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Video Editing/Graphic Design PC Dilemma

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February 5, 2013 1:59:20 PM

Hi, I am currently using a six year old Celeron 430 M 1.6Ghz/1.5GB DDR2 laptop which until recent times have served me well for doing print & web designs. I started to learn motion graphics and 3d animation and now the system cannot serve my demands, and I'm thinking of getting a new system. But I have very limited experience about the performance of new multi-core PC's.

According to my research I have decided that a Quard-Core i7 with 8+ GB RAM and possibly a seperate Graphics Adapter is ideal for my requirements. Now I am considering two systems - one a desktop and the other a laptop. I'm quite confused what to choose.

The Desktop setup:
i7-3770k
A Z77 chipset motherboard
16GB-1600-DDR3
500 HDD
(no seperate graphics)

The Laptop Specifications
Acer Aspire V3-571 73614G75
i7-3610QM
HM77 Chipset
4GB DDR3 (max 8GB)
2GB nVidia GT640M Graphics

I am aware that the desktop is faster than the laptop, but how much faster will it be? If the performance difference is about 20% I think I will go for the laptop. But if the laptop really sucks when it comes to handling moderatly complex Adobe AE projects, 3DS max stuff & simulations i think the desktop would be the choice.

Can anyone please help me decide. Thanks.
a b D Laptop
February 5, 2013 2:11:02 PM

The performance difference is going to be huge.

You're talking about a quad core with hyperthreading running at over 3GHz (which can easily be pushed to over 4GHz with a mild overclock) vs a bare quad core running at 2.3 GHz.

Then factor in the possible lack of ram on the laptop, the fact that the hard drive will be faster on the desktop, AND the fact that you can upgrade it, which you can't with the laptop...

Have you considered buying the parts and making your own computer? It really only takes a couple hours, a screwdriver, and a youtube video - it's pretty simple. (And we can walk you through what parts to get.)
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 5, 2013 2:33:39 PM

you could save quite a bit of money:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V2 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($65.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 6450 1GB Video Card ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $474.94
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-05 11:29 EST-0500)

getting a Xeon E3-1230 has the same cores/hyperthreading, turbo boost and cache as an i7 but without the igpu (or overclocking of a "K" series). but your saving $90 - $60 after getting a graphics card. since your won't be overclocking, you can get a B75 chipset (which is compatible with the xeon) for less $ than a Z77 set up.

just some thoughts, take it or leave it, its all good.
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a b D Laptop
February 5, 2013 4:01:48 PM

Anonymous said:
you could save quite a bit of money:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V2 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($233.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Asus P8B75-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($65.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($49.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 6450 1GB Video Card ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $474.94
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-05 11:29 EST-0500)


getting a Xeon E3-1230 has the same cores/hyperthreading, turbo boost and cache as an i7 but without the igpu (or overclocking of a "K" series). but your saving $90 - $60 after getting a graphics card. since your won't be overclocking, you can get a B75 chipset (which is compatible with the xeon) for less $ than a Z77 set up.

just some thoughts, take it or leave it, its all good.


Why would you get such a cheap bare bones GPU for video editing? Honestly the onboard HD 4000 is better than a Radeon 6450. Even most laptop GPUs are better than a $29 card.

The one thing you have to keep in mind is that laptop CPUs and GPUs are nowhere near the equivalent of their desktop counterparts. This was discovered last year when NVIDIA released the GTX 580M: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-6990m-gef...
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
February 5, 2013 6:24:35 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Why would you get such a cheap bare bones GPU for video editing? Honestly the onboard HD 4000 is better than a Radeon 6450. Even most laptop GPUs are better than a $29 card.

The one thing you have to keep in mind is that laptop CPUs and GPUs are nowhere near the equivalent of their desktop counterparts. This was discovered last year when NVIDIA released the GTX 580M: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-6990m-gef...

yes and no.

i picked a cheap gpu to compansate for the lack of the igpu. when it comes to video editing the highest quality is still the software based cpu rendering/encoding. (no?)

so the 6450 is strictly to use for viewing the desktop . . .
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February 15, 2013 3:31:55 AM

Hi guys, thanks alot for the responses.


I have evaluated my situation and it demands for mobility. Is going for the laptop a "really" bad choice? If I can run moderately complex project very smoothly then I think that the laptop is good for now.

What are your opinions on this? Thanks.
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February 15, 2013 3:54:15 AM

Get an i7-something with Q letter at the end.

It's still good :) .
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