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Advice on $3,000+ Office/Productivity/PhotoShop

Last response: in Systems
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February 19, 2013 7:57:45 PM

I have recently been asked by my boss to build a few systems for our office, probably three to five systems.
The budget is $1750 for each PC, and $1500 for monitors for each PC.
The systems will be used for a wide variety of activities and programs, and need to be quite powerful.
I have also been instructed to leave room for upgrade-ability in each system, so that in a few years we can boost them again and get another few years use out of them.

What I have spec'd (from NewEgg.com) is as follows:
(I have other parts besides those listed, such as the Case and Media Drives, etc... but those are pretty straight-forward, or are personal-preference by my boss.
I know to make sure that they support the physical requirements of the parts contained within.)

Motherboard- ASRock Z77 Extreme3 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Processor- Intel Core i7-3770S Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 65W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000
RAM- G.SKILL Value 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory
Video Card- 6-Mini DisplayPort PowerColor AX7870 2GBD5-6D Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX
SSD- Intel 335 Series Jay Crest SSDSC2CT240A4K5 2.5" 240GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
HDD- Western Digital WD Green WD20EZRX 2TB IntelliPower SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
PSU- COUGAR COUGAR-GX1050 1050W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Flexible Cable Management
Monitors- 5x ASUS VE278Q Black 27" Full HD HDMI LED Backlight LCD Monitor w/Speakers

I just wanted to check to see if anyone could see any holes in this build that I may not have noticed.
The idea is to buy another GPU and two more 8GB RAM sticks when the time to upgrade rolls around.
Also, if anyone knows of a good place to buy a good mount for monitors (5 or 6, stand preferably; not 100% sure if a wall-mount will work for everyone, so it's easier to just use a stand, to be safe) please feel free to suggest them to me.
Also, I have factored into the budget the necessary cables (such as 5 DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort adapters) and power strips/surge protectors to ensure everything will work together.
I feel very confident in this build and my abilities, I just wanted confirmation, basically, from anyone who might notice something I didn't catch.
As far as building the actual systems goes, I've built several and will have no problem there. Just wanted to get everything 110% 'squared-away' before we drop $9,000 to $15,000 on these computers.

Thanks!
February 19, 2013 8:22:53 PM

Quote:
I have also been instructed to leave room for upgrade-ability in each system, so that in a few years we can boost them again and get another few years use out of them.


Upgrading is kind of debatable - no matter what motherboard and CPU you go with something better will come around.

Quote:
I just wanted to check to see if anyone could see any holes in this build that I may not have noticed.


Actually I think I would drop that whole build and go with an X79 - this is where you will benefit from it. You won't benefit from a low power i7. Also I had an Intel SSD and had nothing but problems. That PSU is major overkill and is not from a generally reliable brand.

Quote:
Also, I have factored into the budget the necessary cables (such as 5 DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort adapters) and power strips/surge protectors to ensure everything will work together.


I generally advise not to include accessories in your budget. Things like the DP plugs you can get from a website called Monoprice.com for less than $2 a cable, and surge bars you can pick up from any Home Depot for like $5. If you need anything more than that consider getting something like an APC battery backup unit.

Here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($569.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($205.50 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($147.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($144.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($74.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Other: AMD FirePro W600 ($519.99)
Total: $1995.38
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-19 17:22 EST-0500)

The video card I linked to is capable of supporting 5 x displays off a single card through a variety of inputs configured in DP: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
February 19, 2013 8:32:01 PM

What are the pro's/con's between the 2GB VRAM GDDR5 FirePro and the 2GB VRAM GDDR5 7870?
Related resources
February 19, 2013 8:51:36 PM

If I may ask, is your business relying heavily on Photoshop? If its a business that holds a lot of client data, I imagine getting a HDD that access client very quickly and the WD green/blue drives aren't very quick. Although, I do think it's a good idea to have a green drive as a backup for any important data (or the whole PC) aside from the media drives you mentioned.
February 19, 2013 9:01:26 PM

WhiteWelcomer said:
What are the pro's/con's between the 2GB VRAM GDDR5 FirePro and the 2GB VRAM GDDR5 7870?


The Fire Pro allows for finer redraws where the 7870 is a faster card for gaming applications. If Photoshop / CS5 / CS6 is what you're going after you should definitely research this card further and see if it fits your needs.

Quote:
If I may ask, is your business relying heavily on Photoshop? If its a business that holds a lot of client data, I imagine getting a HDD that access client very quickly and the WD green/blue drives aren't very quick. Although, I do think it's a good idea to have a green drive as a backup for any important data (or the whole PC) aside from the media drives you mentioned.


The Blue drives are 7200 RPM, they're fine. The Green hard drives are 5400 RPM and very slow. But if you have a fast SSD as your primary the speed of your second, third, fourth, fifth, etc drives don't matter.
!