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Gaming Rig $1000 good deal?

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February 7, 2013 4:25:38 PM

Hello,
I was planning on building a gaming rig for under $1000 when i came by this computer
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

The parts + Operation system would run about the same price from part picker. Also I wouldn't have to pay taxes on this computer which would save me about $80. What do you guys think is this a good deal. I wouldn't have to build one and the parts are nice
February 7, 2013 4:43:18 PM

I could never recommend a prebuilt. The problem with the computer listed is the video card. For 1000, you could get a much better system if gaming is your priority.

Use this as an outline of what you should be able to get for $1000:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/C2wZ
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February 7, 2013 4:56:50 PM

Yes the Video card is alot better on you part picker there but you forgot to add the operating system. Plus although probably not necessary the other unit runs I7 instead of I5. My question is Do you think its worth it if I didn't want to go through the hassle of building my own computer and is that the best I can get out there for that price.

I tried grabbing those same part spec from pcpicker and it's about the same price as the one from tiger direct pre-built.

again taxes would run me an extra 70+ buck which I wouldn't pay on that system from Tigerdirect
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February 7, 2013 5:02:06 PM

ya for a grand you can do better...that 7850 is going to choke that 3770 cpu at high rez.
The ssd is nice for boot speeds but the 500GB secondary is ***!
You'll fill that drive in the first 7 days..lol Games are larger these days and Steam...well that will kill a 500GB drive in no time...if you have lots of games on there.
Use partpicker to put a decent system together..people in here to help...JQ
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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
February 7, 2013 5:06:10 PM

Best Build I could come up with for the price including a OS

The pricing for the tigerdirect build is actually pretty decent but its unbalanced with too strong a cpu with a weak GPU. If you're willing to play on high 1080p the 7850 will do fine. It also seems to come with a mouse + keyboard set. It really depends on the resolution and you could CF the 7850 in the future (but might need to upgrade the PSU)

The 3570 is the same price as the 3470 while the 3570k is $20 more
The 3570 can OC to 4.2ghz on the z77 chipset using the turbo method
The 7870xt is quite a bit better gpu than the 7850
All parts are of good quality

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($49.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Sandisk 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($93.98 @ Mac Mall)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 XT 2GB Video Card ($244.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Gamma Classic (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.21 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $968.06
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-07 14:14 EST-0500)

With a more price/gb HDD

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Sandisk 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($93.98 @ Mac Mall)
Storage: Toshiba 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 XT 2GB Video Card ($244.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Gamma Classic (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.21 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1008.07
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-07 14:19 EST-0500)

Cheaper MB
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77-DS3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($104.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($49.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Sandisk 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($93.98 @ Mac Mall)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 XT 2GB Video Card ($244.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Gamma Classic (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.21 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $953.05
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-07 14:23 EST-0500)

Cheap MB with a larger HDD
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77-DS3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($104.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Sandisk 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($93.98 @ Mac Mall)
Storage: Toshiba 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 XT 2GB Video Card ($244.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Gamma Classic (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.21 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $993.06
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-07 14:24 EST-0500)
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February 7, 2013 5:19:37 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/C2PT

So I went to part picker and got the I5 instead of the I7 and barely saved anything.

I like that build by sticks there. I just figured it would save me some time from having to build one and get it build by someone in the know.

Alhought that 7950 is alot better I don't think I will need it yet since i play wow, diablo, Rift, GW2. Plus I can always upgrade the video card later if needs be. To order all those parts pay the extra tax and shipping.

Is it not better to have someone professional build it for you and then you can just upgrade later if needs be?

The only difference I see so far is the Video card. which would cost me and extra $100 total if I had to build it myself taking into account taxes/shipping. And the difference between 7850 and 7950 is about $100 bucks.

Maybe I'm just trying to avoid building it myself because I'm afraid of messing things up. :) 

So it's worth it except that its just unbalance because the GPU is weak. Mhmm. Thanks for the help everyone I'm gonna think about it.
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February 7, 2013 7:57:27 PM

You have to understand that for gaming the 3570k is the best you can get for performance and price. That 3770 will provide no benefit in game. I will say this because I actually have experience on the issue, these "professional builders" will always opt for cheaper parts to maximize their profits. For instance, the psu is listed a "500 watt". What that means is they will use one of their POS models that are terrible quality and have the chance of destroying your investment. Also, building a computer today is probably easier than a lot of LEGO kits, lol. There are tons of guides out there and there are many people on Tom's that will be glad to get you the most for your money. The build I listed is just something I threw together to show you what you should expect with your budget.
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February 19, 2013 2:57:52 PM

Best answer selected by see1976.
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