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Card for a 250W PSU?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 2, 2013 9:55:38 PM

I have had this old hunk of a PC (HP Pavilion Desktop ~09'-10') for years now and I REALLY cant stand how slow it is! I think that it would be too much of a hassle to buy a new CPU and mobo for a prebuilt. I dont have the money right now to build a new system, but have a decent $150-$200 to replace the GPU. Currently I have a (don't laugh) GT 220, which I bought a few years back just to have the shader 3 requirements to play Arma 2. Any suggestions on the highest grade card I can get with the power restriction? Also, getting a new PSU is also out of the question because I understand how to put a PC together, but I dont feel confident on taking apart my current one aside from the GPU, since you only need the PCI Express slot and some power cables :p 

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: Within a few weeks, hopefully.

USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: Just gaming and watching YouTube, basic internet surfing.

CURRENT GPU AND POWER SUPPLY: NVIDIA GT 220, Some default HP 250W.

OTHER RELEVANT SYSTEM SPECS: Intel Pentium E5300, dont know mobo, 8GB in 4x2GB sticks.

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: Newegg, or maybe Amazon.

PARTS PREFERENCES: Don't really care, whatever works and/or performs better.

OVERCLOCKING: No, probably not with the power restrictions, and SLI/Xfire is a definite no.

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1920x1080.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Above paragraph.

More about : card 250w psu

a c 132 U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 10:25:54 PM

honestly I would try another method have you ever thought about maybe getting a SSD instead. Obviously you aren't gaming to heavily and with a 250 W PSU the only thing I really could recommend would be a 7750 perhaps but even though it requires a 450w minimum. You could try a nvidia 610 which only require 300 watts =\
a b U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 10:27:29 PM

hd7750 or gt640.The AMD is available in a low profile version if you have a small form factor pc. I don't beleive the nvidia is.
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January 2, 2013 10:33:36 PM

Huh, i had expected some better cards for my situation. But I guess a 7750 since all I see is saying the GT 640 is inferior. Any particular manufacturer to be preferred?
January 2, 2013 10:35:37 PM

bigshootr8 said:
honestly I would try another method have you ever thought about maybe getting a SSD instead. Obviously you aren't gaming to heavily and with a 250 W PSU the only thing I really could recommend would be a 7750 perhaps but even though it requires a 450w minimum. You could try a nvidia 610 which only require 300 watts =\



Don't see how a SSD would improve my gaming performance, it is definitely the card that is lacking. Not saying it is a great CPU, but I think the Pentium isnt the problem. And when a card "requires" a minimum wattage, does it just plain not boot if it does not detect a 450W PSU? Or is it just a sort of safe limit?
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 10:43:16 PM

Was only suggesting a SSD for the fact that it would make your system a bit more snappy. A 7750 requires a min. of 400 watts and the 7770 is higher. A 630 requires 400 watts as well. It's very hard to suggest any video card at the moment as his power supply is insufficient for anything.
January 2, 2013 10:46:54 PM

bigshootr8 said:
Was only suggesting a SSD for the fact that it would make your system a bit more snappy. A 7750 requires a min. of 400 watts and the 7770 is higher. A 630 requires 400 watts as well. It's very hard to suggest any video card at the moment as his power supply is insufficient for anything.


Funny thing is my GT220 requires 300W, yet runs fine on my 250W PSU. I am thinking about a new PSU, but im just too unsure of my ability to do it correctly :/ 
a b U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 10:50:38 PM

It sort of safe limit, it always above actuall power usage for whole system (considering large variety of system)

if the power is not adequate, usually BSOD / sudden off when gaming (peak power draw) or in bad/low quality PSU they just blow up.. (this bad for all component)

One thing is are the mobo had 4p +12v auxilary power (usually near the processor) ?
most pci-ex bus/slot on mobo feed power using those....
a c 355 U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 10:54:53 PM

250w PSU?

I wouldn't recommend anything beyond the Radeon HD 6570. The Radeon HD 7750 does not really consume a lot of power on the +12v rail considering the performance you are getting. Then again, a 250w PSU does not have much power to offer on the +12v rail to begin with.
January 2, 2013 10:56:31 PM

Like I said before, I can upgrade the PSU if needed (which it is), but I'm just not sure if this will work. This PSU is one with wires built into the unit, which outlaws the option of just simply plugging the old wires into the new PSU. If someone can give me some confidence I will try and replace the PSU. I would pay some place like best buy to do it, but they charge CRAZY rates that I don't have the money for, if I am going to be getting decent hardware.
a c 355 U Graphics card
January 2, 2013 11:02:49 PM

For a Radeon HD 7750 I would recommend at least a 300w PSU.

As PSU age they tend to become less efficient and provide less power than new. Mostly due to the aging capacitors. How much do you loose, not really sure. High quality PSUs tends to use high quality parts so generally the theory is that they would loose less output over time compared to average quality CPUs.

PC builders tend to use average quality PSUs. I know Dell gets their PSU's from manufacturers known for at least average quality PSU and Dell tends to underrate their PSUs slightly so their PSUs can actually output a little more (maybe 15w - 25w) more than what the specs actually claims. However, you have a HP not a Dell...
January 2, 2013 11:07:58 PM

jaguarskx said:
For a Radeon HD 7750 I would recommend at least a 300w PSU.

As PSU age they tend to become less efficient and provide less power than new. Mostly due to the aging capacitors. How much do you loose, not really sure. High quality PSUs tends to use high quality parts so generally the theory is that they would loose less output over time compared to average quality CPUs.

PC builders tend to use average quality PSUs. I know Dell gets their PSU's from manufacturers known for at least average quality PSU and Dell tends to underrate their PSUs slightly so their PSUs can actually output a little more (maybe 15w - 25w) more than what the specs actually claims. However, you have a HP not a Dell...


I was only considering the 7750 IF i stayed with my current PSU, but unless you can give me a reason that prevents me from replacing my current PSU, I will probably bump that GPU up to something like a low end GTX 500 series or whatever is best under $200.
January 3, 2013 12:08:00 AM

If your not sporting enough power you gpu should scale as to compensate. as is the case with the computer at my school that use 480's on boot in windows it says it has to scale performance do to a lack of power
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 3, 2013 1:32:21 AM

If you were to upgrade your power supply to something comparable what is the budget you would have on a graphics card.
January 3, 2013 1:47:40 AM

Poltregeist said:
Like I said before, I can upgrade the PSU if needed (which it is), but I'm just not sure if this will work. This PSU is one with wires built into the unit, which outlaws the option of just simply plugging the old wires into the new PSU. If someone can give me some confidence I will try and replace the PSU. I would pay some place like best buy to do it, but they charge CRAZY rates that I don't have the money for, if I am going to be getting decent hardware.



watch youtube videos how to do it, there might even be one with your specific HP pc.

it's what i recommend beginners use and to check with somebody on technical details before buying anything to make sure it's all going to work together.
January 3, 2013 1:51:20 AM

bigshootr8 said:
If you were to upgrade your power supply to something comparable what is the budget you would have on a graphics card.
0

I would probably go to $200 for a GPU, and maybe anywhere from $50-$100 for a decent PSU.
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 3, 2013 5:23:05 AM

yea I think that is a good range for both. You would be good with happy medium probably 75-80 dollars on the psu and 200 on the gpu is realistic. Probably could get you a gtx660 pretty soon here.
January 3, 2013 8:31:00 AM

So I think I can find a decent PSU, but what about GPU? Im looking at all different series and manufacturers and there is a LOT more in this $100-$200 category then what I have been eying at $200-$400. Some options I have seen are the 6870, 7770, GTX 560, a little more but the GTX 660, and others. I am hoping to keep the GPU under $200 though. I don't want to go insane since I may build a new PC within a year, and can just use a better card in that, or Xfire/SLI whatever I get.
January 3, 2013 3:34:01 PM

Thabks for the info! I know that you rarely find a 660 under 200, but you can easily get 1GB 7850s under that, and sometimes 2GB.
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 3, 2013 5:26:29 PM

That 7850 link is to the 2 gigabyte version of the cards I figure if you are getting a decent card now days doesn't to to be prepared for games that go over 1 gig of ram.
January 3, 2013 6:27:20 PM

bigshootr8 said:
That 7850 link is to the 2 gigabyte version of the cards I figure if you are getting a decent card now days doesn't to to be prepared for games that go over 1 gig of ram.


What do you think of the GTX 650 Ti? I am finding very nice offers ($180 and below) for it. AND the max power of the 650 Ti is 110W, which isn't much I think for my current 250W PSU. I mean my CPU only takes up (from specs) 65W if you are killing it in Metro 2033 or something, which is a game I do not play :p  I know you will probably just resuggest the 7850, but this is 2GB and a little cheaper, along with most likely working with my current PSU.
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 3, 2013 6:44:13 PM

The only issue I take with not replacing your current power supply is that normally manufactures HP, DELL, GATEWAY, I'm sure even Apple does this shenanigans they place cheap power supplies that are just enough to run what you have. I have a feeling the reliability is next to shot with the power supplies. When you think about it your CPU uses anywhere between 90-140 watts toss a graphic card in there you are really pushing things with a 650Ti. If you are going out and purchasing a graphics card you should be responsible for properly supplying enough wattage/amps running your power supply out on 100 percent usage is not a good way to run something happens to your psu and it can take out several critical parts of your computer you never EVVVVVER skimp on a power supply.
January 3, 2013 6:51:01 PM

bigshootr8 said:
The only issue I take with not replacing your current power supply is that normally manufactures HP, DELL, GATEWAY, I'm sure even Apple does this shenanigans they place cheap power supplies that are just enough to run what you have. I have a feeling the reliability is next to shot with the power supplies. When you think about it your CPU uses anywhere between 90-140 watts toss a graphic card in there you are really pushing things with a 650Ti. If you are going out and purchasing a graphics card you should be responsible for properly supplying enough wattage/amps running your power supply out on 100 percent usage is not a good way to run something happens to your psu and it can take out several critical parts of your computer you never EVVVVVER skimp on a power supply.


I understand this, but my CPU only draws 65W maximum. So that's 185W left for everything else, and what other hardware takes up significant power? The 650 Ti's max TDP is 110W, so thats 75W left.
a c 132 U Graphics card
January 3, 2013 6:55:17 PM

Right but you have other power draws optical drives, hard drives, power taken by heat. The issue is you get dumpster diving power supplies with these computers you buy in the store they aren't designed for you to power up dedicated graphic cards. Sure you can give it a go but dismissing the fact may prove to be a problem for you going forward. Like I said going cheap on a power supply or not buying one at all could take out more then the investment on the graphics card you are after.
January 3, 2013 11:20:15 PM

bigshootr8 said:
Right but you have other power draws optical drives, hard drives, power taken by heat. The issue is you get dumpster diving power supplies with these computers you buy in the store they aren't designed for you to power up dedicated graphic cards. Sure you can give it a go but dismissing the fact may prove to be a problem for you going forward. Like I said going cheap on a power supply or not buying one at all could take out more then the investment on the graphics card you are after.


True, I don't mind paying $50 for a PSU, its just the fact of installation that is putting me off. I am just unsure IF a non-HP power supply will even fit in the mounts, since its a top mounted PSU. I have heard companies like HP, Dell, and others make certain parts so that only theirs fit, making consumers come back to them if anything goes awry and charging premium price for the replacements.
January 11, 2013 12:07:45 AM

I have contacted HP support on the issue above, and they confirmed that the mounts are standard. So long as you don't plan on putting in a crazy wattage, extended length PSU you should be fine. I have decided on the Corsair CX500 for a PSU, and a NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti for a GPU. If anyone has suggestions in GPU for a similar price range (no 7850s plz, I can only find 1GB versions for that price), I am open for change.
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