Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

I believe my Cat5e run is spliced

Tags:
  • Connection
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
Share
January 28, 2012 3:27:57 AM

Hello All,

This issue may not be for the faint-hearted.

I recently moved into a new home. The first thing I did was look how to wire my LAN.

I had an existing ring topography telephony run with Cat5e. So I figured I could hook RJ45 female jacks to the end of each line in each room because I did not need a telephone. This would leave me with 2 RJ45 jacks in each room with a telephone jack; One coming in, and the other leaving. For rooms I needed a LAN connection, I would use a switch. For rooms I did not need a connection, I simply connected the two jacks to continue the run.

Everything works perfect except for one strange run. I have one run that seems to go from my office then split to a bedroom and the living room. I have a network cable tester and it shows all pairs are connected correctly in all three places. I know this cannot be good as it must cause packets to collide.

When I hook up a pc to the connection, it will recognize that I plugged it in, but then it will close the connection.

Do you have any ideas on how to just kill one of the "splice" runs? I do not need it in the bedroom, but it would be nice in the living room. For a quick rundown of my environment:

- Internet comes into the office to the router to a switch.
- The switch has the: Internet In; Office PC; Out to bed 1; out to bed 2/living room (spliced connection)
- I have network connection in bed1 into a switch that has: In from office; Bed Pc: Out to Master Bed
- There is a patch connection in my pantry because there was a phone jack there for some reason. This connects Bed 1 and Master Bed through the pantry
- I have connection in Master Bed into a switch that has: In from bed1; MBed PC (This is the end of the run)

So, I believe my theory is correct, but there is something hiding in the wall that is screwing up the living room run. I do see that something was added "after-market" in the living room. That Cat5e wire is yellow where the rest of the house is blue. I am guessing that is where the hack took place.

I know this is clear as mud but in short I have a Cat5e that looks like a Y with connections in 3 rooms. How can I turn that Y into an I without ripping cables out of the wall? Any suggestions?

More about : cat5e run spliced

January 31, 2012 7:08:44 PM

I am sorry, but you should run a new cable. Otherwise, you MIGHT be able to find the splice and remove the other connections without too much loss in signal, but it is a gamble and you might end up with a connection that is intermittent or slow.
m
0
l
January 31, 2012 7:38:53 PM

PhilFrisbie said:
I am sorry, but you should run a new cable. Otherwise, you MIGHT be able to find the splice and remove the other connections without too much loss in signal, but it is a gamble and you might end up with a connection that is intermittent or slow.


Thanks for the reply. That is my plan in the future. I was just wondering if there was a workaround that didn't include cutting into walls that I just wasn't thinking of to make do for the time being. However, the more I think about it, the more I just want to rewire the house.

So, I think that is the only solution. Oh well, time to do some cutting :sol: 
m
0
l
Related resources
January 31, 2012 7:48:41 PM

If your house is a single story with a reasonable attic crawl space, you shouldn't have to cut up the walls to do a complete rewire. Just open all the existing jacks and drop lines down the wall.

Rather than some odd configuration like you have now, where you use RJ45 to RJ45 connectors or switches in each room, you can run a line for each jack to the central point where you can use a good switch and router for the whole network. While a big job, you can always temporize with wireless until you have the time and energy to do it right.
m
0
l
February 7, 2012 1:12:34 AM

RealBeast said:
If your house is a single story with a reasonable attic crawl space, you shouldn't have to cut up the walls to do a complete rewire. Just open all the existing jacks and drop lines down the wall.

Rather than some odd configuration like you have now, where you use RJ45 to RJ45 connectors or switches in each room, you can run a line for each jack to the central point where you can use a good switch and router for the whole network. While a big job, you can always temporize with wireless until you have the time and energy to do it right.



Hey beast,

I'm in Arizona with a flat roof and no attic, so the only option I have is destruction :whistle:  . I also have wireless, but even 802.11n lacks the bandwidth for full hd video from the media server. Thanks though!
m
0
l
February 7, 2012 11:24:53 AM

I figured that was the problem, nothing else really is adequate for bluray streaming.
m
0
l
!