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GPU, Fps & Screen resolution

Tags:
  • Graphics Cards
  • Screen Resolution
  • Resolution
  • FPS
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 5, 2013 3:35:31 AM

I'm having a hard time understanding this to be honest. Can someone help me out with these issues, my questions are: For starters I am looking to get a minimum to 65-70 Fps on a high resolution screen with EVERY game.

I think I understand that pixels are length x height... right ?????
and this matter how big your screen is, with the amount of pixels in that area???

Also I think I understand that your Fps depends on your GPU?

I'm pretty sure that these are very high Fps I'm trying to achieve but I'm not sure. I have seen some videos on yt saying that they are between 180-200+ Fps, what makes this possible?

I want to get a high resolution monitor so from what I've been reading on wiki. I can transfer this kind of resolution through an hdmi or a dvi because this is basically just a transfer cable right? Or is hdmi only capable of transferring a max resolution of 1080p? I'm so confused??????

Does the p in 1080p stand for pixels?

I've tried looking on this site for this information but yielded nothing.

Not looking for a hand out here but if someone can post some links to help me better understand these factors this would be great

I apologize for these completely ridiculous gestions
Thanks much T41CK





More about : gpu fps screen resolution

January 5, 2013 3:57:08 AM

1080p means 1920x1080.

at least an oc ati 7870 or gts 580 can give you your desire fps rate at that resolution.
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a b U Graphics card
January 5, 2013 3:59:02 AM

Quote:
I think I understand that pixels are length x height... right ?????


Yes.

Quote:
and this matter how big your screen is, with the amount of pixels in that area???


Yes, for 720p there are about 1 million pixels on the screen and for 1080p (Full HD) there are about 2 million pixels on the screen.

FPS does depend on your GPU power, but also on the settings you choose. The faster your GPU is, the higher settings and resolution you'll be able to select. Normally for gaming at 1920x1080 (1080p) you don't need more than 1GB of video memory. For bigger resolutions, like 2560x1600, you may need 1.5-2GB. Let me put it like this- every pixel contains its own chunk of visual data. So for higher resolutions, the GPU needs more memory to store that data and then process it into what you see on the screen.

Quote:
I'm pretty sure that these are very high Fps I'm trying to achieve but I'm not sure. I have seen some videos on yt saying that they are between 180-200+ Fps, what makes this possible?


You are trying to achieve the minimum FPS that some people call "fluid", which is kind of high. Everyone is different though, example- I can play just fine at 30 FPS. People normally manage to get such insane amounts of FPS by adding 2 or more GPUs in 1 system or a single, very powerful card.

Quote:
I want to get a high resolution monitor so from what I've been reading on wiki. I can transfer this kind of resolution through an hdmi or a dvi because this is basically just a transfer cable right? Or is hdmi only capable of transferring a max resolution of 1080p? I'm so confused??????


Just get a normal, 1920x1080 monitor, you'll be happy with it. If it is a monitor you will be connecting, then you'll only need a DVI cable. HDMI is used when connecting HDTVs and using them as monitors.

I hope this cleared it up a bit, feel free to ask if I've missed something :) 
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a b U Graphics card
January 5, 2013 4:00:49 AM

Oh and almost forgot- a 7870 or a 660ti will be more than enough for gaming at 1080p. GTX 580 is kind of outdated and the 660ti is about as powerful anyway.
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a b U Graphics card
January 5, 2013 4:13:34 AM

wow long list, let me try:
1080 is 1920x1080 resolution, multiply them and you'll get the number of pixels.

basically the more pixels the gpu has to push, the harder it is, the more video mem you will need (among other factors)
higher textures will require more video ram also, like the hi-res pack of crysis2 for example. But resolution is not everything, just like video ram is not everything.

for a gpu, even if you have 3gb of video ram, if you have a low end card, it wont help, a good 1gb gpu will beat the heck out of that cheap card even if it has 3gb. just an example

it's not the size of the screen, it's the number of pixels, a 20incher in 1080p is basically the same with a 24incher in 1080p in terms of performance since (all other things equal)

fps has sooo many factors, gpu and procie are important (also the quality of the game, how they are made, gta4 for example is not optimized)

older games tend to reach 3-digit fps since they are lighter now with modern hardware.

so a balanced rig is the key, if you have a very fast gpu, if your procie is too slow for it then you have a bottleneck, it's like one leg is slower than the other. a good amount of ram is needed also, nowadays 8gb is the sweet spot in my opinion.

for gpu, a 660ti is a very good buy, faster than a 580.

to give an idea, i have a 2500k 4ghz procie, 8gb ram, gtx 670 and i can play bf3 multiplayer smoothly on ultra, and i'm using a 120hz monitor (3d).

hope this helps somehow
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January 5, 2013 4:17:17 AM

Yes cleared this cleared everything up. Thank you

I posted in another section that I was going to build a gaming system at the end of january and I'm just trying to round up all of my information before I do so.

I have a $2000 dollar limit and this includes a monitor as well.

Thanks for the help everyone I think I'm all cleared up on this issue.


While your here... I see so many mixed opinions on dual GPU's or one single GPU.
IF I am will to drop a grand on a GPU/GPU's, wold you recommend going with two good GPU's or one high end GPU
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January 5, 2013 4:23:36 AM

Yes all of your replies helped tremendously, I cant thank you enough.

Proice must mean CPU, still trying to get the slang down. I'm new to the pc gaming community
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a b U Graphics card
January 5, 2013 4:43:14 AM

i don't like multiple gpu's some games cant handle them well.
a good gpu is better, then sell it later to reduce cost of your upgrade.

lower power consumption, less heat, less clutter
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January 5, 2013 4:51:14 AM

I would rather get 1 powerful card, as there are typically fewer issues with one card. Additionally, as technology advances, and that single card is no longer good enough, you can simply buy another one and put them in SLI/Crossfire. (SLI = NVidia, Crossfire = AMD, they both mean "multi GPU setup")

Whereas if you buy 2 cards that are powerful together, when the time comes, you won't have room to upgrade, you'll have to completely scrap those cards and get new ones.

Also, multi-GPU setups don't scale perfectly. What this means, if you have a single card "x" and "x" puts out 50 Frames Per Second (FPS), putting two "x" cards in a multi-GPU setup will not yield 100 FPS. (almost always).

And welcome the the PC gaming community!
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a c 177 U Graphics card
January 5, 2013 5:28:10 AM

Quote:
Quote:


I think I understand that pixels are length x height... right ?????




Yes.


Nope. That's resolution. I hope I don't muddle this up to much seeing as OP seems to have his answer. Pixels are the things that make up the screen and give it color. They are arranged X by Y. (left to right, then top to bottom.) So if you have a 16:9 screen that's "1080" then its 1920 long by 1080 rows of pixels tall. (P comes from TV. You can have interlaced or progressive scan. Look up the terms on wiki if you want to know more. Doesn't apply to monitors.) My laptop has the older 16:10 ratio so its 1920x1200.

So as mentioned above the more pixels you have, the harder your GPU has to work. You can straight multiply them together. 1920x1080 means each frame has over 2M pixels. A "720" resolution is just under 1M. 1080 will pack a lot more detail and force a card to work harder.

They can do over 200FPS if they have Vsync turned off. There are a lot of good articles on Vsync so please look them up. Internally you might render a game at 200FPS, but as long as you have a 60Hz monitor you will only see 60 of them. Doesn't hurt to have the extra power however.

I also vote one powerful card if you have the choice. CF/SLI can have issues so avoid it when possible.

Edited to try and fix quotes. Cant see whats wrong...
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January 5, 2013 5:39:24 AM

Thanks for the advice

I really appreciate all of your input. This is helping me greatly
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