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Problem With Spikes/Pops through Speakers

Last response: in Home Audio
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Anonymous
May 2, 2004 3:42:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I've heard of devices such as noise filters, AC Line interference filters
and spike suppressors, but am not sure if any of these or other devices can
solve my problem.

I have a mobile DJ setup consisting of a mixer, CD player, amp, Furman Power
Conditioner and light controller in a case.

I also have a laptop, external hard drive, subwoofer, cordless mic and fog
machine.

The mixer, CD player, cordless microphone, external hard drive, light
controller and laptop are all plugged into the Furman. The ground for the
laptop is lifted with a 3 to 2 prong adaptor which eliminates a previous
ground loop isolation problem that used to exist (i.e humming).

The Furman and amp are plugged into the same extension cord with a 3-socket
adaptor and plugged into the wall. The subwoofer is plugged into the wall
with its separate extension cord. The fog machine is also plugged into the
wall with its own extension cord.

Supposedly, each wall socket that each extension cord was plugged into was
on a separate circuit. However, whenever I pressed the fog machine switch
and released it, I would hear a loud "POP" going through the speakers. As a
result, I could not use the fog machine with the risk that the sound would
blow the speakers.

If the fog machine was actually on the same circuit as the amp or subwoofer,
I assume that would explain the popping sound? If they were not on the same
circuit, but each wall socket had the same ground source, could that explain
this?

In either event, since I often cannot control how I plug in my equipment at
a location, is there any device that will actually decrease or eliminate the
popping sound (i.e. something that I can plug the fog machine into)?

Thank you.

Andy
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 5:41:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Legaldeejay wrote:

><snip>
> Supposedly, each wall socket that each extension cord was plugged into was
> on a separate circuit. However, whenever I pressed the fog machine switch
> and released it, I would hear a loud "POP" going through the speakers. As a
> result, I could not use the fog machine with the risk that the sound would
> blow the speakers.
>
> If the fog machine was actually on the same circuit as the amp or subwoofer,
> I assume that would explain the popping sound? If they were not on the same
> circuit, but each wall socket had the same ground source, could that explain
> this?
>
><snip>

If you have used this equipment before without pops, then the location
wiring may be a problem. If you always have pops, then the fog machine
may be generating RF or line spikes to which the amplification equipment
is sensitive.

The first thing to try would be to check the power switch for the fog
machine. If it does not already have capacitors across the contacts,
install a cap for each switch contact. That will prevent "arcing" which
is a typical source for this type of noise problem.
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 5:51:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Robert:

Thanks for your response.

I am not an electrician, so how do I do this? Opening up the fog machine,
and then what am I looking for?

The switch is actually a remote device that is plugged into the fog machine
with a 25 ft. long cord.


"Robert Gault" <robert.gault@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:yU6lc.11035$Ut1.335428@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> Legaldeejay wrote:
>
> ><snip>
> > Supposedly, each wall socket that each extension cord was plugged into
was
> > on a separate circuit. However, whenever I pressed the fog machine
switch
> > and released it, I would hear a loud "POP" going through the speakers.
As a
> > result, I could not use the fog machine with the risk that the sound
would
> > blow the speakers.
> >
> > If the fog machine was actually on the same circuit as the amp or
subwoofer,
> > I assume that would explain the popping sound? If they were not on the
same
> > circuit, but each wall socket had the same ground source, could that
explain
> > this?
> >
> ><snip>
>
> If you have used this equipment before without pops, then the location
> wiring may be a problem. If you always have pops, then the fog machine
> may be generating RF or line spikes to which the amplification equipment
> is sensitive.
>
> The first thing to try would be to check the power switch for the fog
> machine. If it does not already have capacitors across the contacts,
> install a cap for each switch contact. That will prevent "arcing" which
> is a typical source for this type of noise problem.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
May 2, 2004 6:41:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Legaldeejay wrote:
> Robert:
>
> Thanks for your response.
>
> I am not an electrician, so how do I do this? Opening up the fog machine,
> and then what am I looking for?
>
> The switch is actually a remote device that is plugged into the fog machine
> with a 25 ft. long cord.
>
>
> "Robert Gault" <robert.gault@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
> news:yU6lc.11035$Ut1.335428@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
>>Legaldeejay wrote:
>>
>>
>>><snip>
>>>Supposedly, each wall socket that each extension cord was plugged into
>
> was
>
>>>on a separate circuit. However, whenever I pressed the fog machine
>
> switch
>
>>>and released it, I would hear a loud "POP" going through the speakers.
>
> As a
>
>>>result, I could not use the fog machine with the risk that the sound
>
> would
>
>>>blow the speakers.
>>>
>>>If the fog machine was actually on the same circuit as the amp or
>
> subwoofer,
>
>>>I assume that would explain the popping sound? If they were not on the
>
> same
>
>>>circuit, but each wall socket had the same ground source, could that
>
> explain
>
>>>this?
>>>
>>
>> ><snip>
>>
>>If you have used this equipment before without pops, then the location
>>wiring may be a problem. If you always have pops, then the fog machine
>>may be generating RF or line spikes to which the amplification equipment
>>is sensitive.
>>
>>The first thing to try would be to check the power switch for the fog
>>machine. If it does not already have capacitors across the contacts,
>>install a cap for each switch contact. That will prevent "arcing" which
>>is a typical source for this type of noise problem.
>>
>
>
>

Ouch! Since I don't know how your fog machine is wired and even if I
did, you indicate having little experience in electronic or electrical
modifications, it would not be safe to proceed along this path.

That leaves open only power strips with built-in filtering. You will
have to hope they can isolate the noise which seems to originate in the
fog machine.
April 25, 2011 12:09:28 AM

Any Updates? I'm experiencing a very similar problem with my bass amplifier and I was wondering what solution you came up with.
I have a 600W amplifier head and digital tuner racked together with a JuiceGoose surge supressor/power strip installed at the back side of the rack, feeding power to both the tuner and amp. I'm getting a loud pop anytime I turn the tuner on/off while the amp is powered up. Also, the amp gives a loud pop before fading out when it's turned off; upon power-up there's an approx 15 sec warm-up delay before any signal is sent to the speaker cabinet, so no pop then.
The only way I've been able to avoid the pop is to power off the whole rack with the switch on the JuiceGoose at the back of the rack and then turn off the individual switches while dead. Everything sounds great otherwise. I just don't want to needlessly stress out the horn in my cabinet... OR run the risk of this turning into a bigger problem. Also, this is the kind of issue that could affect resale.
Also noteworthy:
1) The amp's tuner output (instrument level from the amp to the tuner) only results in the tuner indicating a freq input bordering between A# and B (60hz from a ground loop?) and will not respond to notes from the instrument which are clearly audible through the speaker cabinet without noticeable noise. An instrument plugged directly into the same input on the tuner with the same cable, however, is detected and may be tuned normally.
2) There have been occasions where other, unconnected electrical load in the same room (oscillating fan, electric heater) will produce the same pop when turned on/off. Smaller load such as 9v adapters plugged into JuiceGoose or other guitar amps, or PA in the same room have not caused the pop. Initial inrush current to even a small 120V AC fan motor is considerable.

Anybody have any clues?
October 1, 2012 2:01:42 AM

Has anyone found a fix for this Pop/Snap? Im also a DJ and have had the same issue. please contact me at musicprodj@yahoo.com.

Im also a DJ and I started to get a SNAP/POP when I turn on any of my lights and also when my Haze machine kicks on and off. I’ve changed out cables mixers and amps and I can not get rid of it, do you sell anything for that? I have everything plugged in to 2 Furman power conditioners, ground light is on and protected. This has happened in my last 5 parties and all were in newer buildings before that I rarely had it, in fact it had been years since I had that problem so im wondering if my Furman PL PRO DM power conditioners are wearing out, I contacted them and all they wanted me to do was buy a new one with more filtering.



October 11, 2012 9:18:59 PM

This type of problem is complicated and my first thought was that the switch turning the fog machine on needed capacitors wired to it. It is also possible that the power conditioners that you are using have degraded. The main way that these devices work is with a metal oxide varistor (MOV). Every time a surge hits one of these they loose some effectiveness. This happens with time to almost all surge suppressors so try to use a new one with as high a current rating as you can.
You can also try a ferrite core that the power cord would go through. These snap over the cord so involve no electrical skill and don't cost much.
!