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Help! GTX 660Ti DirectCU OC not enough 4 pins

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 23, 2012 10:32:29 PM

So I've recently bought the above graphics card and I've had too remove the HDD cage to fit it in. Now I have connected one 6 pin to it (using a two 4 pin to 6 pin converter) but I now need a second six pin and I don't have two more 4 pins.
What needs to be done? Short of buying a new PCU
Thanks, please reply ASAP.
a c 114 U Graphics card
December 23, 2012 10:38:00 PM

What power supply is it. Most should at least have 1 6-pin pci-e connector(most have more).
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December 23, 2012 10:40:54 PM

It requires 2 6 pin pci-e's to run, if that's what you meant?
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December 23, 2012 10:50:43 PM

So is there any other option apart from the new PSU (thanks by the way) and I really don't have a lot of space left in the tower. Like I said before I had to remove the HDD cage just too fit my new graphics card, space could be a real problem.
Taking that into consideration is the new PSU you've mentioned above still the best option? (Preferably between $50 and $150)
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Best solution

a c 114 U Graphics card
December 23, 2012 10:58:33 PM

Yes the new power supply IS the best option. If your power supply does not have the needed cables, chances are it may not have enough power for the card.

That is what i was talking about. I was asking if the power supply at least had 1 6 pin connector.

Older power supplies used to have more 5 and 3.3 volt power, but modern systems use must more 12 volt power. because of this, an older power supply(even a higher wattage unit) may not work with a modern video card.

I had and old 380 watt power supply(Antec TruePower 380) with 18 amps(216 watts) on its 12 volt rail while a new 380(Antec Earthwatts 380) watt unit may have 27(324 watts).
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a b U Graphics card
December 23, 2012 11:00:35 PM

Well you don't have enough cables so you can't use your current PSU (and probably shouldn't with a GTX 660 Ti). You just need to replace the old PSU with the new one so it shouldn't take up extra space. That PSU is the best value for the quality that you need. You can always spend more for one with higher efficiency, more cables and modular cabling so you can put away cables you don't need.
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December 23, 2012 11:08:07 PM

Alright, thanks for that both of you, I appreciate it. Looks like a new power supply is the only way too go.
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December 23, 2012 11:08:37 PM

Best answer selected by GamerGG.
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a b U Graphics card
December 23, 2012 11:17:44 PM

You're welcome and enjoy your new upgrades.
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a b U Graphics card
December 23, 2012 11:47:43 PM


Crazy.

There are plenty of adapters that convert MOLEX to 6 pin. They take two molex (to reduct load on the connector) to get the +12V leads for the 6pin. $5 part. I've installed many of these upgrading OEM systems like HP, SONY. Older PSUs did not have 6-pins. Many video cards come with molex to 6-pin adapters included for this reason.

There are plenty of adapters that convert SATA power to 6 pin. Newer power supplies have more SATA power then molex so use this instead of molex if you have plenty of sata power adapters.

You need to post your PSU power output and brand. Both are on a sticker on the side of the power supply. Then people can tell you if your current power supply has enough juice. hint: "the official TDP of the GTX 660 Ti is 150W" http://www.anandtech.com/show/6159/the-geforce-gtx-660-... so you need a decent 350W power supply. A 300W supply is too close to the edge to work unless you have a very low power CPU.
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a c 114 U Graphics card
December 24, 2012 12:14:59 AM

@ tsnor

While you may be able to use adapters, the power supply still needs to have the extra power for the card. Chances are that power supply the OP has, due to its lack of cables(not even enough 4 pin molex) is likely too old to support the new card.

You know that my current 300(who would not want to run a gtx 650 to on one of those :)  Even that power supply has 1 6 pin pci-e cable) watt power supply has more power then an older 380 watt unit.

If the power supply is too old, I would avoid adapters and recommend all other users do. The exceptions are low tdp cards(lets say 90 and under since 75 will come from the board) and high powered power supplies from just before the release of PCI-e power connectors.

I see you listed FULL system power, but you also know that on older power(well technically all) supplies, only a percentage(A much lower amount then new ones) of the total sticker rating was on the 12 volt lines right.

For instance my old Antec Truepower 380s(single fan quiet one for the Sonata case) had 18 amps @ 12 volts. That was just 216 watts. If the cpu needs 95 and the card needs 150. I am so screwed(if they get to FULL load).

That does not include the board and whatnot. While not everything uses the 12 volt rail, the CPU and GPU do for sure.

So its not about wattage of the unit, but about how much wattage you can get on the 12 volt rail.

I hope this is usable info, I am NOT trying to put down what you say. Check out how much power power[12 volt] the EA380 has vs the old TP380s. Both are 380 watt rated units.
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a b U Graphics card
December 24, 2012 12:02:23 PM

nukemaster said:
@ tsnor

While you may be able to use adapters, the power supply still needs to have the extra power for the card. Chances are that power supply the OP has, due to its lack of cables(not even enough 4 pin molex) is likely too old to support the new card.

You know that my current 300(who would not want to run a gtx 650 to on one of those :)  Even that power supply has 1 6 pin pci-e cable) watt power supply has more power then an older 380 watt unit.

If the power supply is too old, I would avoid adapters and recommend all other users do. The exceptions are low tdp cards(lets say 90 and under since 75 will come from the board) and high powered power supplies from just before the release of PCI-e power connectors.

I see you listed FULL system power, but you also know that on older power(well technically all) supplies, only a percentage(A much lower amount then new ones) of the total sticker rating was on the 12 volt lines right.

For instance my old Antec Truepower 380s(single fan quiet one for the Sonata case) had 18 amps @ 12 volts. That was just 216 watts. If the cpu needs 95 and the card needs 150. I am so screwed(if they get to FULL load).

That does not include the board and whatnot. While not everything uses the 12 volt rail, the CPU and GPU do for sure.

So its not about wattage of the unit, but about how much wattage you can get on the 12 volt rail.

I hope this is usable info, I am NOT trying to put down what you say. Check out how much power power[12 volt] the EA380 has vs the old TP380s. Both are 380 watt rated units.


Actually we are in agreement. I said to use the output of the power supply, not the number of wires to see if a video card would work. I said post the model number so we could see if the PSU is crap. I posted 300W would not work. From your post I think you agreed with that. I agree with your reasoning that knowing amps on the +12V output is really what is needed.

It's no big deal if the OP buys a new power supply and may be a step up in stability if his old PSU is a marginal one. However if all he needs is some cables he can save some work and $$ by swapping the PSU. We should have verified its an ATX size PSU he needs, but his video card fit so most likely he needs an ATX power supply.
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