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New here, CLD-1010 Questions and more

Last response: in Home Theatre Legacy
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April 27, 2005 12:17:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I signed up for an account at totalvideo.org, which turned out to be a
total waste, as I made a lenghty post which strangely does not show up at
all. Hopefully this works... I am bummed because I had explained my
thoughts rather well but now I am stuck trying to remember what I had
thought/typed a couple weeks ago. So....


I purchased a Pioneer CLD-1010 off eBay for $60 + shipping very recently.
I have read before that it runs cheaper usually, but lately it has been
selling around what I paid. I am aware of the player using a "red" laser.
Anyways, I received it, and everything functions properly as far as I can
tell. I notice now well built this machine is, much sturdy than my mid-90s
Pioneer machine (a CLD-D503). During my testing, I noticed some things
which left me wondering if this player needs a "tune up". I played this on
a 32" Sony Triniton as well as a cheap 19" Sylvania set. I tested with a
THX LD of 'The Terminator' as well as a badly defective (inclusion? audio
is staticy and the video is just littered with pink/blue grain to it) copy
of 'Whitesnake Live! Commandos'. I ended up comparing the two in the end,
both by using the composite outs (since it would be unfair to use the
503's S-Video out). I played 'The Terminator' on the 1010 and noticed that
the entire picture has very thin light streaks running (horizontally)
across the screen. Also, I notice that when the IMAGE logo is on the
screen, it looks like it is double imposed, sort of. With my 503, neither
of these problems are there. There is no streaking, and the IMAGE logo
isn't double imposed. What concerns me most is near the end of side 1 on
the movie, when there are really dark scenes such as in the parking
complex, is that the 1010 was displaying crazy amounts of (judging from
picture examples from Leopold's defect list) "crosstalk" in which there
was almost like thick groups of wavy lines running across the screen. This
totally irrated me, and once again I tried it with my 503 and none of that
was there. As far as sharpness, they appeared the same really. Honestly, I
prefer the 503 due to all of this, and I'm really left wondering if the
1010 needs some tweaking. Everything operates fine, the platter switching
functions as it should, but the picture just looks very poor to me. I
tried cleaning the player with a lens cleaning LD disc but nothing has
changed. I noticed the streaking during the video portions of the cleaning
disc also. The only thing I found the 1010 peforming better on was with
the Whitesnake disc. The 1010 seemed to handle the audio on the disc fine
whereas on the 503 it has intermittent static to it.

More about : cld 1010 questions

Anonymous
April 27, 2005 3:19:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

A properly adjusted 1010 should be as noise free as your 503 and have a
sharper picture. Hate to say it but the cost to ship and tune up the unit
is more than you paid for the player. These units are nice and pretty much
unknown, only problem is single sided and no AC-3 RF.

Kurtis

"BrianL" <stormbringer81@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:42522d823ec54b99f60319e807187ceb@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
>I signed up for an account at totalvideo.org, which turned out to be a
> total waste, as I made a lenghty post which strangely does not show up at
> all. Hopefully this works... I am bummed because I had explained my
> thoughts rather well but now I am stuck trying to remember what I had
> thought/typed a couple weeks ago. So....
>
>
> I purchased a Pioneer CLD-1010 off eBay for $60 + shipping very recently.
> I have read before that it runs cheaper usually, but lately it has been
> selling around what I paid. I am aware of the player using a "red" laser.
> Anyways, I received it, and everything functions properly as far as I can
> tell. I notice now well built this machine is, much sturdy than my mid-90s
> Pioneer machine (a CLD-D503). During my testing, I noticed some things
> which left me wondering if this player needs a "tune up". I played this on
> a 32" Sony Triniton as well as a cheap 19" Sylvania set. I tested with a
> THX LD of 'The Terminator' as well as a badly defective (inclusion? audio
> is staticy and the video is just littered with pink/blue grain to it) copy
> of 'Whitesnake Live! Commandos'. I ended up comparing the two in the end,
> both by using the composite outs (since it would be unfair to use the
> 503's S-Video out). I played 'The Terminator' on the 1010 and noticed that
> the entire picture has very thin light streaks running (horizontally)
> across the screen. Also, I notice that when the IMAGE logo is on the
> screen, it looks like it is double imposed, sort of. With my 503, neither
> of these problems are there. There is no streaking, and the IMAGE logo
> isn't double imposed. What concerns me most is near the end of side 1 on
> the movie, when there are really dark scenes such as in the parking
> complex, is that the 1010 was displaying crazy amounts of (judging from
> picture examples from Leopold's defect list) "crosstalk" in which there
> was almost like thick groups of wavy lines running across the screen. This
> totally irrated me, and once again I tried it with my 503 and none of that
> was there. As far as sharpness, they appeared the same really. Honestly, I
> prefer the 503 due to all of this, and I'm really left wondering if the
> 1010 needs some tweaking. Everything operates fine, the platter switching
> functions as it should, but the picture just looks very poor to me. I
> tried cleaning the player with a lens cleaning LD disc but nothing has
> changed. I noticed the streaking during the video portions of the cleaning
> disc also. The only thing I found the 1010 peforming better on was with
> the Whitesnake disc. The 1010 seemed to handle the audio on the disc fine
> whereas on the 503 it has intermittent static to it.
>
April 27, 2005 5:12:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Do local Pioneer repair centers do basic maintenance like fine
adjustments/alignment/etc? I remember reading D.C. for general repairs.. I
have the feeling that if I purchase another, the same thing may be the
case again. I'm aware the thing is 18 years old.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 9:31:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

Depends on where you live, not many centers were very good even in LD's
prime.

Kurtis

"BrianL" <stormbringer81@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:D f84a4322b6fbe2473400c87f305cc30@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
> Do local Pioneer repair centers do basic maintenance like fine
> adjustments/alignment/etc? I remember reading D.C. for general repairs.. I
> have the feeling that if I purchase another, the same thing may be the
> case again. I'm aware the thing is 18 years old.
>
April 28, 2005 5:27:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I'm in the Cleveland (OH) area, I'll have to check on some places. I do
know of one place that deals with vintage audio (old Nakamichi cassette
decks, Linn turntables, 70s Marantz, etc) but none for video off the top
of my head.
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 9:40:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

This series of player was famous for tilt sensor failure, which will result
in crosstalk.
And Kurtis is more than correct... when LD was still a viable format very
few "authorized" service centers knew how to service them.

"BrianL" <stormbringer81@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:bc97225d86629a3bcda288c8a0ec6864@localhost.talkaboutvideo.com...
> I'm in the Cleveland (OH) area, I'll have to check on some places. I do
> know of one place that deals with vintage audio (old Nakamichi cassette
> decks, Linn turntables, 70s Marantz, etc) but none for video off the top
> of my head.
>
April 29, 2005 1:56:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

How much of a problem is this (if it is the case)? Seriously, all these
weird problems with various models at times makes me want to give up on
the format. A lot of the time you can't even hold it against the seller,
because things like this show no blatant problems and to the untrained eye
probably look normal. It's as if the only place it seems that I can get a
unit w/o problems would be from someone who repairs them or a refurbed or
new unit (which as far as I know, the only one left is the DVL-919).
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 3:36:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

It's true... the VAST majority of players that you get directly from
ebay will either be broken or out of alignment.
I average only about 1 out of 5 laserdisc players recieved via ebay to
be in good working order!
You've hit the nail on the head. The best way to get a fully
functioning player is to buy one from Kurtis or Duncan of Bayview
Electronics.
Kurtis does advertise the odd player here in the ng. Many have
purchased great players from Kurtis that he stands behind.
Duncan has loads of players on hand that he can refurbish for resale.
Duncan doesn't advertise here in the ng. so you'd have to visit his
website and email him.
Here's a link to his site:
www.laserdiscservice.com
I can also heartily recommend Duncan. He's the best of the official
Pioneer Service Technicians. He still has a laserdisc repair shop and
the vast majority of the work that he does at his shop is laserdisc
player oriented.
So, my advice? If you want a player that's in perfect operating order,
with no crosstalk or playability problems.. DON'T look to ebay!
Give Kurtis or Duncan a holler and see what they have kicking around
for resale.
Kevin
April 29, 2005 11:50:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.laserdisc (More info?)

I agree with Kevin. If you are wanting to get a player from a United
States source, I would start with Duncan and Kurtis. They are both
highly skilled and knowledgable. I would rather pay a little more and
get a good player from them than take chances on ebay.


Kevin Hawerchuk wrote:
> It's true... the VAST majority of players that you get directly from
> ebay will either be broken or out of alignment.
> I average only about 1 out of 5 laserdisc players recieved via ebay
to
> be in good working order!
> You've hit the nail on the head. The best way to get a fully
> functioning player is to buy one from Kurtis or Duncan of Bayview
> Electronics.
> Kurtis does advertise the odd player here in the ng. Many have
> purchased great players from Kurtis that he stands behind.
> Duncan has loads of players on hand that he can refurbish for
resale.
> Duncan doesn't advertise here in the ng. so you'd have to visit his
> website and email him.
> Here's a link to his site:
> www.laserdiscservice.com
> I can also heartily recommend Duncan. He's the best of the official
> Pioneer Service Technicians. He still has a laserdisc repair shop and
> the vast majority of the work that he does at his shop is laserdisc
> player oriented.
> So, my advice? If you want a player that's in perfect operating
order,
> with no crosstalk or playability problems.. DON'T look to ebay!
> Give Kurtis or Duncan a holler and see what they have kicking
around
> for resale.
> Kevin
!