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Is "Apply overclock at system startup" safe to do?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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January 5, 2013 4:49:42 AM

I am new to overclocking and I just overclocked my GTX 660 Ti Power Edition OC Edition.

I used MSI Afterburner and I made the Core Clock +70 and the Memory Clock +350.

I ran the Unigine Heaven benchmark and it passed and my temps were at around 60C when it finished.

So in the Afterburner menu, at the bottom is "Apply overclocking on system startup". Should I check this? Or is it not recommended?

I want my GPU to be able to be at lower clocks while idle.

If I check it, will it not allow the GPU to be at lower clocks when idle?

Thanks!
a c 217 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
January 5, 2013 4:54:55 AM

Yes, it is safe, as long as it is a stable OC. The thing is, at start up, it won't be using the OC anyways, assuming you assigned it to the 3D profile. It will only OC when you enter a 3D game.

I would, however, warn you about such a large memory OC. You get limited benefits from the memory OC, and DDR5 tends to be far more likely to wear out rapidly with too high of an OC, even if it seems stable.
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a c 147 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
January 5, 2013 4:59:20 AM

^+1
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January 5, 2013 5:11:59 AM

bystander said:
Yes, it is safe, as long as it is a stable OC. The thing is, at start up, it won't be using the OC anyways, assuming you assigned it to the 3D profile. It will only OC when you enter a 3D game.

I would, however, warn you about such a large memory OC. You get limited benefits from the memory OC, and DDR5 tends to be far more likely to wear out rapidly with too high of an OC, even if it seems stable.




Ah ok, what do you suggest I make the memory OC to then?
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a c 217 U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
January 5, 2013 3:01:37 PM

I personally am running at stock memory clocks, because with only a 100 mhz OC, my 680 went bad recently. The memory went bad. Back when the 6950's were popular, people unlocking them into 6970's, had their memory go bad very often.

I think the reason is because DDR5 memory has error correction, so you don't know when you have an unstable clock. Instead of seeing artifacts when you have pushed it too far, the memory does error corrects and appears to work, until it is too late.
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