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good fisheye lens for 20D

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September 24, 2005 1:38:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Hi All,

I want to get an ultra wide lens for my 20D mainly to use for interior
architecture and panoramas. I'll be using Panorama Tools to correct the
distortion and do the stitching etc. so the barrel distortion of a
fisheye shouldn't be a problem.

The only fisheye that Canon produces is the 15mm, which I know wont
really look like a fisheye on the 20D because of the sensor cropping.
However it'd still probably be wide enough for my purposes. Another lens
I've been looking at is the 8mm f4 Sigma. I understand this would become
pretty much like a full-frame fisheye with the 1.6x sensor. It's a fair
bit cheaper, at just over $1000 AUD.

How would the image quality compare with these lenses. Is there
something else I should be looking at?

I should just mention that I don't care at all about AF. I'll most
likely be using manual focus most of the time anyway. In fact I'd be
happiest if I could find a good quality manual focus lens, with a decent
focus ring. I don't like the manual focus ring on my other two Canon lenses.

Thanks,

Eugene

More about : good fisheye lens 20d

Anonymous
September 24, 2005 1:38:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <dh23ku$iec$1@otis.netspace.net.au>, Eugene
<nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes
>Hi All,
>
>I want to get an ultra wide lens for my 20D mainly to use for interior
>architecture and panoramas. I'll be using Panorama Tools to correct the
>distortion and do the stitching etc. so the barrel distortion of a
>fisheye shouldn't be a problem.
>
>The only fisheye that Canon produces is the 15mm, which I know wont
>really look like a fisheye on the 20D because of the sensor cropping.
>However it'd still probably be wide enough for my purposes. Another
>lens I've been looking at is the 8mm f4 Sigma. I understand this would
>become pretty much like a full-frame fisheye with the 1.6x sensor. It's
>a fair bit cheaper, at just over $1000 AUD.
>
>How would the image quality compare with these lenses. Is there
>something else I should be looking at?
>
>I should just mention that I don't care at all about AF. I'll most
>likely be using manual focus most of the time anyway. In fact I'd be
>happiest if I could find a good quality manual focus lens, with a
>decent focus ring. I don't like the manual focus ring on my other two
>Canon lenses.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Eugene

You asked almost the same question a couple of weeks ago. The advice you
got then still holds good: if you use an ultra-wide for panoramas, you
make life much more difficult for yourself, and doubly so with a
fisheye.

Personally for interior architecture I think there is nothing to beat
(or even come close to) the TS-E 24mm f/3.5L. Quality is excellent.

But if you manage to get good results with a fisheye, do come back and
tell us about it. Most of us would be interested to learn.

David

--
David Littlewood
September 24, 2005 1:38:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Eugene wrote:

> Is there
> something else I should be looking at?

The peleng lens isn't bad and is 1/4 of the sigma price.. build quality
isn't outstanding but optically seems good to me.

--

Stacey
Related resources
Anonymous
September 24, 2005 4:35:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 09:38:15 +1000, Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com>
wrote:

>Hi All,
>
>I want to get an ultra wide lens for my 20D mainly to use for interior
>architecture and panoramas. I'll be using Panorama Tools to correct the
>distortion and do the stitching etc. so the barrel distortion of a
>fisheye shouldn't be a problem.
>
>The only fisheye that Canon produces is the 15mm, which I know wont
>really look like a fisheye on the 20D because of the sensor cropping.
>However it'd still probably be wide enough for my purposes. Another lens
>I've been looking at is the 8mm f4 Sigma. I understand this would become
>pretty much like a full-frame fisheye with the 1.6x sensor. It's a fair
>bit cheaper, at just over $1000 AUD.
>
>How would the image quality compare with these lenses. Is there
>something else I should be looking at?
>
>I should just mention that I don't care at all about AF. I'll most
>likely be using manual focus most of the time anyway. In fact I'd be
>happiest if I could find a good quality manual focus lens, with a decent
>focus ring. I don't like the manual focus ring on my other two Canon lenses.

Take a look at the 8mm Peleng.

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic2/243005/0#201369...

above like has some samples.

Here's more on fish eyes with APS-C crop cameras.

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/reviews/wide-angle...


*********************************************************

"I have been a witness, and these pictures are
my testimony. The events I have recorded should
not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

-James Nachtwey-
http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
September 24, 2005 4:47:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Thanks David,

Thanks for your suggestions. I do appreciate the feedback I got from my
other post. I know it will be a bit of a quality tradeoff using a really
wide angle lens. However from the examples I've seen on the web I think
it would probably be OK for my purposes. A narrower lens would also make
it more time consuming to photograph the panoramas, and I'd need a more
complex arrangement for tilting and rotating around the nodal point. If
I can do all the shots without having to tilt the camera vertically that
will make things much quicker and easier.

I'm planning to also use the lens for other purposes such as general
landscape shots etc. An 8mm circular fisheye may be a little wider than
I need, but I figured with the crop factor it would take it back to a
more practical FOV.

The TS-E lenses do look fantastic, and I always liked being able to do
focal plane shifting when I've used large format view cameras. However
these lenses unfortunately are out of my price range at this stage.

Eugene

>
>
> You asked almost the same question a couple of weeks ago. The advice you
> got then still holds good: if you use an ultra-wide for panoramas, you
> make life much more difficult for yourself, and doubly so with a fisheye.
>
> Personally for interior architecture I think there is nothing to beat
> (or even come close to) the TS-E 24mm f/3.5L. Quality is excellent.
>
> But if you manage to get good results with a fisheye, do come back and
> tell us about it. Most of us would be interested to learn.
>
> David
>
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 8:45:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> writes:

> Eugene wrote:
>
> > Is there
> > something else I should be looking at?
>
> The peleng lens isn't bad and is 1/4 of the sigma price.. build quality
> isn't outstanding but optically seems good to me.

Sounds like it just-barely-clears or sometimes *doesn't* clear the
mirror on a lot of models. Including my Fuji S2. Which rather
reduces *my* interest in it. The "just barely clears" depends on
focus setting, which seems like a high-risk situation to me, too.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
September 26, 2005 2:37:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I have to agree with David. If you try using a fisheye for pano shots
you are going to drive yourself INSANE!
Drifter
"I've been here, I've been there..."
September 26, 2005 4:31:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

David Dyer-Bennet wrote:

> Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> writes:
>
>> Eugene wrote:
>>
>> > Is there
>> > something else I should be looking at?
>>
>> The peleng lens isn't bad and is 1/4 of the sigma price.. build quality
>> isn't outstanding but optically seems good to me.
>
> Sounds like it just-barely-clears or sometimes *doesn't* clear the
> mirror on a lot of models.

Someone else has said that before, I think it's turned into an "urban
legend"? I suppose it does depend on the lens mount.


> Including my Fuji S2. Which rather
> reduces *my* interest in it. The "just barely clears" depends on
> focus setting, which seems like a high-risk situation to me, too.

Hmm I just looked at mine and I couldn't see the rear element move at all
when focusing. I suppose it depends on the specific mount, mounted on an OM
adapter for my E300, it's no where NEAR protruding from the mount or
anywhere close to hitting the mirror. Have you actually seen one of these
in a mount for your camera to know this to be a fact? Or just repeating
what you read someone else say they heard from someone who read it
somewhere on the web....

--

Stacey
Anonymous
September 26, 2005 2:40:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"David Dyer-Bennet" <dd-b@dd-b.net> wrote in message
news:87mzm0u8hy.fsf@gw.dd-b.net...
> Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> writes:
>
> > Eugene wrote:
> >
> > > Is there
> > > something else I should be looking at?
> >
> > The peleng lens isn't bad and is 1/4 of the sigma price.. build quality
> > isn't outstanding but optically seems good to me.
>
> Sounds like it just-barely-clears or sometimes *doesn't* clear the
> mirror on a lot of models. Including my Fuji S2. Which rather
> reduces *my* interest in it. The "just barely clears" depends on
> focus setting, which seems like a high-risk situation to me, too.


Here is a profile shot of a Peleng next to a Sigma kit lens (both with
Pentax adapters).
http://mendosus.com/jpg/peleng.jpg
The extra back-space on the Peleng is minimal - 1.5-2mm maybe.
The focussing on the Peleng is entirely internal - neither the rear nor the
front elements move at all.

--
Jeff R.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:38:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:

> Hi All,
>
> I want to get an ultra wide lens for my 20D mainly to use for interior
> architecture and panoramas. I'll be using Panorama Tools to correct
> the distortion and do the stitching etc. so the barrel distortion of a
> fisheye shouldn't be a problem.
>
> The only fisheye that Canon produces is the 15mm, which I know wont
> really look like a fisheye on the 20D because of the sensor
> cropping. However it'd still probably be wide enough for my
> purposes. Another lens I've been looking at is the 8mm f4 Sigma. I
> understand this would become pretty much like a full-frame fisheye
> with the 1.6x sensor. It's a fair bit cheaper, at just over $1000 AUD.
>
> How would the image quality compare with these lenses. Is there
> something else I should be looking at?
>
> I should just mention that I don't care at all about AF. I'll most
> likely be using manual focus most of the time anyway. In fact I'd be
> happiest if I could find a good quality manual focus lens, with a
> decent focus ring. I don't like the manual focus ring on my other two
> Canon lenses.

Hmm. I don't think the 20D has mirror lockup; otherwise, the
Voigtlander 12mm and 15mm rectilinear lenses might be just the ticket.

--
-Stephen H. Westin
Any information or opinions in this message are mine: they do not
represent the position of Cornell University or any of its sponsors.
Anonymous
September 28, 2005 2:38:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

<westin@graphics.cornell.nospam.edu> wrote in message
news:s0wtl16yvu.fsf@kingslake.graphics.cornell.edu...
> Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:
>
>
> Hmm. I don't think the 20D has mirror lockup; otherwise, the
> Voigtlander 12mm and 15mm rectilinear lenses might be just the ticket.
>
> --
> -Stephen H. Westin
> Any information or opinions in this message are mine: they do not
> represent the position of Cornell University or any of its sponsors.

The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 3:48:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In message <XTz_e.291828$E95.115860@fed1read01>,
"Jay Beckman" <jnsbeckman@cox.net> wrote:

><westin@graphics.cornell.nospam.edu> wrote in message
>news:s0wtl16yvu.fsf@kingslake.graphics.cornell.edu...
>> Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:
>>
>>
>> Hmm. I don't think the 20D has mirror lockup; otherwise, the
>> Voigtlander 12mm and 15mm rectilinear lenses might be just the ticket.
>>
>> --
>> -Stephen H. Westin
>> Any information or opinions in this message are mine: they do not
>> represent the position of Cornell University or any of its sponsors.
>
>The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...

Of course, it would be a lot more convenient if you didn't have to go
into custom functions to use it. The manufacturers are always thinking
about the user. It would be impossible to enable MLU by pressing one of
the other buttons and the shutter button at the same time!


--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 11:39:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Eugene wrote:
> >
> > OK, you compose the image, lock the mirror up, and take the shot. How
> > tough is that?
>
> OK, now try composing a shot with the camera sitting on the ground. Or
> perhaps try composing a shot where to get the best view you have to have
> the camera right up against another wall. I've owned a G3 now for 2 and
> a half years and I can tell you that there are lots of situations where
> the swivel screen is a God send. It allows you to compose shots that
> would be virtually impossible to manage with an SLR viewfinder.

I'm pretty sure they still make accessories for angle viewing with an
SLR. Should fit DSLRs, too.

Maybe, some day, some maker will get back to the early Canono F1
concept of a slip off pentaprism. Slide it back, and get as low as you
like, or hold it overhead to shot. I had that in '69, IIRC on the date.
We've progressed right on past that, and the easy-to-change screens.
September 29, 2005 2:55:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

It doesn't have the kind of mirror lock-up that I think Stephen is
refering to. Yes with the custom function it can be instructed to flip
the mirror up momentarily before taking the exposure, to minimise
vibrations. However this wont help at all if you're using a lens which
extends too far into the body. The mirror will still drop down again
hitting the rear element of the lens.

>
>
> The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...
>
>
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 2:55:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:

> It doesn't have the kind of mirror lock-up that I think Stephen is
> refering to. Yes with the custom function it can be instructed to flip
> the mirror up momentarily before taking the exposure, to minimise
> vibrations. However this wont help at all if you're using a lens which
> extends too far into the body. The mirror will still drop down again
> hitting the rear element of the lens.
>
>> The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...

Yup, that's what I meant. Not "lock the mirror up for a few seconds to
reduce vibration", but "lock the mirror up and keep it there, because
I'm going to stick something in there that needs the space."

--
-Stephen H. Westin
Any information or opinions in this message are mine: they do not
represent the position of Cornell University or any of its sponsors.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 2:55:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

westin@graphics.cornell.nospam.edu wrote:
> Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:
>
>> It doesn't have the kind of mirror lock-up that I think Stephen is
>> refering to. Yes with the custom function it can be instructed to
>> flip the mirror up momentarily before taking the exposure, to
>> minimise vibrations. However this wont help at all if you're using a
>> lens which extends too far into the body. The mirror will still drop
>> down again hitting the rear element of the lens.
>>
>>> The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...
>
> Yup, that's what I meant. Not "lock the mirror up for a few seconds to
> reduce vibration", but "lock the mirror up and keep it there, because
> I'm going to stick something in there that needs the space."

If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...

David
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 2:55:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <iKO_e.117705$G8.49901@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, David J
Taylor
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid>
wrote:

> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...

You've got a live preview...it's called *THE VIEWFINDER*.
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 5:20:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <iKO_e.117705$G8.49901@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, David J
> Taylor
> <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid>
> wrote:
>
>> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>
> You've got a live preview...it's called *THE VIEWFINDER*.

Not with the mirror locked up, as was suggested.

David
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 5:20:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <xSR_e.117821$G8.32825@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk>, David J
Taylor
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid>
wrote:

> > You've got a live preview...it's called *THE VIEWFINDER*.
>
> Not with the mirror locked up, as was suggested.

OK, you compose the image, lock the mirror up, and take the shot. How
tough is that?
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 9:25:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <dhghgu$fe$1@otis.netspace.net.au>, Eugene
<nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes
>
>> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>> David

>Amen to that! I like being able to change lenses etc. but I'm not sure
>if the optical viewfinder (mirror + pentraprism) thing is really needed
>anymore. I personally would love to have a live preview with a swivel
>screen like the G series powershot cameras.
>
>Actually there's a version of the 20D called the 20Da, which has LCD
>live preview. It's basically a really expensive 20D optimised for low
>light photography. It's only available in Japan though.

Live preview would be nice, but it would definitely NOT replace the
reflex viewfinder for normal use. I have a camera with no optical
viewfinder, and it is much harder to see and compose images on it. This
may to some extent be a function of age; when you get to the point where
you can only focus on an LCD image at arm's length, then you appreciate
what an optical viewfinder does for you. Having both is IMO a prime
advantage of DSLRs.

As for the 20Da, (a) I understand from Canon's own literature that the
live preview is unsuitable for use in normal lighting (a crying shame
IMO) and (b) it is available outside Japan, but probably on special
order.

David
--
David Littlewood
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 11:45:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"David J Taylor"
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid> schreef
in bericht news:iKO_e.117705$G8.49901@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> westin@graphics.cornell.nospam.edu wrote:
>> Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:
>>
>>> It doesn't have the kind of mirror lock-up that I think Stephen is
>>> refering to. Yes with the custom function it can be instructed to
>>> flip the mirror up momentarily before taking the exposure, to
>>> minimise vibrations. However this wont help at all if you're using a
>>> lens which extends too far into the body. The mirror will still drop
>>> down again hitting the rear element of the lens.
>>>
>>>> The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...
>>
>> Yup, that's what I meant. Not "lock the mirror up for a few seconds to
>> reduce vibration", but "lock the mirror up and keep it there, because
>> I'm going to stick something in there that needs the space."
>
> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>
> David
>
May all your wishes come true.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/0506/05060701zigview_lcd.a...
Aad
Anonymous
September 29, 2005 11:45:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Aad wrote:
> "David J Taylor"
> <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.not-this-bit.nor-this-part.uk.invalid>
> schreef in bericht
> news:iKO_e.117705$G8.49901@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> westin@graphics.cornell.nospam.edu wrote:
>>> Eugene <nospamthanks@nospam.com> writes:
>>>
>>>> It doesn't have the kind of mirror lock-up that I think Stephen is
>>>> refering to. Yes with the custom function it can be instructed to
>>>> flip the mirror up momentarily before taking the exposure, to
>>>> minimise vibrations. However this wont help at all if you're using
>>>> a lens which extends too far into the body. The mirror will still
>>>> drop down again hitting the rear element of the lens.
>>>>
>>>>> The 20D has Mirror Lock Up...
>>>
>>> Yup, that's what I meant. Not "lock the mirror up for a few seconds
>>> to reduce vibration", but "lock the mirror up and keep it there,
>>> because I'm going to stick something in there that needs the space."
>>
>> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>>
>> David
>>
> May all your wishes come true.
> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0506/05060701zigview_lcd.a...
> Aad

Sadly, that does not work under the mirror lock-up required for the lens.

David
September 30, 2005 1:00:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Amen to that! I like being able to change lenses etc. but I'm not sure
if the optical viewfinder (mirror + pentraprism) thing is really needed
anymore. I personally would love to have a live preview with a swivel
screen like the G series powershot cameras.

Actually there's a version of the 20D called the 20Da, which has LCD
live preview. It's basically a really expensive 20D optimised for low
light photography. It's only available in Japan though.

>
>
> If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>
> David
>
>
Anonymous
September 30, 2005 1:00:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <dhghgu$fe$1@otis.netspace.net.au>, Eugene
<nospamthanks@nospam.com> wrote:

> Amen to that! I like being able to change lenses etc. but I'm not sure
> if the optical viewfinder (mirror + pentraprism) thing is really needed
> anymore. I personally would love to have a live preview with a swivel
> screen like the G series powershot cameras.

You children need to go back to your kiddie toys.
Anonymous
September 30, 2005 1:00:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <dhghgu$fe$1@otis.netspace.net.au>, Eugene
> <nospamthanks@nospam.com> wrote:
>
>> Amen to that! I like being able to change lenses etc. but I'm not
>> sure if the optical viewfinder (mirror + pentraprism) thing is
>> really needed anymore. I personally would love to have a live
>> preview with a swivel screen like the G series powershot cameras.
>
> You children need to go back to your kiddie toys.

You don't take many waist-level or overhead pictures, do you?

David
September 30, 2005 4:32:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>
> OK, you compose the image, lock the mirror up, and take the shot. How
> tough is that?

OK, now try composing a shot with the camera sitting on the ground. Or
perhaps try composing a shot where to get the best view you have to have
the camera right up against another wall. I've owned a G3 now for 2 and
a half years and I can tell you that there are lots of situations where
the swivel screen is a God send. It allows you to compose shots that
would be virtually impossible to manage with an SLR viewfinder.
Anonymous
September 30, 2005 4:32:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <dhgtu1$5pr$1@otis.netspace.net.au>, Eugene
<nospamthanks@nospam.com> wrote:

> OK, now try composing a shot with the camera sitting on the ground. Or
> perhaps try composing a shot where to get the best view you have to have
> the camera right up against another wall. I've owned a G3 now for 2 and
> a half years and I can tell you that there are lots of situations where
> the swivel screen is a God send. It allows you to compose shots that
> would be virtually impossible to manage with an SLR viewfinder.

In almost 40 years of doing photography, I've composed images in just
about every conceivable position imaginable. Always got along just fine
with a viewfinder.
September 30, 2005 4:43:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

If you had owned a G series powershot camera you would know what I mean,
but since you don't there's not really any point me trying to convince
you of the benefits.

By the way, my kiddie toys also include a 20D, an EOS 30, and an Olympus
OM-4. I can however get shots with my G3 that I couldn't possibly do
with any of my other cameras.

>
>
> You children need to go back to your kiddie toys.
September 30, 2005 4:53:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>
> I'm pretty sure they still make accessories for angle viewing with an
> SLR. Should fit DSLRs, too.
>
> Maybe, some day, some maker will get back to the early Canono F1
> concept of a slip off pentaprism. Slide it back, and get as low as you
> like, or hold it overhead to shot. I had that in '69, IIRC on the date.
> We've progressed right on past that, and the easy-to-change screens.
>

That would be fantastic. I think if the 20D had that ability I would
leave it off most of the time. I always liked being able to view the
ground glass directly from waist level when using medium format Mamiyas
and Hasselblads etc. I just find it easier to critically evaluate a
composition when I can use both eyes. The trouble might be that having
more things that detach would just add more places for dirt and stuff to
get into the camera body, and therefore onto the sensor.
September 30, 2005 12:07:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

>>>If only it then had live preview via the LCD as well...
>>>
>>>David
>>>
>>
>>May all your wishes come true.
>>http://www.dpreview.com/news/0506/05060701zigview_lcd.a...
>>Aad
>
>
> Sadly, that does not work under the mirror lock-up required for the lens.
>
> David
>
>

It's still a neat idea though.

It'd be nice if it could be rotated as well. It looks as though it's in
a fixed position. I wonder how bright it would be. It seems to me
there'd be a fair bit of light loss when the image is going through the
ground glass, then the pentaprism and then the viewfinder lens before
getting to the sensor. A sensor that could interchanged for the ground
glass screen would probably be the best idea.
!