Solved

AGP Video card questions

Hello,
I am currently trying to upgrade the video card on a Dell Dimension 8300 that is 9 years old. Believe it or not, it's STILL an awesome machine. My issue is when playing video from the HD or DVD, when the camera moves fast, I get a horizontal line across the middle of the picture that offsets the top and bottom halves by 5 or 10 pixels. Not terrible, but a pain in the butt.

Currently, I have an AGP 128MB NVidia GeForce 5200 card (DDR). I think I've figured out that the DDR on the motherboard doesn't matter to the video card at all; that is, just because I have DDR for my RAM doesn't mean that I can't have DDR2 and up for my video card.
My main question (assuming I'm right so far) is "Why do some AGP DDR2 cards have 3 sections and some have 2 in the gold part you plug in? I've been on Newegg and TigerDirect looking around, and can't seem to see a difference in the names or descriptions, except the pictures show either 2 or 3 plugs.
Any ideas? Anything work better than any other?
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about video card questions
  1. I am currently using an AGP card on an old MSI board, so I get you.

    MSI K9MM-V
    Athlon X2 6000 3.0GHZ
    Radeon HD 4650 1 GB AGP
    4gb DDR2 800

    The reason that some cards have two device outputs and some have three is that the card is designed to put out more than two types of outputs. Most AGP cards have DVI, VGA and component (RGB) outputs. Some of the last series have HDMI, DVI and VGA. But none that I know of could support three monitors simultaneously, unless two of them where mirrored (showing the same output).

    The type of memory and amount that card has dictates how fast it is. A card with DDR5 is much faster than a card with DDR3, or DDR2.

    I have a HD4650 that has supports DVI, VGA and HDMI. You are going to have a time buying a new AGP card. They are not made any more so any card you get will be second hand. Might be easier to upgrade to a new motherboard and CPU.

    I realize that sounds strange since I have a system that is similar to yours, but I am putting a new system together now and was just postponing upgrade to fund other more important issues. But I will not be putting any more money into an obsolete motherboard CPU system.
  2. newegg still sells new AGP cards. this one will be your best option as all the other ones are about as powerful as your current card:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161337
  3. Best answer
    rpwilso, are you asking about the carded edge (the part that plugs into the motherboard)?

    If so, the difference is in the voltage that the card supports. The Wikipedia article on AGP should explain it.

    Casey
  4. cklaubur said:
    rpwilso, are you asking about the carded edge (the part that plugs into the motherboard)?

    If so, the difference is in the voltage that the card supports. The Wikipedia article on AGP should explain it.

    Casey


    I am. My card, a 5200 as mentioned above, has the 2 slots (apparently 3.3v and 1.5v). So if I read it properly, only the 1.5v is used and if the 3.3v is missing from a new card, it doesn't matter as long as my mobo doesn't use 3.3v. Correct?

    And the fact that regularguy290 pointed me to a DDR3 to replace a DDR is of no significance other than it is a faster card? No detrimental effects?
  5. Correct. What card you can use is dependent upon your motherboard's AGP slot set up. As long as your motherboard does not require a 3.3v (AGP 1x or 2x), you should be good to go with any AGP 4x/8x graphics card (assuming your power supply is up to the task).

    Personally, I'd probably look at this HIS Radeon HD4350.

    -Wolf sends
  6. The memory type on the video card does not have to match the memory type on the motherboard. Otherwise, those of us with GDDR5 on our cards are going to have problems! :lol:

    The higher memory type (DDR3 compared to DDR in your example) is just faster memory. It gives the GPU a higher bandwidth, and allows it to work faster.

    Just make sure that whatever card you pick matches the slot on the motherboard and you should be alright.

    Casey
  7. Best answer selected by rpwilso.
Ask a new question

Read More

Graphics Cards DDR Graphics Product