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Active Noise Cancellation: Because You Can't Kill Your Nei..

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April 22, 2004 3:28:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hi. I have a neurological condition that makes me especially
sensitive to sound. It's very hard to think when there is
uncontrollable noise around me (as in the office where I work - people
talking, opening cellophane wrappers on candy, etc), and sometimes it
is even physically painful. It's certainly very tiring.

I've been looking at active noise cancelling headphones to help combat
this. I like how the Bose QuietComfort II headphones can be worn
without listening to music, but with the noise cancellation still on.
I want that option, to have the noise cancellation always on, and
listen to music only if I feel like it. I get tired of listening to
music all the time to drown out the other sounds. I really just want
it to be quiet.

Over-the-ear hearing protectors such as you find in hardware stores
don't work well enough, and anything I have to insert in my ear canal
is too painful to use for very long. So I need something external.

I keep reading how Bose has this awful reputation, and $300 is a lot
of money to gamble on something working the way I want it to. I know
what I want, but I don't know what I should get. Sennheiser? Bose
QC2? Sony MDR-NC20? I'm no audiophile, and I'm out of my depth
trying to make this decision on my own.

Can anyone please offer advice?
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 7:27:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hi,

I heard the QC2 at the local Bose store here in Durham, and they work
quite well. Yes, you can turn off the music and just have it cancel
the noise. I would subjectively say the noise cancellation is maybe 15
dB.

The biggest problem is the battery life (I think the salesman said you
only get a few hours from a set of batteries). Perhaps you could rig
up a power supply if you plan on using them at your desk or otherwise
for long periods of time in one spot.

--Randy

isbat1@yahoo.com (vector) writes:

> Hi. I have a neurological condition that makes me especially
> sensitive to sound. It's very hard to think when there is
> uncontrollable noise around me (as in the office where I work - people
> talking, opening cellophane wrappers on candy, etc), and sometimes it
> is even physically painful. It's certainly very tiring.
>
> I've been looking at active noise cancelling headphones to help combat
> this. I like how the Bose QuietComfort II headphones can be worn
> without listening to music, but with the noise cancellation still on.
> I want that option, to have the noise cancellation always on, and
> listen to music only if I feel like it. I get tired of listening to
> music all the time to drown out the other sounds. I really just want
> it to be quiet.
>
> Over-the-ear hearing protectors such as you find in hardware stores
> don't work well enough, and anything I have to insert in my ear canal
> is too painful to use for very long. So I need something external.
>
> I keep reading how Bose has this awful reputation, and $300 is a lot
> of money to gamble on something working the way I want it to. I know
> what I want, but I don't know what I should get. Sennheiser? Bose
> QC2? Sony MDR-NC20? I'm no audiophile, and I'm out of my depth
> trying to make this decision on my own.
>
> Can anyone please offer advice?

--
Randy Yates
Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications
Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
randy.yates@sonyericsson.com, 919-472-1124
Anonymous
April 22, 2004 7:27:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 22 Apr 2004 15:27:57 -0400, Randy Yates <randy.yates@sonyericsson.com> wrote:
>Hi,

>I heard the QC2 at the local Bose store here in Durham, and they work
>quite well. Yes, you can turn off the music and just have it cancel
>the noise. I would subjectively say the noise cancellation is maybe 15
>dB.

that's no better than ear muffs.
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Anonymous
April 23, 2004 3:09:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"vector" <isbat1@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:7961e1f9.0404221028.34f2f96@posting.google.com...
> Hi. I have a neurological condition that makes me especially
> sensitive to sound. It's very hard to think when there is
> uncontrollable noise around me (as in the office where I work - people
> talking, opening cellophane wrappers on candy, etc), and sometimes it
> is even physically painful. It's certainly very tiring.
>
> I've been looking at active noise cancelling headphones to help combat
> this. I like how the Bose QuietComfort II headphones can be worn
> without listening to music, but with the noise cancellation still on.
> I want that option, to have the noise cancellation always on, and
> listen to music only if I feel like it. I get tired of listening to
> music all the time to drown out the other sounds. I really just want
> it to be quiet.
>
> Over-the-ear hearing protectors such as you find in hardware stores
> don't work well enough, and anything I have to insert in my ear canal
> is too painful to use for very long. So I need something external.
>
> I keep reading how Bose has this awful reputation, and $300 is a lot
> of money to gamble on something working the way I want it to. I know
> what I want, but I don't know what I should get. Sennheiser? Bose
> QC2? Sony MDR-NC20? I'm no audiophile, and I'm out of my depth
> trying to make this decision on my own.
>
> Can anyone please offer advice?

http://www.headwize.com/projects/noise_prj.htm

I know Marc Goodman personally and have tried his version of these
headphones.
They work wonderfully.
I'd be tempted to use radio controlled model battery packs though although
if it's just noise cancelling that you want then you won't need the voltage
doubler either.
cb
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 5:44:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"TCS" <The-Central-Scrutinizer@p.o.b.o.x.com> wrote in message
news:slrnc8g8g4.qnt.The-Central-Scrutinizer@linux.client.comcast.net...
> On 22 Apr 2004 15:27:57 -0400, Randy Yates <randy.yates@sonyericsson.com>
wrote:
> >Hi,
>
> >I heard the QC2 at the local Bose store here in Durham, and they work
> >quite well. Yes, you can turn off the music and just have it cancel
> >the noise. I would subjectively say the noise cancellation is maybe 15
> >dB.

> that's no better than ear muffs.

They are better than ear muffs at low frequencies only. You will find most
ear muffs are rated only at mid frequencies.

TonyP.
Anonymous
April 23, 2004 5:44:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"TonyP" <TonyP@optus.net.com.au> wrote in message
news:40889120$0$20219$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
>
> "TCS" <The-Central-Scrutinizer@p.o.b.o.x.com> wrote in message
> news:slrnc8g8g4.qnt.The-Central-Scrutinizer@linux.client.comcast.net...
> > On 22 Apr 2004 15:27:57 -0400, Randy Yates
<randy.yates@sonyericsson.com>
> wrote:
> > >Hi,
> >
> > >I heard the QC2 at the local Bose store here in Durham, and they work
> > >quite well. Yes, you can turn off the music and just have it cancel
> > >the noise. I would subjectively say the noise cancellation is maybe 15
> > >dB.
>
> > that's no better than ear muffs.
>
> They are better than ear muffs at low frequencies only. You will find most
> ear muffs are rated only at mid frequencies.

There's that and there's also advantages to doing it yourself with some
earphones that allow your ears to breathe...
cb
April 24, 2004 2:45:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

You might consider seeing an audiologist who can fit you with
comfortable in ear devices. There are medical devices specifically
available for hyperacusis, Benefits have been found using sound
generators (special hearing aids) that emit broad band white or pink
noise. Bottom line is you need an audiogram if you haven't already
had one. There are of course many causes of hyperacusis and treating
the underlying cause (such as TMJ, Lyme disease, drug related,
Meniere's, recruitment disorders of hearing. etc.)

Hey, trust me. I'm a doctor (but not ENT).

....Moose


On 22 Apr 2004 11:28:53 -0700, isbat1@yahoo.com (vector) wrote:

>Hi. I have a neurological condition that makes me especially
>sensitive to sound. It's very hard to think when there is
>uncontrollable noise around me (as in the office where I work - people
>talking, opening cellophane wrappers on candy, etc), and sometimes it
>is even physically painful. It's certainly very tiring.
>
>I've been looking at active noise cancelling headphones to help combat
>this. I like how the Bose QuietComfort II headphones can be worn
>without listening to music, but with the noise cancellation still on.
>I want that option, to have the noise cancellation always on, and
>listen to music only if I feel like it. I get tired of listening to
>music all the time to drown out the other sounds. I really just want
>it to be quiet.
>
>Over-the-ear hearing protectors such as you find in hardware stores
>don't work well enough, and anything I have to insert in my ear canal
>is too painful to use for very long. So I need something external.
>
>I keep reading how Bose has this awful reputation, and $300 is a lot
>of money to gamble on something working the way I want it to. I know
>what I want, but I don't know what I should get. Sennheiser? Bose
>QC2? Sony MDR-NC20? I'm no audiophile, and I'm out of my depth
>trying to make this decision on my own.
>
>Can anyone please offer advice?
April 26, 2004 12:42:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

isbat1@yahoo.com (vector) wrote in message news:<7961e1f9.0404221028.34f2f96@posting.google.com>...

Thank you everyone for all your responses. I appreciate the help.
!