Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

100% Rookie New Build.

Last response: in Systems
Share
February 14, 2013 7:26:53 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: No hurry, I've never built a computer in my life and I really have limited knowledge of all this stuff.

Budget Range: Whatever it takes to build the best gaming rig.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, surfing the internet, watching movies and all the other misc. stuff everyone that has a computer does.

Are you buying a monitor: No.

Parts to Upgrade: None.

Do you need to buy OS: Yes.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: None.

Location: California, USA

Parts Preferences: None.

Overclocking: Absolutely! I plan on pushing this sum bitch to the limit! So, I'm going to need a really high end cooler.

Sound Card: Yes, something that can really compliment a good home theater system.

SLI or Crossfire: Probably later on down the line but not now.

Your Monitor Resolution: It would have to be 1920x1080 or higher.

Media Card Reader: I'd say I would like to have one, though it isn't necessary.

Additional Comments: I don't care about looks or how quiet it is, I'm just interested in being able to play any game out now and in the foreseeable future with settings maxed out. I do understand that More $ doesn't necessarily mean better gaming performance, but I'd also like to add that I'm not shying away from the more expensive stuff because of a limited budget. I've seen stuff like Additional Case Fans, system cooling, memory cooling, hard drive cooling, liquid cooled graphics cards, Fan Controllers, offered by some custom builders but is that really needed? I suppose it would very in a case by case basis.

In summation, just have some fun throwing out opinions, I'm willing to hear from the most thrifty examples to the more serious performance driven suggestions. As long as the end result is a monster of a gaming rig I'm cool with it.

More about : 100 rookie build

Best solution

February 14, 2013 7:41:04 PM

Balls-out performance rig:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($192.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE 90 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1983.73
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-14 16:49 EST-0500)

$1500 mid range rig:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($60.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($121.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($103.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1391.86
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-14 16:38 EST-0500)

$1K budget rig:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($295.66 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($92.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($70.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1014.55
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-14 16:40 EST-0500)

$800 budget rig:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7850 2GB Video Card ($188.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $796.45
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-14 16:44 EST-0500)

I don't include monitor, keyboard, or mouse in the builds as that's entirely personal preference. Also you will need a Windows license with any build you go with.
Share
February 14, 2013 7:46:19 PM

That was fast. Thanks a lot :)  Do you think I would be able to get that 3570k up to a stable 4.8 - 5.0?
m
0
l
Related resources
February 14, 2013 7:52:23 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($137.00 @ Adorama)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.67 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($98.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS72 DVD/CD Writer ($18.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1365.04
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-14 16:52 EST-0500)
m
0
l
February 14, 2013 7:52:45 PM

htfcm said:
That was fast. Thanks a lot :)  Do you think I would be able to get that 3570k up to a stable 4.8 - 5.0?


Depends on what cooler you use. A 212 Evo will achieve 3.8 - 4.2GHz. A Noctua NH-U9B or Cooler Master Hyper 612 will achieve 4.2 - 4.5 GHz, the D14 will achieve 4.8 - 5.0GHz, anything over that you will need liquid cooling.
m
0
l
February 14, 2013 8:12:51 PM

htfcm said:
Do you think I should use liquid cooling if I keep it at 5.0GHz to make sure it's stable while it's being worked? If so, what do you think of the 'Zalman Ultimate Luquid Cooler' http://pcpartpicker.com/part/zalman-cpu-cooler-cnps20lq ?


Closed loops like that won't be any better than the D14. The D14 is pretty much the reigning king of heat sinks and it can take on pretty much anything you're thinking of getting.
m
0
l
February 14, 2013 8:24:45 PM

Okay, sounds good.
m
0
l
February 14, 2013 8:56:14 PM

Ah, okay, this is what I'll probably need. Thx :D 
m
0
l
February 14, 2013 10:37:05 PM

Why does anyone want to get to 5.0ghz??

It doesn't improve performance much.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 12:48:01 AM

I'd recommend open loop watercooling if you're planning on oc'ing to 5.0ghz. Purely because it seems like you dont have a set budget, watercooling will make it easier on your CPU, lower temps, longer life. Although if you're that new to building computers it may be very daunting for you to approach custom watercooling.

The swiftech g-unit recommended would be ok, but it wouldn't be comparible to a open loop XSPC loop.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 1:01:33 AM

I think I will end up going that route, either that or possibly get a 2600k or 2700k and OC the hell out of that. I hear they OC better since they don't heat up as fast.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 3:12:30 AM

htfcm said:
I think I will end up going that route, either that or possibly get a 2600k or 2700k and OC the hell out of that. I hear they OC better since they don't heat up as fast.


That's only when you switch the voltages and that will happen with every CPU on the market, it's not only limited to Ivy Bridge. There's no reason to spend that kind of money on a CPU that's already a couple of generations old now.

Quote:
The swiftech g-unit recommended would be ok, but it wouldn't be comparible to a open loop XSPC loop.


That's true but it's a good middle of the road unit between a closed water block and full on open loops.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 8:02:37 PM

g-unit1111 said:
That's only when you switch the voltages and that will happen with every CPU on the market, it's not only limited to Ivy Bridge. There's no reason to spend that kind of money on a CPU that's already a couple of generations old now.

Quote:
The swiftech g-unit recommended would be ok, but it wouldn't be comparible to a open loop XSPC loop.


That's true but it's a good middle of the road unit between a closed water block and full on open loops.



Yeah, I believe you're right. I'm 100% set on the i5, thank you.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 8:21:34 PM

byogamingpc said:
Here is an easy link to buy a nice rig all at once. It also allows for expansion if you want to add another GPU to crossfire later.

http://goo.gl/aOQ7G



Thanks, I agree with 16 GB over 8. I was originally going to go with 8 but I usually tend to want to overkill so I'm going with 16.
m
0
l
February 15, 2013 9:10:33 PM

htfcm said:
Thanks, I agree with 16 GB over 8. I was originally going to go with 8 but I usually tend to want to overkill so I'm going with 16.


Honestly RAM isn't the place to spend tons of money on a build. If you want to I'd suggest putting that money toward a 256GB SSD over a 128GB.
m
0
l
!