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Burning smell.

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February 12, 2013 1:17:28 PM

So, I bought components to build a basic PC, and today I built it, checked everything twice before turning it on.

My problem is, the first time I turned it on there was a strong burning smell, the computer booted up alright, HDD worked, DVD and Graphics Card, but still, there was a strong plastic burning smell.

I think the problem is I'm using a 250v power cable, and the PSU has a sticker with 220v, I can't find a 220v 3-pin power cable though :s.

I've read it's the grease in the PSU, but don't want to chance turning my computer back on a causing harm to any components.

Any help guys?

More about : burning smell

February 12, 2013 1:24:03 PM

It's not the cable that determines the voltage going to your psu, it's your AC outlet. If you're really in an area with 250v AC outlets, you should look into getting a good quality full-range (90v-264v) psu instead of one that only works with 220v.
February 12, 2013 1:26:04 PM

MauveCloud said:
It's not the cable that determines the voltage going to your psu, it's your AC outlet. If you're really in an area with 250v AC outlets, you should look into getting a good quality full-range (90v-264v) psu instead of one that only works with 220v.

So that rules out too much power, and the fact it powers on fine, sorta does.

What do you suggest I do? I can't afford another PSU (I was originally on a tight budget)
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February 12, 2013 1:30:18 PM

Is it a good power supply? Good quality with reasonable wattage for your build? If not, then you'll probably end frying your whole system. Usually a good quality power supply has it's own power switch on the back so you could unplug all the power leads to the motherboard and all your components and just run the power supply by itself for a while to make sure it is in fact just residue burning off. If it is a cheap power supply it probably won't have a power switch and I wouldn't trust it as far as I could throw it.
February 12, 2013 1:31:55 PM

warezme said:
Is it a good power supply? Good quality with reasonable wattage for your build? If not, then you'll probably end frying your whole system. Usually a good quality power supply has it's own power switch on the back so you could unplug all the power leads to the motherboard and all your components and just run the power supply by itself for a while to make sure it is in fact just residue burning off. If it is a cheap power supply it probably won't have a power switch and I wouldn't trust it as far as I could throw it.

It's a 500w PSU, has it's own dedicated power switch, I'll do what you said and unplug it all.
February 12, 2013 1:35:30 PM

Good quality psus shouldn't have residue in the grease to burn off. Burning plastic sounds more like insulation melting. Even top-quality psus like Corsair and Seasonic don't always list no-load operation, so you might need to connect one case fan and use the paperclip trick to turn it on.

It might help if you could specify the exact make and model of the psu.
February 12, 2013 1:35:35 PM

Where do you live that has 250v?
February 12, 2013 1:42:00 PM

MauveCloud said:
Good quality psus shouldn't have residue in the grease to burn off. Burning plastic sounds more like insulation melting. Even top-quality psus like Corsair and Seasonic don't always list no-load operation, so you might need to connect one case fan and use the paperclip trick to turn it on.

It might help if you could specify the exact make and model of the psu.

It's a cheap PSU (as I said, I was on a budget) It's a CiT 500CB.

If I do need a new PSU, can you recommend a cheap but reliable one?

Don't start judging me and say that's the problem lol.
February 12, 2013 1:53:13 PM

I wouldn't trust a psu when I can't find the company website. Raidmax psus have a bad reputation, but at least they have a website. I can't confirm that CiT even has that much. Like warezme said, a bad psu can ruin your entire system, which will end up costing you a lot more than just the psu. That makes it a very bad component to try to save money on.

If the rest of your system is all low-cost components, the Corsair CX430 should be enough, but without a complete list, I can't be certain.
February 12, 2013 1:54:18 PM

MauveCloud said:
I wouldn't trust a psu when I can't find the company website. Raidmax psus have a bad reputation, but at least they have a website. I can't confirm that CiT even has that much. Like warezme said, a bad psu can ruin your entire system, which will end up costing you a lot more than just the psu. That makes it a very bad component to try to save money on.

This paper clip test, I actually dont have a paper clip lol, will a bit of wire do?

Edit: wire worked, can't smell anything coming from the PSU :s
February 12, 2013 1:58:41 PM

MauveCloud said:
I wouldn't trust a psu when I can't find the company website. Raidmax psus have a bad reputation, but at least they have a website. I can't confirm that CiT even has that much. Like warezme said, a bad psu can ruin your entire system, which will end up costing you a lot more than just the psu. That makes it a very bad component to try to save money on.

If the rest of your system is all low-cost components, the Corsair CX430 should be enough, but without a complete list, I can't be certain.

i3-3220
HD 7750
MSI B75MA-E33 Intel B75
4GB Corsair RAM.
February 12, 2013 2:11:18 PM

Yeah, a Corsair CX430 would handle that. Not many cheaper psus (based on USA prices) that I can really recommend, but the Antec Neo Eco 400C would work.
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