was just insane. People would just jam
in and
> grab LDs as if they were pieces of gold. There'd be pallets with
stacks of
> titles like the various Star Trek series LDs, box sets like the
"Amadeus"
> and "Platoon"sets, just thousands of Pioneer produced or pressed
titles
> discounted up to 90% off retail.
>
> I think Universal in conjunction with a major LD retailer had one or
two
> similar sales as well in some tent near their studio backlot. I
remember
> picking up the "Jaws" box for 10 bucks and the Criterion CAV "Akira"
for $20
> there. I know a major LD/Home Theater store in Yorba Linda, CA also
had a
> couple great LD fire sales as well.
>
> I think I bought a third of my total LD collection in juts a couple
month's
> time during those sales thinking I was getting a great deals buying a
movie
> for 20 bucks instead of 40 or even 99 bucks for a nice special
edition box.
>
> DVD prices have sure put that in perspective.
>

Thats amazing. We were lucky to see Laserdiscs in this country full
stop, let alone at knock down prices like that, I would have been one
of those raving madmen trying to grab all I could for sure lol.... I
played my copy of BLOWN AWAY the other night, and still stuck to the
paper sleeve was the store price ticket - I bought the disc on ebay for
next to nothing, but there it was, an original price of £75.00..
GULP... Around 150 dollars in todays conversion. Is it no wonder the
format struggled in the UK!!?
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 8:22:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

LOL, Nice one Bob. Well, I guess I can use all of my poly lined sleeves
for my Vinyl Collection hehe.. And the elephant condoms, well, I guess
I can just ship those off to the zoo! I'd forgotten about that scene in
Back to The Future, I must get hold of a copy now.. off to search ebay
:o ) Oh, and by the way. Great FAQ. Loads of useful info in there,
thanks.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 10:37:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

> So, I wonder what will happen to LD's over the next few years. Will
> people be desperate to sell off collections and trade up to more
modern
> formats? With the production of new players now over, will existing
> ones end up fetching stupidly high prices? I've almost given up on
> getting a HLD-X9 for a half decent price already! And good old 'Laser
> Rot' - A subject that has had many discussions i'm sure - Searching
> back through the posts here shows that people were really concerned
> about it a few years back - I wont say I haven't come across it, as I
> have, but I wonder if the mid to late 90's pressings will have shown
> any problems by now and wont deteriorate further on the shelf. I
would
> love to think I could enjoy my collection for years to come. Do
people
> think that discs themselves will become more valuable in the future?
> With the number of LD only titles getting smaller and smaller, as
> releases finally make their way to DVD, what do you think will happen
> to their value? Even a common title like Aladdin fetched far more
when
> it was LD only.
>
> I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their crystal balls :o )
> Looking forward to hearing some views.
>

It's interesting that through all of the questions I raised in my
original post, the one that most people picked up on was dreaded Laser
Rot. I take it that it is still something that people still have strong
opinions on - I'll be honest, I have over 1000 discs now and I'm only
seeing a rot percentage of around 1% - I own good copies of Eraser,
Beauty & The Beast WIP, Starship Troopers, Airforce One, Fargo etc, but
I wont deny that I've had rotted versions of them too.

On a seperate note, and only owners of Analogue PAL Laservision 1980's
discs will probably know, as I've never seen an NTSC one go the same
way -What causes some of the discs to go a bronzey colour and get
mottled 'watermarks' under the disc surface? A lot of these look
absolutely sh*te but still play!

Nice to see people are still interested in LD's. Any more views on the
future? Would love to hear what people think. See my original post.

Nice chatting with you all. M.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 10:54:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

> So, I wonder what will happen to LD's over the next few years. Will
> people be desperate to sell off collections and trade up to more
modern
> formats?

I picked up my first LD player in 1995. Like everyone else I eventually
went with DVD, but I still have a larger number of Laserdiscs. I picked
up quite a few over the last few years when all the stores were dumping
their stocks and people were dumping their collections at the local A/V
stores. Although obviously in most cases DVDs are superior, i'm still
quite happy with the quality of LD. I don't think i'll be ditching my
collection anytime soon. I think LD will continue on as a hobbiest
niche for the forseeable future. People still collect and watch CEDs
and Beta, both formats have been mostly defunct for years. [Yes, betas
were available mail order for a long time, but still].

But with about 700-800 discs (i lost count long ago) My laserdiscs will
sit next to my DVDs for quite sometime.

- numsix
- www.villagebbs.com
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 11:14:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 20:21:30 -0600, Bob Niland <email4rjn@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> LunarJetman1970 <gelboy_goughie@hotmail.com> wrote:

>> I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their
>> crystal balls :o )

>By 2015, all LDs will have succumbed to laser rot,
>and will be shrinkwrapped to skids and stacked in
>alleyways for recycling.
bullshit.

Maybe every LD you'e seen was defective, but most aren't.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 12:23:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

In the UK, as far as I remember, you were looking at anything between
20 - 60 pounds (approx $40 - $120) on average for a normal release, and
box sets went into hundreds. Of course, once DVD took a hold the few
shops in the UK that stocked them were pretty desperate to shift them
so prices came down in the sales. For me, I never seem to remember them
slowly dissapearing though, it was almost overnight, one day shops had
LD sections, the next, nothing..... Strange....
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 2:02:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

In article <%vaVd.35469$xX3.20893@twister.socal.rr.com>,
partyslammer@socal.rr.com says...

> That reminds me of Pioneer's "fire sales" at their Southern California
> warehouse around 1997 - 1998. There would be a low key announcement for a
> one day sale usually on a Saturday and you'd go to the warehouse near
> Torrance and there'd be about 300 people lined up, some with shopping carts.
> They'd open the doors and it was just insane. People would just jam in and
> grab LDs as if they were pieces of gold. There'd be pallets with stacks of
> titles like the various Star Trek series LDs, box sets like the "Amadeus"
> and "Platoon"sets, just thousands of Pioneer produced or pressed titles
> discounted up to 90% off retail.

I used to be jealous of those who lived in California when I'd read
about those sales here (although as I recall, Pioneer did have a couple
of mail-order sales as well, but the bulk of the real deals went to
those who were close enough to attend the in-person sales). But that was
before Laser Exchange started blowing out huge stocks of MGM laserdiscs,
first at 50% off, then later at $10-15 a pop.

After a slow start, Warner's now doing a pretty good job of getting
catalog titles out on DVD, but there are still a bunch of fairly obscure
films released by MGM on LD (when Turner still owned that part of the
Warner catalog) that probably aren't going to show up on DVD for quite a
while. Some of those MGM discs that I got for $10 are now pretty scarce
and go for considerably more than that when they show up on eBay.

Speaking of Laser Exchange, I hadn't looked at their website in quite a
while, but it appears that in their later incarnation as Playback
Trading, they're almost totally out of the LD business - they hardly
have any LDs listed for sale on their site now. Too bad, I'll always
remember them fondly.

Dave
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 3:11:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

What was the original standard price of LDs anyway? I never had a laserdisc
player back when they were actually kind of popular, but I recall seeing
pretty high prices in the stores. Can't remember specifics.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 5:57:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Mark,i have to agree with you that LD's have an edge over dvd's when
we're talking audio.I've been into LD since the inception of AC-3 which
is Dolby Digital.That was the highlight for LD and the only way to get
that form of audio for our home theater until dvd was introduced.

That too was an expensive format at least for me at the time.The first
dvd players to be sold were in the $800 or more price range.I have heard
about laser rot but fortunately for me(knock on wood) I have not had any
problems so far with my LD collection.Long live laserdisc!
March 2, 2005 7:01:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"LunarJetman1970" wrote:

(snip)
>
> On a seperate note, and only owners of Analogue PAL Laservision 1980's
> discs will probably know, as I've never seen an NTSC one go the same
> way -What causes some of the discs to go a bronzey colour and get
> mottled 'watermarks' under the disc surface? A lot of these look
> absolutely sh*te but still play!

My original pressing of "Greystoke" developed severe "bronze" spotting on
one of the discs on the first side about a year after I bought it in the
late 80's and it was pretty much the absolute definition of what laser rot
was. The disc became unwatchable and the disc itself looked like it had a
skin disease. I kept it simple to show people that yes, laser rot isn't a
fantasy, it (did) happen.

I also have a few CDs pressed in Europe in the mid 80's that also developed
rot. No spotting, but they gradually turned a bronze/copper color 'til they
almost looked like those expensive Mobile Fidelity Gold Discs - they just
couldn't be played anymore.

Basically, any kind of 'disc" media including dvds that uses a
metal/aluminum thin plate to hold the data and is laminated with a plastic
material via glue bonding could be susceptible to "rot" due to bonding
compound contamination either through dust or moisture in the air at the
factory during the production process or because the bonding compound isn't
chemically correct.

T.B.
March 2, 2005 11:22:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

DTS on laserdisc is at a rate 1235kbps, not the 1509 that was found on
early DTS dvd's. The AC-3 bitrate for laserdisc is at 384kbps. PCM
tracks are around 1411kbps.

Greg


Nitehawk^ wrote:
> Yes, the audio was a huge highlight of LD's, DTS especially with its
> 1509 kbps soundtrack.
> Does anyone know what the AC-3 bitrate on LD's is? or how I can
> determine that?
> I know that DVD uses 768 for DTS, at least I am not aware of any
other
> bitrates on DTS DVD's with the very rare exception of some full
> bitrate DTS DVD's released back in 1999. And AC3/ Dolby Digital is
> 448 kbps (some are 384) on DVD.
> How about Dolby Surround? what bitrates were used on LD?
>
> Ed
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 14:57:59 -0500, mitech@webtv.net wrote:
>
> >Mark,i have to agree with you that LD's have an edge over dvd's when
> >we're talking audio.I've been into LD since the inception of AC-3
which
> >is Dolby Digital.That was the highlight for LD and the only way to
get
> >that form of audio for our home theater until dvd was introduced.
> >
> >That too was an expensive format at least for me at the time.The
first
> >dvd players to be sold were in the $800 or more price range.I have
heard
> >about laser rot but fortunately for me(knock on wood) I have not had
any
> >problems so far with my LD collection.Long live laserdisc!
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 12:41:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Yes, the audio was a huge highlight of LD's, DTS especially with its
1509 kbps soundtrack.
Does anyone know what the AC-3 bitrate on LD's is? or how I can
determine that?
I know that DVD uses 768 for DTS, at least I am not aware of any other
bitrates on DTS DVD's with the very rare exception of some full
bitrate DTS DVD's released back in 1999. And AC3/ Dolby Digital is
448 kbps (some are 384) on DVD.
How about Dolby Surround? what bitrates were used on LD?

Ed




On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 14:57:59 -0500, mitech@webtv.net wrote:

>Mark,i have to agree with you that LD's have an edge over dvd's when
>we're talking audio.I've been into LD since the inception of AC-3 which
>is Dolby Digital.That was the highlight for LD and the only way to get
>that form of audio for our home theater until dvd was introduced.
>
>That too was an expensive format at least for me at the time.The first
>dvd players to be sold were in the $800 or more price range.I have heard
>about laser rot but fortunately for me(knock on wood) I have not had any
>problems so far with my LD collection.Long live laserdisc!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
March 3, 2005 1:07:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"half_eaten" wrote:

> What was the original standard price of LDs anyway? I never had a
> laserdisc
> player back when they were actually kind of popular, but I recall seeing
> pretty high prices in the stores. Can't remember specifics.

Single disc titles usually listed at about $24.99 to $34.99. LDs that were
2 disc titles ran about $34.99 to $49.99. Criterion 2 and 3 disc CAV titles
almost always ran $99.99 to $124.99. Typical box sets with 3 or 4 discs ran
anywhere from $49.99 to usually around $99.99 and up to around $129.99.
Many classical music box sets ran even more. Extravagant box sets like the
original Star Wars CAV set ran $249.99.

Most single disc Japanese import LDs ran about $79.00 to $99.00 and many of
the lavish Japanese tv series box sets ran upwards of $500.00 for say, half
a season of "Lost In Space.

On of the first laserdiscs I bought (and still have) was the 1st pressing of
the Criterion 2 disc box set of "King Kong" from Ken Cranes (when they ahd a
store in the Westminster Mall) for $74.99 back in mid '85.

T.B.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 1:07:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Wow... that's ridiculous! LDs might have actually caught on well if the
prices were lower. I guess they figured only rich people wanted LDs... and
there was a reason for that i guess heh.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 1:07:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 18:57:04 -0500, half_eaten <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:
>Wow... that's ridiculous! LDs might have actually caught on well if the
>prices were lower. I guess they figured only rich people wanted LDs... and
>there was a reason for that i guess heh.

Yeah. Just like tapes. (BTW: tapes started out with movie prices well
over $100 in the 70's.)
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 1:07:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

> half_eaten <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:

> LDs might have actually caught on well if the
> prices were lower. I guess they figured only
> rich people wanted LDs...

a. As has been mentioned, tapes were then priced
for rental and not sell-through. LD prices
were often cheaper than tape when you wanted
to buy (not rent) a hot new release.

b. LD media was expensive to make, perhaps 10x
what it costs to press a DVD.

The size (12") may also have been a barrier to
adoption, as it evoked the "old fashioned" LP.
And the size will probably prevent the 12" format
from ever reappearing, even as a restricted-
circulation medium, such as theatrical HD.

So, to circle back to the basenote, as BTTF jokes
aside:
- no new LD media will be pressed
- no new players will be introduced
- the installed base of media will slowly fade
away from loss, damage, rot (although some
stable platters may last decades yet)
- the players may all have failed before the
last platter is gone

--
Regards, Bob Niland mailto:name@ispname.tld
http://www.access-one.com/rjn email4rjn AT yahoo DOT com
NOT speaking for any employer, client or Internet Service Provider.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 1:14:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I hear alot about the great quality of Kuraray LDs, what are some good
titles released by them to look for? I'll tell you what though, my LD of
Devil's Advocate released by Warner Video is totally flawless. If I sit
down and watch that one and didn't know any better I'd say it was a DVD!
It's crystal-clear.

My Pioneer discs are pretty good too, but not even close to Devil's
Advocate.

-mike
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 3:43:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"half_eaten" <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:D f14b2dae36c1e4ebe88a2b3e1a23b17@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
> What was the original standard price of LDs anyway? I never had a
> laserdisc
> player back when they were actually kind of popular, but I recall
> seeing
> pretty high prices in the stores. Can't remember specifics.

The average MSRP for a movie-only CLV laserdisc was $39.99, which could
usually be found at retail for $34.99. Deluxe box sets such as the
Criterion CAV special editions like Brazil or Pulp Fiction sold for
$124.99. The Star Wars Definitive Collection box set was priced at
$249.99, as I recall.

When Goldeneye was released on LD with a Dolby Digital track, audio
commentary, a couple of featurettes, and a dozen or more trailers for
$49.95 it was considered the LD bargain of the decade. Nowadays a DVD
with that same content would be priced at no more than $19.99.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 3:43:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

>
>When Goldeneye was released on LD with a Dolby Digital track, audio
>commentary, a couple of featurettes, and a dozen or more trailers for
>$49.95 it was considered the LD bargain of the decade.


I do remember when GOLDENEYE was released on LD, I was totally SHOCKED
to find out it was only $49.95, that LD was a full color beautiful
Gatefold double LD, with tons of featurettes, trailers and other
goodies. This type of LD would usually run $69.95 with that much on
it.
March 3, 2005 4:45:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"TCS" wrote:

>>Wow... that's ridiculous! LDs might have actually caught on well if the
>>prices were lower. I guess they figured only rich people wanted LDs... and
>>there was a reason for that i guess heh.
>
> Yeah. Just like tapes. (BTW: tapes started out with movie prices well
> over $100 in the 70's.)

I think "Jaws," "Animal House" and John Carpenter's "The Thing" were two of
the first vhs tapes I bought around 1982 and they were about $89.00 a piece.
I probably bought 3 or 4 movies a year during this time and you can bet they
had to be my absolute favorite movies. Tape rental stores didn't really
start becoming popular until the mid 80's so it was either pay a lot of
money for a movie or subscribe to over-the-air pay tv like "ONTV" in
Southern California and record lots of movies.

It wasn't 'til about '84 that studios started offering vhs tapes at a much
more reasonable price of around $29.95. I remember "Purple Rain" and "The
Empire Strikes back" were enormous sellers because they were among the first
vhs prerecorded tapes to be sold at around $30.

T.B.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 4:45:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

You may have paid $89 for those movies back in 1982, but what did you
pay for a STEREO VCR back then? $900? $1100?? They were extremely
expensive too.
I remember in 1993 paying $800 for a very highend Panasonic S-VHS VCR.
Even then WalMart had VCR's priced at $400 for their most expensive
ones. Long before the days of $39.99 4 head vcr's

Ed


On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 01:45:01 GMT, "TB" <partyslammer@socal.rr.com>
wrote:

>"TCS" wrote:
>
>>>Wow... that's ridiculous! LDs might have actually caught on well if the
>>>prices were lower. I guess they figured only rich people wanted LDs... and
>>>there was a reason for that i guess heh.
>>
>> Yeah. Just like tapes. (BTW: tapes started out with movie prices well
>> over $100 in the 70's.)
>
>I think "Jaws," "Animal House" and John Carpenter's "The Thing" were two of
>the first vhs tapes I bought around 1982 and they were about $89.00 a piece.
>I probably bought 3 or 4 movies a year during this time and you can bet they
>had to be my absolute favorite movies. Tape rental stores didn't really
>start becoming popular until the mid 80's so it was either pay a lot of
>money for a movie or subscribe to over-the-air pay tv like "ONTV" in
>Southern California and record lots of movies.
>
>It wasn't 'til about '84 that studios started offering vhs tapes at a much
>more reasonable price of around $29.95. I remember "Purple Rain" and "The
>Empire Strikes back" were enormous sellers because they were among the first
>vhs prerecorded tapes to be sold at around $30.
>
>T.B.
>
March 3, 2005 6:41:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

"Nitehawk^" wrote:

You may have paid $89 for those movies back in 1982, but what did you
> pay for a STEREO VCR back then? $900? $1100?? They were extremely
> expensive too.
> I remember in 1993 paying $800 for a very highend Panasonic S-VHS VCR.
> Even then WalMart had VCR's priced at $400 for their most expensive
> ones. Long before the days of $39.99 4 head vcr's

My first VCR were a huge table top Panasonic mono deck top loader weighing
about 30 lbs with a 24 hour timer and a channel "dial." I don't even
remember what I paid for that beats but I bought it around 1980-'81. It
featured a faux wood finish on the sides and looked out of date even when I
bought it new.

My second which I bought around 1982 was a Panasonic stereo deck that was
pretty cool for it's time. It was a two piece unit, meaning the deck that
played tapes was one piece that had a rechargeable nickel battery and the
other piece was the tuner and they were joined together by a couple av/power
cables. It was for people who were using "cam-corders," actually huge video
cameras that you had to hook to a deck like the Panasonic to actually record
on to a vhs tape. I think I paid about $995.00 for that thing and quite
honestly, it was a great player and lasted until about 1992.

T.B.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 6:41:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

5 years ago, I bought an awesome VCR for $700. It's an Aiwa MX100 HI-FI
with completely digital video processing(until it goes onto the tape of
course) and it supports 5 world-wide video formats.. NTSC, PAL, SECAM,
M-PAL, and N-PAL. Got a nice jog wheel too. It's a very nice machine, and
I needed a multi-format video for converting a bunch of bootleg concert
videos I had received from europe. Plus I am now able to send home videos
to my friends and family in Germany.

This thing also has a recording "indexing" feature where when you are
recording on a tape, it will remember each position on the tape where you
started a new recording down to 1 second.

In retrospect, $700 is like.. WAY too much but it's still a
state-of-the-art machine even now. When you record on a blank tape with it
though, the quality is amazing. Never seen another VCR record such a clear
picture!

-Mike
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 6:41:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 22:59:50 -0500, half_eaten <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote:
>5 years ago, I bought an awesome VCR for $700. It's an Aiwa MX100 HI-FI
>with completely digital video processing(until it goes onto the tape of

20 years ago I bought an awesome hifi VCR for $400, about $800 in today's
dollars. It was the first hifi I saw for less than $800 and did absolutely
nothing. It still used tuner presets and couldn't randomly tune any station;
at least the 16 presets were electronicaly set instead of the more common use
of little tuner thumbwheels.

It lasted 3 years before it's first idler wheel wore out. Next one wore out
after 2 years; last one lasted two years and then I chucked the thing around
'93. Add $300 for repairs to that intitial $400.
March 3, 2005 8:13:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I agree about the Kurray Faces discs having less specks, but I also
find them to be more red, especially in flesh tones. I find the USA
pressings to have more accurate flesh tones. But I do agree that they
are generally better quality.


test wrote:
> That's what I said in a previous mail.... compare a
> Kuraray/Mitsubishi/Pioneer Japan pressing with a Pioneer USA edition
and you
> will agree with me that Pioneer USA wasn't that good as you thought
to be.
>
> The Japanese pressing plants were simply the best but -again- also
had their
> rotproblems.
>
> As for Kuraray pressings... when buying the Star Wars Faces editions
try to
> find the Kuraray ones. The first pressing made by Pioneer USA had -as

> always- rolling white lines/specks problems. The Kuraray pressings
are
> almost perfect.
> Some of the later Disneys (Little Mermaid CAV, Mary Poppins) are made
by K.
> and are indeed a joy to look at.
>
> Have fun,
> Roy
>
> "half_eaten" <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:ed2660e58435ac35d782be77345b639c@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
> >I hear alot about the great quality of Kuraray LDs, what are some
good
> > titles released by them to look for? I'll tell you what though, my
LD of
> > Devil's Advocate released by Warner Video is totally flawless. If I
sit
> > down and watch that one and didn't know any better I'd say it was a
DVD!
> > It's crystal-clear.
> >
> > My Pioneer discs are pretty good too, but not even close to Devil's
> > Advocate.
> >
> > -mike
> >
March 3, 2005 12:02:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

That's what I said in a previous mail.... compare a
Kuraray/Mitsubishi/Pioneer Japan pressing with a Pioneer USA edition and you
will agree with me that Pioneer USA wasn't that good as you thought to be.

The Japanese pressing plants were simply the best but -again- also had their
rotproblems.

As for Kuraray pressings... when buying the Star Wars Faces editions try to
find the Kuraray ones. The first pressing made by Pioneer USA had -as
always- rolling white lines/specks problems. The Kuraray pressings are
almost perfect.
Some of the later Disneys (Little Mermaid CAV, Mary Poppins) are made by K.
and are indeed a joy to look at.

Have fun,
Roy

"half_eaten" <half_eaten@nospam.yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ed2660e58435ac35d782be77345b639c@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
>I hear alot about the great quality of Kuraray LDs, what are some good
> titles released by them to look for? I'll tell you what though, my LD of
> Devil's Advocate released by Warner Video is totally flawless. If I sit
> down and watch that one and didn't know any better I'd say it was a DVD!
> It's crystal-clear.
>
> My Pioneer discs are pretty good too, but not even close to Devil's
> Advocate.
>
> -mike
>
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 6:55:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Yes, I agree with Ed, there are many LD's in my collection that will
stay there because of the quality of the release - Just like you said,
the Highlander releases are difficult to beat, right down from the
gorgeous tripe gatefold embossed sleeves to the really good transfer
and superb AC3 soundtrack, these are discs that I will be hanging on to
for some time. But as you say, there are certain releases from the 80's
and early 90's that dont really look that great when viewed on our
modern TV's, Plasmas or Projectors. A lot of the earlier discs look
like direct transfers from VCR, with muffled sound and poor picture,
most often pan & scan. The only discs I look to hang on to from this
era are those that either hold some sentimental value or that are not
available on DVD at this time. Certain titles, like Silent Running, for
example, I will keep just for the sake of it, as I like the film.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 8:03:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

> Oh, and before I forget, a big thanks to Julien Wilk and all of the
> members at lddb for making it my definitive source of information on
> all things Laser.

Thanks!

Now back from vacation... "only" 520 updates left to process! It's
gonna take some time but eventually I'll go through it soon.

Rgds,
Julien
--
http://LDDb.com/ - Laserdisc Database
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 11:10:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

welcome back Julien, hope you had a great and relaxing time.

Ed


On 3 Mar 2005 17:03:19 -0800, "Julien Wilk" <generikz@gmail.com>
wrote:

>> Oh, and before I forget, a big thanks to Julien Wilk and all of the
>> members at lddb for making it my definitive source of information on
>> all things Laser.
>
>Thanks!
>
>Now back from vacation... "only" 520 updates left to process! It's
>gonna take some time but eventually I'll go through it soon.
>
>Rgds,
>Julien
Anonymous
March 5, 2005 6:21:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

After reading this thread I fired up my Pioneer CLD-D704 yesterday
to watch a couple of discs. It made me think about buying my first
LD player back in 1987 (Pioneer CLD-1030/still works!)
I didn't buy many discs during LD's long run as they were always
a little too expensive for my budget but I was fortunate to have
Laserland on Long Island, NY to rent anything I wanted to watch.
I probably only purchased about 50 discs until of course everyone sold
off their collections when DVD came about. I ended up purchasing a lot
of titles that I had always wanted. I have about 300 discs now and
have pretty much found every title that I ever wanted.
Watching my discs yesterday I was still impressed by LD's
quality. We all have to remember that from the mid 80's to the start
of DVD(1997?) LD was the best way to watch video at home. My
Hitachi 50" rear screen and Pioneer surround receiver provided many
hours of pleasant viewing at a very reasonable cost.
February 2, 2013 3:36:47 PM

Quote:
Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Hi All

I'm a newcomer to the usenet scene so bear with me if I'm talking
drivel or repeating a conversation you had last week. Its great to see
this group so active and that we have so many LD devotees still out
there. I've been into Laserdiscs for over a year now, you can say I was
a late embracer of the technology :o ) Having purchased a player and
discs on ebay, I've never looked back, and now I buy and sell them on
ebay as a hobby.

I think the format is great. Tactile objects, great cover art, great
picture quality on a well mastered disc, stunning audio, those ohhh so
lavish box sets, I could go on. Most of the people who know me think
I'm mad, but they soon change their tune when they experience a good
AC3/DTS & THX mastered disc in full tilt. I'm not saying that DVD isn't
superb in its own right, its just that there's something about LD's, I
can quite put my finger on it, maybe its cause I'm old enough to
remember vinyl :o )

So, I wonder what will happen to LD's over the next few years. Will
people be desperate to sell off collections and trade up to more modern
formats? With the production of new players now over, will existing
ones end up fetching stupidly high prices? I've almost given up on
getting a HLD-X9 for a half decent price already! And good old 'Laser
Rot' - A subject that has had many discussions i'm sure - Searching
back through the posts here shows that people were really concerned
about it a few years back - I wont say I haven't come across it, as I
have, but I wonder if the mid to late 90's pressings will have shown
any problems by now and wont deteriorate further on the shelf. I would
love to think I could enjoy my collection for years to come. Do people
think that discs themselves will become more valuable in the future?
With the number of LD only titles getting smaller and smaller, as
releases finally make their way to DVD, what do you think will happen
to their value? Even a common title like Aladdin fetched far more when
it was LD only.

I just wondered what LD devotees can see in their crystal balls :o )
Looking forward to hearing some views.

Oh, and before I forget, a big thanks to Julien Wilk and all of the
members at lddb for making it my definitive source of information on
all things Laser.

My regards, Mark

!