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Recent build running really slowly.

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February 12, 2013 2:11:24 AM

I did a build for my brother who likes to do video editing. I've never had too much problems with any of my other builds besides a couple defective parts here and there(PSU, a few graphics cards, and a stick of RAM). But my brothers computer is just not running right, it takes way to long to boot and when it does nothing runs smoothly.
His specs are:
AMD fx 8120 cpu
GIGABYTE GA-970A-D3 AM3+ mobo
32gb ddr3 ram
Windows 7 Professional
Barracuda 1tb hd
Fx 6670 graphics card
600w psu
And once he restarts it, it runs much smoother.
Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Lukas
a b B Homebuilt system
February 12, 2013 2:50:22 AM

How fast is your hard drive? What do you mean nothing runs smoothly, examples?
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February 12, 2013 3:02:49 AM

7200rpm, Things don't load fast and programs take way to long to boot. I have the same hd in my system with no problems.
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Related resources
February 12, 2013 3:11:41 AM

The 600 watt PSU might be causing a power struggle between the GPu and the motherboard for resources so getting at leasst a 750 watt PSU might resolve that issue. The motherboard has a support power socket of 8 pins and I doubt that many 600 watt PSU's would have that connector, you do need to use the whole 8pins, using just four of the pin socket means that you are using the onboard graphics and not a video card.


Your link goes nowhere, try this one
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=...

32 gb of ram, is that like 4 x 8gb? The Memory support list only shows Samsung @1333mhz (Samsung 8GB M378B1G73AHO DS)


The graphics card is rather low end but good enough for most games, and AMD recommend a PSU of no less than 550 watts -
http://support.amd.com/us/certified/power-supplies/Page...
even though they listed 400 watts in their specifications list. I'd still go with at least a 750 watt PSU to save botlenecking the power.

The Graphics card requires a PCI Express 2.1 x16 bus interface however, the motherboard uses only 2.0 standard, if that really means anything.

So, what brand and model is your ram?
What brand name is your PSU?
Do you use a cooler or standard heatsink and fan?
Are you using the 8-pin connector for support power or just the 4 pin connector (located next to the CPU)? It might have a black capping on the other 4 connectors.

When you boot up, the psu draws all the total power out put is has to offer to fill the capacitors and then when you restart, the capacitors are virtually still partially filled and the boot up tops them up. The reason it runs poorly in the first place is that there is npt enough power to fill the capacitors and the motherboard struggles to allocate power.





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February 12, 2013 3:30:35 AM

TenPc said:
The 600 watt PSU might be causing a power struggle between the GPu and the motherboard for resources so getting at leasst a 750 watt PSU might resolve that issue. The motherboard has a support power socket of 8 pins and I doubt that many 600 watt PSU's would have that connector, you do need to use the whole 8pins, using just four of the pin socket means that you are using the onboard graphics and not a video card.


Your link goes nowhere, try this one
http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=...

32 gb of ram, is that like 4 x 8gb? The Memory support list only shows Samsung @1333mhz (Samsung 8GB M378B1G73AHO DS)


The graphics card is rather low end but good enough for most games, and AMD recommend a PSU of no less than 550 watts -
http://support.amd.com/us/certified/power-supplies/Page...
even though they listed 400 watts in their specifications list. I'd still go with at least a 750 watt PSU to save botlenecking the power.

The Graphics card requires a PCI Express 2.1 x16 bus interface however, the motherboard uses only 2.0 standard, if that really means anything.

So, what brand and model is your ram?
What brand name is your PSU?
Do you use a cooler or standard heatsink and fan?
Are you using the 8-pin connector for support power or just the 4 pin connector (located next to the CPU)? It might have a black capping on the other 4 connectors.

When you boot up, the psu draws all the total power out put is has to offer to fill the capacitors and then when you restart, the capacitors are virtually still partially filled and the boot up tops them up. The reason it runs poorly in the first place is that there is npt enough power to fill the capacitors and the motherboard struggles to allocate power.


So the power supply is a coolermaster, it was cheap and he ran out of budget. I'm using the 8 pin. Standard heat sink(looking to upgrade though) And the ram is a corsair XMS3, I've done some research and it may not be running at its full 1600 though so I'll be sure to check that.and the mobo is acttually http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=...
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