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Help with Fans

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February 20, 2013 1:27:25 AM

Well I got my new case today, and the rest of my parts are slated to arrive tomorrow. I've read, re-read and considered all of my options as far as airflow in my new case, and I know I want to maintain a positive pressure inside because I have indoor pets.

My question is this:

How would you set up the fans in the given configuration.

Fractal Design, Define R4 Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Comes with 2x 140mm 52 cfm fans (at 7 volts)

3x 140mm Cougar Vortex Hydro-dynamic bearing 58cfm (7 volts) extra case fans.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Thermaltake BlackWidow PSU (I will probably face this down to pull cool air from outside the case, and of course, it will exhaust out the back.

In the event you dont want to view the link on the case the fan placement options are as follows:

2x Front 120 or 140mm slots
1x Bottom 120 or 140 mm slot
1x Rear plate 140 mm slot
2x Top 120 or 140 mm slots
1x Side Panel 120 or 140 mm slot


Please tell me where you would place the 5 given fans and why.

More about : fans

February 20, 2013 1:28:26 AM

Also I'm not overly concerned about temperatures as I dont plan on over clocking at this time.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 20, 2013 1:32:19 AM

Front= intake
Back= exhaust
side=intake
Bottom= intake
top= exhaust


....because that's correct.


If you don't overclock, you only will need one fan in the front(intake) and one in the back(exhaust). The rest would just make noise and waste power.
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February 20, 2013 1:33:55 AM

I usually have the back case with a fan that takes air in, and the top pushing air out/ I like doing this because hot air rise to the top so by having a fan that push air out on top, i can get rid of the hot air.
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February 20, 2013 1:34:45 AM

tiny voices said:
Front= intake
Back= exhaust
side=intake
Bottom= intake
top= exhaust


....because that's correct.


If you don't overclock, you only will need one fan in the front(intake) and one in the back(exhaust). The rest would just make noise and waste power.



Let me ask you this... would you use the 2 Fractal design fans (the lower cfm fans) for the exhaust fans then?
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 20, 2013 1:36:40 AM

pete123edgar said:
I usually have the back case with a fan that takes air in, and the top pushing air out/ I like doing this because hot air rise to the top so by having a fan that push air out on top, i can get rid of the hot air.


Rear fans should always be exhaust. That's a fact.

usmarine1979 said:
Let me ask you this... would you use the 2 Fractal design fans (the lower cfm fans) for the exhaust fans then?


It honestly doesn't matter.
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February 20, 2013 1:36:59 AM

pete123edgar said:
I usually have the back case with a fan that takes air in, and the top pushing air out/ I like doing this because hot air rise to the top so by having a fan that push air out on top, i can get rid of the hot air.



Although many cases vary (wildly) I've done some research and found that my case will create better flow from front to back/top


My main objective is to create the optimal vortex or cyclone effect inside the case while maintaining positive pressure. Feeding air in from the back and out the top, while also feeding it in from the front would be destructive to the vortex concept
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February 20, 2013 1:37:04 AM

pete123edgar said:
I usually have the back case with a fan that takes air in, and the top pushing air out/ I like doing this because hot air rise to the top so by having a fan that push air out on top, i can get rid of the hot air.



Although many cases vary (wildly) I've done some research and found that my case will create better flow from front to back/top


My main objective is to create the optimal vortex or cyclone effect inside the case while maintaining positive pressure. Feeding air in from the back and out the top, while also feeding it in from the front would be destructive to the vortex concept
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February 20, 2013 1:37:09 AM

pete123edgar said:
I usually have the back case with a fan that takes air in, and the top pushing air out/ I like doing this because hot air rise to the top so by having a fan that push air out on top, i can get rid of the hot air.



Although many cases vary (wildly) I've done some research and found that my case will create better flow from front to back/top


My main objective is to create the optimal vortex or cyclone effect inside the case while maintaining positive pressure. Feeding air in from the back and out the top, while also feeding it in from the front would be destructive to the vortex concept
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 20, 2013 1:37:53 AM

If you aren't overclocking, none of this matters. one front intake and one rear exhaust fan will keep everything cool no problem. No point to fuss with all this and make your case sound like a leaf blower.
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February 20, 2013 1:38:06 AM

ok, weird site failures... sorry for the spam
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February 20, 2013 1:41:53 AM

tiny voices said:
If you aren't overclocking, none of this matters. one front intake and one rear exhaust fan will keep everything cool no problem. No point to fuss with all this and make your case sound like a leaf blower.



Yeah I learned my lesson about cooling with my last build. At this point, I've invested in a noise dampening case, and very low dB fans in case I run into an issue like I did previously (I purchased an Nvidia gtx 465 when they first came out and have dealt with 200+ degree F gpu temps ever since).

Personally I'd rather err on the safe side, as there may come a point when I do decide to overclock.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 20, 2013 1:43:50 AM

Put the fans in the orientation I listed above and you will be set.
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February 20, 2013 1:45:37 AM

Thanks Tiny I appreciate your input!
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 20, 2013 1:46:51 AM

Anytime! Always glad to help.
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!