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Best gaming rig $3500 budget

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February 27, 2013 2:23:57 PM

I won a $3500 gift certificate to be used online at amazon.com and I've always wanted to build an "overkill" computer. Before anyone suggests there is nothing else I need from amazon...I just want to buy a killer computer (I know some of the prices are high but it's free money)! This is what I've come up with so far:

Gaming/Video Editing

MB: ASUS P9X79 WS LGA 2011 Intel X79 $380 (or ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 LGA 1155 Intel Z77)
CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K Hexa-Core Processor 3.2 Ghz 12 MB Cache $560 (or Intel Core i7-3770K Quad-Core Processor 3.5 GHz)
GPU: ???? EVGA GTX 680? 690? 580?
RAM: Corsair Dominator Platinum Pro 32GB $430
Monitor?: Asus LED MX239H $255
Case: Corsair CC600TWM-WHT Special Edition Graphite Series 600T $165
SSD: OCZ Technology 128GB Vertex 4 $110
Cool: Corsair H100i $110
OpDr: ASUS Optical Drive BW-14D1XT $110
PU: Corsair 860i $240

Suggestions? I am not stuck on anything yet except the case!

More about : gaming rig 3500 budget

February 27, 2013 5:45:48 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Go2q
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Go2q/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Go2q/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110 94.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO/THUNDERBOLT ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($232.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($243.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: A-Data XPG SX900 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($114.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($549.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($549.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 600T White Graphite ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.15 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 900W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($141.45 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHBS112-29 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($134.35 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($135.97 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: ViewSonic VX2770Smh-LED 27.0" Monitor ($278.28 @ Amazon)
Monitor: ViewSonic VX2770Smh-LED 27.0" Monitor ($278.28 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.86 @ Mac Connection)
Mouse: Razer RZ01-00152400-R3M1 Wired Optical Mouse ($45.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $3363.24
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 15:05 EST-0500)
February 27, 2013 5:53:50 PM

bodeen2012 said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GnLc
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GnLc/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GnLc/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110 94.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO/THUNDERBOLT ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($232.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($243.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: A-Data XPG SX900 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($114.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($549.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($549.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 600T White Graphite ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.15 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 900W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($141.45 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHBS112-29 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($134.35 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: ViewSonic VX2770Smh-LED 27.0" Monitor ($278.28 @ Amazon)
Monitor: ViewSonic VX2770Smh-LED 27.0" Monitor ($278.28 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.86 @ Mac Connection)
Mouse: Razer RZ01-00152400-R3M1 Wired Optical Mouse ($45.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $3317.25
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 14:45 EST-0500)


32 GB of RAM isn't supported by Home Premium...
Related resources
February 27, 2013 6:02:15 PM

Quote:
32 GB of RAM isn't supported by Home Premium...
brain fart fixed
February 27, 2013 6:03:24 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.06 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($105.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 650D ATX Mid Tower Case ($149.93 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($155.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.22 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Acer HN274Hbmiiid 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($399.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: SteelSeries 6GV/2 Wired Standard Keyboard ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder 2013 Wired Optical Mouse ($56.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3080.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 15:03 EST-0500)
February 27, 2013 8:20:25 PM

SHORYUKEN said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.06 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($105.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 650D ATX Mid Tower Case ($149.93 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($155.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.22 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Acer HN274Hbmiiid 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($399.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: SteelSeries 6GV/2 Wired Standard Keyboard ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder 2013 Wired Optical Mouse ($56.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3080.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 15:03 EST-0500)


Way too much money put into storage on this build. You could scale that back quite a bit and still not use all of that on a 2TB hard drive.

I'd get this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($192.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($55.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($148.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($144.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk III 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($145.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1893.72
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 17:20 EST-0500)

Then add a nice 1440p monitor, a set of Audioengine A5s, and whatever keyboard and mouse you want. Avoid buying Logitech tin can speakers - get some real ones on that budget.
February 27, 2013 8:23:47 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Way too much money put into storage on this build. You could scale that back quite a bit and still not use all of that on a 2TB hard drive.

I'd get this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($192.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($55.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($148.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($144.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk III 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($145.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1893.72
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 17:20 EST-0500)

Then add a nice 1440p monitor, a set of Audioengine A5s, and whatever keyboard and mouse you want. Avoid buying Logitech tin can speakers - get some real ones on that budget.


That's assuming he doesn't need that much storage.
February 27, 2013 8:30:22 PM

SHORYUKEN said:
That's assuming he doesn't need that much storage.


Yeah but even the Library of Congress doesn't have enough material to fill 5TB. :lol: 
February 27, 2013 8:47:25 PM

Out of all these builds, g-units is the best bang for the buck
February 27, 2013 9:02:52 PM

Heres my jab at it. Its more suited for your budget. I didn't include OS, monitors, or peripherals though. Even if you include those, you should still be under your budget.

If you want an nvidia card, get 2 gtx 670's instead.



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PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqyR
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqyR/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqyR/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Gene Micro ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Antec Twelve Hundred V3 ATX Full Tower Case ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($155.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $2450.70
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 18:01 EST-0500)
February 27, 2013 9:10:05 PM

This is what I would put together, using your case you selected. All parts should be from Amazon (EDIT: except the Tuniq TX-2, get it for $7 at Newegg). This build gives you the ability to really OC, dual gpus for the 1440p monitor, great speakers (I have these, but you could go with AudioEngine's as suggested above, those are great too), an awesome SSD and a really solid PSU. Also, according to recent review, the H80i is just as effective as the 100i, weirdly, and easier to install and not as expensive. That's why I included it.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($324.72 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Thermal Compound: TUNIQ TX-2 3.5g Thermal Paste
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($105.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($73.52 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($453.55 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 600T White Graphite ATX Mid Tower Case ($163.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.98 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Full (64-bit)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($649.99 @ Amazon)
Other: Audyssey Lower East Side Media Speaker ($146.00)
Total: $3212.68
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 18:02 EST-0500)
February 27, 2013 9:29:35 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($560.98 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($80.50 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($219.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($169.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($133.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Galaxy GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (Gun Metal) ATX Full Tower Case ($161.72 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: Kingwin Lazer Platinum 850W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($649.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3093.09
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 18:12 EST-0500)
February 27, 2013 9:30:34 PM

aebome said:
This is what I would put together, using your case you selected. All parts should be from Amazon (EDIT: except the Tuniq TX-2, get it for $7 at Newegg). This build gives you the ability to really OC, dual gpus for the 1440p monitor, great speakers (I have these, but you could go with AudioEngine's as suggested above, those are great too), an awesome SSD and a really solid PSU. Also, according to recent review, the H80i is just as effective as the 100i, weirdly, and easier to install and not as expensive. That's why I included it.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GqHg/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($324.72 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Thermal Compound: TUNIQ TX-2 3.5g Thermal Paste
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($105.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($73.52 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($453.55 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 600T White Graphite ATX Mid Tower Case ($163.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.98 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Full (64-bit)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($649.99 @ Amazon)
Other: Audyssey Lower East Side Media Speaker ($146.00)
Total: $3212.68
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 18:02 EST-0500)


H80 gets out performed by many aircoolers cheaper than it
February 27, 2013 9:33:37 PM

If you want the best REASONABLE build that would still be overkill for everything get something like this:

i7 3770k
Asus Sabertooth Z77 LGA1155 Motherboard
2x EVGA GTX 680 (Any model will do)
32GB Corsair Dominator Platinum RAM
a couple 256gb SSD's of your choice. kingston and OCZ have some good options.
a 2-3TB HDD. I have a 750gb one, only actually came as 680 gigs and I've still got well over 500 gigs left :) 
NZXT Switch 810 case.
Maybe the new closed loop water cooler from corsair?
Corsair makes some nice high wattage PSU's, check out the AX series.
Get a blu ray drive, just so you can say you have it 8D
maybe a fan controller/some card readers. This would be all you'll need for the next few years, and more. I left some things really vague so you can customize things for yourself. If you wanna add some extra stuff, grab another 64GB SSD and use it for cache. :)  cheers good luck.
February 27, 2013 9:37:18 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah but even the Library of Congress doesn't have enough material to fill 5TB. :lol: 


Hehe I guess, but I have OCD when it comes to storage or something, as I don't like not having a lot of storage. I guess if OP really wanted to, he could get more storage along the way.
February 27, 2013 9:39:29 PM

Zed_Spooge said:
If you want the best REASONABLE build that would still be overkill for everything get something like this:

i7 3770k
Asus Sabertooth Z77 LGA1155 Motherboard
2x EVGA GTX 680 (Any model will do)
32GB Corsair Dominator Platinum RAM
a couple 256gb SSD's of your choice. kingston and OCZ have some good options.
a 2-3TB HDD. I have a 750gb one, only actually came as 680 gigs and I've still got well over 500 gigs left :) 
NZXT Switch 810 case.
Maybe the new closed loop water cooler from corsair?
Corsair makes some nice high wattage PSU's, check out the AX series.
Get a blu ray drive, just so you can say you have it 8D
maybe a fan controller/some card readers. This would be all you'll need for the next few years, and more. I left some things really vague so you can customize things for yourself. If you wanna add some extra stuff, grab another 64GB SSD and use it for cache. :)  cheers good luck.


Sabertooth isn't a reasonable choice - it's expensive and that plastic "thermal armor" traps more heat than it's designed to prevent. You don't need more than one SSD and it's not worth buying a BD-R drive just to say you have it. :ange: 

And how is 32GB of Dominator Platinum reasonable? You're paying like $600 for that RAM, and for not a lot of performance benefit either, that's a HUGE waste of money.

And X79 isn't really needed if gaming is the primary focus of this rig.
February 27, 2013 9:43:56 PM

Shoryuken, let me just say your profile picture made my millennium.

i lav u
February 27, 2013 9:48:02 PM

"Reasonable that's still HUGE overkill"

sabertooth board just looks pretty,
if op has money, make his computer pretty as well as functional.

and dominator platinum ram is arguably THE best, so. why not.
February 27, 2013 10:04:21 PM

The OP is better off with two GTX Titans in SLI.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Grqc

This build will max out every game on 1080p, such as Crysis 3 and Far Cry 3. There are some minor changes you could make (case, monitor, etc.) but this is the basic build.
February 27, 2013 10:48:39 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-C14 CPU Cooler ($79.72 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme6 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($159.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($52.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($176.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced ATX Full Tower Case ($171.10 @ TigerDirect)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 1000W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($174.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($84.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: HP L240w 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($292.36 @ Compuvest)
Total: $3479.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 19:47 EST-0500)

You need to grab a couple Titans. Will crush any game into the foreseeable future.
February 27, 2013 10:50:49 PM

Points:

1) CPU:
Get the i7-3770K (I usually recommend the i5-3570K but there are cases such as video converting and some times in gaming the i7-3770K benefits. The PS4 is also an 8-core console which should help multi-threaded gaming design. More than the i7-3770K is generally a waste though.)

2) Motherboard:
*I have the Z77 Sabertooth mainly for the 5-year Warranty. Some things you should know:
a) Install the ASSIST FANS, but use the Asus Thermal Radar software to set them to NOT turn on until 50degC (and 1minute for shutoff). They buzz too loudly so you ONLY want them on if there is a problem with overheating not in normal use.)

b) BIOS to latest

c) Fan control for CPU and case fans is PWM. I strongly recommend using NOCTUA PWM fans (i.e. 300RPM to 1300RPM). Make sure to use PWM case fans for best noise management.

d) the Antec ONE case (discontinued) did not have enough clearance for the top fan as the 8-pin CPU connector fits a few mm's higher than the motherboard. Double-check clearance for your case and the top fans/cooler setup.

e) USB3 and USB2 for the front of the case are supported, however I recommend a case with USB3 front support.

f) The AI SOFTWARE crashed my system with Windows 8. I had to do a System Restore recovery using my Windows 8 Install disc. I'm not sure if this has been fixed yet. My advice is just use THERMAL RADAR anyway as that's all you need.

g) The bottom two SATA connections are NOT for a DVD/BD device. It will cause bad burns (it's in the manual but I missed it). Use only hard drives there.

h) Use the INTEL SATA connectors for your main SSD.

3) SSD:
a) INTEL has the most reliable SSD's by far.
b) SAMSUNG 840 PRO's are great (Samsung 840 non-pro is not recommended as it uses TLC so there's no good statistics on reliability). Some SSD points:
- apply over-provisioning (i.e. Samsung Magician)
- update the firmware (I had to do a USB/DVD boot with Samsung Magician and Windows 8. Worked fine though)
- *I have THREE drives for my gaming rig:
DRIVE#1 - 128GB SSD (Windows 8 Pro, and programs)
DRIVE#2 - 256GB SSD
(my 2nd STEAM folder. I can backup from my Hard Drive then restore to the SSD. If I run out of space I simply restore back to the Hard Drive. You could easily use a smaller SSD this way just for ONLY the games you currently play. Also many don't benefit from SSD's much.)
DRIVE#3 - 3TB HDD
(Steam main, Downloads, Media etc.)

4) Acronis True Image 2013:
Setup an AUTOMATED backup for your Windows drive to the Hard Drive. (just use an incremental CHAIN that deletes older versions. Do a WEEKLY backup).

5) GRAPHICS CARD:
**Never use TWO GPU's (2xSLI). Even the latest review of the Geforce Titan has the experts recommending a single $1000 Titan over the $1000 GTX690 despite the 690 getting far better frame rates in many modern games.

Many people will say I'm full of crap and the issue is minor but it's not. Anyway, my recommend is the Geforce Titan even if you have to wait several weeks.

READ THIS:
http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...

6) DDR3 RAM:
More than 8GB is pointless unless you have a requirement for it other than gaming. In fact, you're better off with 8GB of 2133MHz than 32GB of 1600MHz since a few games can actually benefit (not many, but may be more in the future).
*Be careful that your RAM is not too TALL for your cooling solution (a non-issue with water-cooling).
- I prefer G. Skill.

7) DVD/BluRay burner:
*Make sure to go to the manufacturer website and find out how OLD the FIRMWARE is. Firmware updates help prevent bad burners. I saw an Asus burner with 2009 firmware whereas the LG I bought recently had 2013 firmware.

I bought THIS one:
http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-Internal-Rewriter-...

**It's firmware is recent, and it also support M-Disc. These discs are ARCHIVAL discs (10-pack for $33). Perfect for backing up those family memories. Hard Drives fail, and even DVD's only last between 1 and 7 years. If you want to be in trouble, lose years of family pictures/video.

8) Windows 8 Pro 64-bit OEM (and get Stardock's Start8).
*Windows 8 is superior to Windows 7 in many ways. The new interface is a non-issue as that's easily avoided with Start8. Compatibility issues are very minor but there are several significant advantages (more secure, more reliable, boots faster, better SSD support, improved memory manager...).

I was unsure of making the switch (and hate the new interface) but I'm happy that did.

9) MONITORS?
*This is the MOST important part to me. I thought about three monitors but too much hassle. I thought about 3D.

I finally got a 27" with 2560x1440 and I could never go back to a smaller screen. I game mostly at 1920x1080 (due to minimal visual advantage but about 30% frame rate drop). I game at 2560x1440 in games like Starcraft 2 and Diablo 3 (small text/HUD).

THIS MONITOR ROCKS (as does the Dell Warranty). Currently some issue with shipping or something. The Dell warranty is a 3-year ZERO DEFECTS (even one dead pixel). My replacement showed up the NEXT DAY with the packaging and pre-paid waybill. I also spent $100 for a 2-year extension (zero worries for 5-years now).
http://www.amazon.com/Dell-U2713HM-IPS-LED-CVN85-27-Inc...
February 27, 2013 10:59:24 PM

2560x1440:
a) set DPI scaling to about 140%
b) use NOSQUINT in Firefox to pre-scale webpages
c) use CTRL+Scroll to manually resize webpages
d) use 1920x1080 for most games
e) use 2560x1440 for games like Diablo 3 (smaller text and max quality won't drop the frame rate below 60FPS)

*The NVIDIA GEFORCE EXPERIENCE software is designed to optimize for 40FPS. That's not really optimal for people with good gaming PC's. For example, I tweaked Max Payne 3 to achieve 60FPS about 90% of the time. The NVidia solution looked almost identical yet it not only got 40FPS average but you also got screen tearing. It's also confusing because they pick settings to optimize for 40FPS but also pick VSYNC ON and VSYNC always synch to the screen. If it's a 60Hz screen it will attempt to run at 60FPS, but if you aim for 40FPS it actually synchs to 30FPS instead (2 refreshes of the monitor for every frame to avoid screen tearing).

This software also makes poor choices such as 2560x1440 instead of 1920x1080 when that alone can bring you from 40FPS to about 52FPS with almost no noticeable difference in most games.
February 27, 2013 11:22:25 PM

photonboy said:
Points:

1) CPU:
Get the i7-3770K (I usually recommend the i5-3570K but there are cases such as video converting and some times in gaming the i7-3770K benefits. The PS4 is also an 8-core console which should help multi-threaded gaming design. More than the i7-3770K is generally a waste though.)

2) Motherboard:
*I have the Z77 Sabertooth mainly for the 5-year Warranty. Some things you should know:
a) Install the ASSIST FANS, but use the Asus Thermal Radar software to set them to NOT turn on until 50degC (and 1minute for shutoff). They buzz too loudly so you ONLY want them on if there is a problem with overheating not in normal use.)

b) BIOS to latest

c) Fan control for CPU and case fans is PWM. I strongly recommend using NOCTUA PWM fans (i.e. 300RPM to 1300RPM). Make sure to use PWM case fans for best noise management.

d) the Antec ONE case (discontinued) did not have enough clearance for the top fan as the 8-pin CPU connector fits a few mm's higher than the motherboard. Double-check clearance for your case and the top fans/cooler setup.

e) USB3 and USB2 for the front of the case are supported, however I recommend a case with USB3 front support.

f) The AI SOFTWARE crashed my system with Windows 8. I had to do a System Restore recovery using my Windows 8 Install disc. I'm not sure if this has been fixed yet. My advice is just use THERMAL RADAR anyway as that's all you need.

g) The bottom two SATA connections are NOT for a DVD/BD device. It will cause bad burns (it's in the manual but I missed it). Use only hard drives there.

h) Use the INTEL SATA connectors for your main SSD.

3) SSD:
a) INTEL has the most reliable SSD's by far.
b) SAMSUNG 840 PRO's are great (Samsung 840 non-pro is not recommended as it uses TLC so there's no good statistics on reliability). Some SSD points:
- apply over-provisioning (i.e. Samsung Magician)
- update the firmware (I had to do a USB/DVD boot with Samsung Magician and Windows 8. Worked fine though)
- *I have THREE drives for my gaming rig:
DRIVE#1 - 128GB SSD (Windows 8 Pro, and programs)
DRIVE#2 - 256GB SSD
(my 2nd STEAM folder. I can backup from my Hard Drive then restore to the SSD. If I run out of space I simply restore back to the Hard Drive. You could easily use a smaller SSD this way just for ONLY the games you currently play. Also many don't benefit from SSD's much.)
DRIVE#3 - 3TB HDD
(Steam main, Downloads, Media etc.)

4) Acronis True Image 2013:
Setup an AUTOMATED backup for your Windows drive to the Hard Drive. (just use an incremental CHAIN that deletes older versions. Do a WEEKLY backup).

5) GRAPHICS CARD:
**Never use TWO GPU's (2xSLI). Even the latest review of the Geforce Titan has the experts recommending a single $1000 Titan over the $1000 GTX690 despite the 690 getting far better frame rates in many modern games.

Many people will say I'm full of crap and the issue is minor but it's not. Anyway, my recommend is the Geforce Titan even if you have to wait several weeks.

READ THIS:
http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...

6) DDR3 RAM:
More than 8GB is pointless unless you have a requirement for it other than gaming. In fact, you're better off with 8GB of 2133MHz than 32GB of 1600MHz since a few games can actually benefit (not many, but may be more in the future).
*Be careful that your RAM is not too TALL for your cooling solution (a non-issue with water-cooling).
- I prefer G. Skill.

7) DVD/BluRay burner:
*Make sure to go to the manufacturer website and find out how OLD the FIRMWARE is. Firmware updates help prevent bad burners. I saw an Asus burner with 2009 firmware whereas the LG I bought recently had 2013 firmware.

I bought THIS one:
http://www.amazon.com/LG-Electronics-Internal-Rewriter-...

**It's firmware is recent, and it also support M-Disc. These discs are ARCHIVAL discs (10-pack for $33). Perfect for backing up those family memories. Hard Drives fail, and even DVD's only last between 1 and 7 years. If you want to be in trouble, lose years of family pictures/video.

8) Windows 8 Pro 64-bit OEM (and get Stardock's Start8).
*Windows 8 is superior to Windows 7 in many ways. The new interface is a non-issue as that's easily avoided with Start8. Compatibility issues are very minor but there are several significant advantages (more secure, more reliable, boots faster, better SSD support, improved memory manager...).

I was unsure of making the switch (and hate the new interface) but I'm happy that did.

9) MONITORS?
*This is the MOST important part to me. I thought about three monitors but too much hassle. I thought about 3D.

I finally got a 27" with 2560x1440 and I could never go back to a smaller screen. I game mostly at 1920x1080 (due to minimal visual advantage but about 30% frame rate drop). I game at 2560x1440 in games like Starcraft 2 and Diablo 3 (small text/HUD).

THIS MONITOR ROCKS (as does the Dell Warranty). Currently some issue with shipping or something. The Dell warranty is a 3-year ZERO DEFECTS (even one dead pixel). My replacement showed up the NEXT DAY with the packaging and pre-paid waybill. I also spent $100 for a 2-year extension (zero worries for 5-years now).
http://www.amazon.com/Dell-U2713HM-IPS-LED-CVN85-27-Inc...


Nope

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-titan-p...

As you can see, two SLI Titans are butter smooth, good scaling and no stuttering. The optimum solution.

February 28, 2013 4:23:55 AM

boulbox said:
He is saying that he would go for the Titans over the 690

Actually he is saying go for a single Titan over a 690. Hey, with three and a half grand, go for the best!
February 28, 2013 2:34:16 PM

babernet_1 said:
Nope

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-titan-p...

As you can see, two SLI Titans are butter smooth, good scaling and no stuttering. The optimum solution.


Interesting.
If I was investing money though I'd still investigate this further to see what's going on here and figure out why a GTX690 here demonstrates significantly worse micro-stutter yet both are based on nearly identical architecture. Still, that's fairly optimistic data so I hope this bears out in other games and resolutions.

If my budget was quite large like the one in this post I'd probably consider a single Titan.
February 28, 2013 3:19:58 PM

photonboy said:
Points:
3) SSD:
a) INTEL has the most reliable SSD's by far.
b) SAMSUNG 840 PRO's are great (Samsung 840 non-pro is not recommended as it uses TLC so there's no good statistics on reliability). Some SSD points:
- apply over-provisioning (i.e. Samsung Magician)
- update the firmware (I had to do a USB/DVD boot with Samsung Magician and Windows 8. Worked fine though)
- *I have THREE drives for my gaming rig:
DRIVE#1 - 128GB SSD (Windows 8 Pro, and programs)
DRIVE#2 - 256GB SSD
(my 2nd STEAM folder. I can backup from my Hard Drive then restore to the SSD. If I run out of space I simply restore back to the Hard Drive. You could easily use a smaller SSD this way just for ONLY the games you currently play. Also many don't benefit from SSD's much.)
DRIVE#3 - 3TB HDD
(Steam main, Downloads, Media etc.)


No they don't. I had an Intel SSD and it gave me nothing but problems - BSODs left and right and it never held a Windows update without me having to do system restore 1,000,000 times. I swapped it for a Samsung 830 and have been completely problem free.
February 28, 2013 3:43:14 PM

g-unit1111 said:
No they don't. I had an Intel SSD and it gave me nothing but problems - BSODs left and right and it never held a Windows update without me having to do system restore 1,000,000 times. I swapped it for a Samsung 830 and have been completely problem free.

Perhaps an RMA was in order. I'd hardly think that behavior is typical for a SSD by Intel. Assuming a system restore takes two minutes, six seconds, (generous) you would have been doing system restores for a full four years, day and night. :) 

February 28, 2013 4:18:59 PM

babernet_1 said:
Perhaps an RMA was in order. I'd hardly think that behavior is typical for a SSD by Intel. Assuming a system restore takes two minutes, six seconds, (generous) you would have been doing system restores for a full four years, day and night. :) 


Well I was exaggerating there. :lol: 

But my point was that the Intel drive I was using was far from stable even with updating the latest firmware which was dated in 2009. Intel's software department doesn't always keep up with the rest of what they have.
February 28, 2013 9:31:21 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($177.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-14D1XT Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Professional Full (64-bit) ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus MX239H 23.0" Monitor ($238.98 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($131.00 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder 2013 Wired Optical Mouse ($56.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3976.66
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-28 18:30 EST-0500)
February 28, 2013 9:56:50 PM

rts001 said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GEFp/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($177.95 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan 6GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1005.91 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-14D1XT Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Professional Full (64-bit) ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus MX239H 23.0" Monitor ($238.98 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($131.00 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder 2013 Wired Optical Mouse ($56.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3976.66
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-28 18:30 EST-0500)


Dominator Platinum is RIDICULOUSLY overpriced for nothing more than a really fancy heat sink. Don't purchase the Sabertooth as it's overrated and expensive, and that thermal armor is a heat trap. You don't need the i7 for gaming.

On a single 23" 1080p monitor you don't even need 1 Titan, you could just get a single GTX 670 / 680, you're way overpaying for that system there. I'd also forgo the BD-R drive.
February 28, 2013 10:06:45 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Dominator Platinum is RIDICULOUSLY overpriced for nothing more than a really fancy heat sink. Don't purchase the Sabertooth as it's overrated and expensive, and that thermal armor is a heat trap. You don't need the i7 for gaming.

On a single 23" 1080p monitor you don't even need 1 Titan, you could just get a single GTX 670 / 680, you're way overpaying for that system there. I'd also forgo the BD-R drive.


No, the latest games, Metro 2033, Far Cry 3, Crysis 3 bring 680's to their knees, even at 1920 X 1200

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_T...

And that is with only 4X AA. Bring it up to 8 and 680's will scream. My son has a 680 and a lowly 1680 X 1050 and he is unable to max out Far Cry 3.

February 28, 2013 10:17:47 PM

babernet_1 said:
No, the latest games, Metro 2033, Far Cry 3, Crysis 3 bring 680's to their knees, even at 1920 X 1200

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_T...

And that is with only 4X AA. Bring it up to 8 and 680's will scream. My son has a 680 and a lowly 1680 X 1050 and he is unable to max out Far Cry 3.


Really? Even on a single low res monitor? There are very few people who will run resolutions that high on the other two benchmarks.
March 1, 2013 7:00:08 AM

g-unit1111 said:
No they don't. I had an Intel SSD and it gave me nothing but problems - BSODs left and right and it never held a Windows update without me having to do system restore 1,000,000 times. I swapped it for a Samsung 830 and have been completely problem free.


That's one example only which is rather unfair.

Linus from NCIX has access to the RMA statistics and he stated on Youtube that the return rate for Intel SSD's is far, far lower than any other.

I think I'll take those statistics over your single case.
March 1, 2013 7:09:21 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Dominator Platinum is RIDICULOUSLY overpriced for nothing more than a really fancy heat sink. Don't purchase the Sabertooth as it's overrated and expensive, and that thermal armor is a heat trap. You don't need the i7 for gaming.

On a single 23" 1080p monitor you don't even need 1 Titan, you could just get a single GTX 670 / 680, you're way overpaying for that system there. I'd also forgo the BD-R drive.


- I agree, that's a ridiculous amount to pay for DDR3 memory. I paid HALF that for 16GB of G. Skill 2133MHz low latency (and 8GB is plenty for gaming. You ONLY need more for tasks like video editing)

- With this much money I'd probably buy a single Titan, but definitely not two. I have the Asus GTX 680 TOP and always tweak to achieve 60FPS as much as possible. Most games I'm running at max quality. The ONLY game I'm having issues with is Far Cry 3 (everything else is tweaked nicely but FC3 has issues I hope get fixed). Games like BF3 are almost maxed and there's really not much to gain (I'll get a GTX880 later).

*I really think this guy should take a breath as some of the money, like the RAM is simply being wasted. If he's even considering a 2xTitan setup at least get ONE now and see if there's even a reason to add another one.
March 1, 2013 10:49:45 AM

Here's what I would do if I had $3500 to drop at Amazon:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($324.98 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek Dark Knight II SD1283 Night Hawk Edition 89.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($46.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus V Formula EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($269.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($234.53 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($469.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($469.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 600T White Graphite ATX Mid Tower Case ($159.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair 760W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($161.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional Full (32/64-bit) ($263.00 @ Amazon)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($649.99 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: SteelSeries 6GV/2 Wired Standard Keyboard ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Logitech G700 Wireless Laser Mouse ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $3431.39
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-01 07:35 EST-0500)

Those 670s, lightly overclocked, run as well as stock 680s at a lower price.

You could swap out the case for whatever you want, but that one's a great case (if you pick something different and it doesn't say it's EATX-compatible, make sure you can find a pic of a build with an EATX motherboard).

You could do a Titan instead of the 670s. Slightly less theoretical performance, but you get to skip the SLI headache. Trade it for the "waiting for restock" headache.

You could buy the OEM version of Windows to make room for some speakers if you don't have good ones. Only problem with that is you have to buy it again when you replace your motherboard. Basically, the question is: do you want to count on this machine being good enough until Microsoft releases a version of Windows that's at least as good as 7? If so, buy the OEM; if not, buy full. You could also save by getting Home Premium; Pro just gives you room to upgrade the RAM if you wanted to for whatever ungodly reason.

(I bought full Win7 Home Premium 3 builds ago and have not regretted it for even half a second...but it's old news now, Win9 might be coming out in 1.5-2 years, and it might be decent. Or they might release a patch to un-suckify Win8's interface for desktop.)

You could do a different motherboard and spend less, but you'd probably want a soundcard, which would eat the savings.

The cooler I picked is nothing special. It looks nice is all. But you could get the Hyper 212 Evo for a bit cheaper and the same performance. Up to you. You could do custom water at that budget, but that's hard to assemble on Amazon, plus it's a bit of a pain.
March 1, 2013 2:17:17 PM

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($80.46 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Formula ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($339.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair DOMINATOR 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($519.40 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Stryker (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: Thermaltake Toughpower XT 1475W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($322.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.23 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $3488.97
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Look, simply put the 7970s will outperform ANY of the suggestions above by %30 or better. Really the $30 difference in price between the two is WORTH IT they are the top of the line cards. Anyone who recommends those is quite, silly.

EDIT: Subtract a $100 dollars it's really $3388.96 left the wrong PSU on the build: Power Supply: Corsair Professional 1050W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($193.75 @ Amazon) new one
March 1, 2013 2:55:58 PM

It seems he's limited to $3500 since he won that money. I would say try to maximize performance / dollar rather than going for the "getting it just to have it"...My opinion would be different if you had the cash flow to support getting the top end products but in this case I like G-unit's build.
March 1, 2013 3:12:51 PM

burritobob said:
CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($499.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($80.46 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Formula ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($339.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair DOMINATOR 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($519.40 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($429.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Stryker (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: Thermaltake Toughpower XT 1475W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($322.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.23 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $3488.97
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Look, simply put the 7970s will outperform ANY of the suggestions above by %30 or better. Really the $30 difference in price between the two is WORTH IT they are the top of the line cards. Anyone who recommends those is quite, silly.

EDIT: Subtract a $100 dollars it's really $3388.96 left the wrong PSU on the build: Power Supply: Corsair Professional 1050W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($193.75 @ Amazon) new one



I completely agree about the 7970s there but why waste money on the 3930K when you don't need it?
March 1, 2013 3:39:03 PM

g-unit1111 said:
I completely agree about the 7970s there but why waste money on the 3930K when you don't need it?

Good point for gaming the i7 3770k is WAY more than enough to run that system.

Also I forgot to point out in this build the air cooling on this is just as good if not better than the closed loop water cooled suggestions. Plus your going to save $40 ish.

EDIT: Video editing will benefit a fair amount from the i7 3930k though.
March 1, 2013 4:49:09 PM

Yeah if video editing comes second and gaming comes first there's no reason to get a 3930K. You also don't need a massive power supply either.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($192.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($148.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($179.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($196.82 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $2366.42
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-01 13:49 EST-0500)
March 2, 2013 3:02:24 PM

*Important points:
1) CPU Cooler:
The Noctua NH-D14 does NOT have a PWM FAN! Therefore you can NOT control the fan speed with most motherboards (PWM speed control is standard now over Voltage). If you get Liquid or Air make sure it's either PWM fan or there's some sort of AUTO speed control.

*Some Gigabyte boards do have PWM and VOLTAGE fan control.

2) 2xCROSSFIRE is very prone to stutter.
http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...

"..exhibits many of the issues normally associated with dual GPU cards like minor stuttering and outright frame hesitation, "

Not only that, while the HD7970 GHz edition does beat the GTX680 in many games, the evidence is showing that's not without stuttering in SINGLE CARD mode as well:

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...

"Considering Far Cry 3 is a Gaming Evolved title, AMD has an embarrassing problem here. The HD 7970 GHz was actually borderline unplayable with frequent frame hitching despite delivering average framerates of over 34 FPS. On the other hand, the two NVIDIA cards provided a perfectly smooth experience. "

3) Windows:
Windows 8 64-bit is definitely the best choice (with START8). I both build PC's and also use Windows 8. With Start8 it's basically the same interface as Windows 7 but it's superior in many ways.

4) Hard Drive:
Get a 2TB or 3TB drive.
*I get why people recommend the 1TB Black drive, however don't forget that hard drive performance DROPS SIGNIFICANTLY as it fills (to HALF THE SPEED so larger, slower drives perform BETTER part way into filling up).

The Western Digital 3TB drive has 3x the space and most of that will perform better than the 1TB Black (quality on the RED drive is supposed to be quite good as well):
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=74269&vpn=WD30EFRX&man...

Review:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6157/western-digital-red-...

(*Prices where much higher when reviewed. You can now get a 3TB RED for only $140 versus the 1TB Black for $100. So this drive is FASTER most of the time, more reliable and has THREE TIMES the capacity for $40 more? Not bad. )
!