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Building a gaming pc

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February 27, 2013 10:47:45 PM

Hi im trying to build a new pc because the one i have is limited to only 4gb of ram and yada yada. I need a new OS and have about a $1000 to spend. I would rather go AMD so i can get the best parts possible but cheaper than intel. If anyone could point me in the right direction with a list of some sort i would greatly appreciate it.

More about : building gaming

February 28, 2013 12:40:36 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.98 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-880GM-D2H Micro ATX AM3 Motherboard ($90.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($55.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($75.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V ($80.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $970.85
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 21:39 EST-0500)

"Best parts possible but cheaper" is kind of an oxymoron as far as I'm concerned but here's the best build I can think of for $1000. I'd be willing to bet that putting that up against the same system with the i5-3570K would spell disaster for the AMD but if that build above is all you need then it doesn't matter anyhow.

February 28, 2013 12:43:49 AM

how does this one i made look? http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtI2

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtI2
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtI2/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtI2/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($23.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock 990FX Extreme4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston 12GB (3 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($69.99 @ Mac Mall)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 650 Ti 2GB Video Card ($163.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($101.60 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($86.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DVDE818A7T/BLK/B/GEN CD Reader, DVD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $956.46
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 22:02 EST-0500)
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February 28, 2013 1:16:49 AM

You said you'd rather go AMD but then you chose a CPU that was almost as much as the i5-3570K and a motherboard that was the same price as a few of the most popular intel-based boards and then spending 2x what you need for a case. In my opinion, a better GPU will go further than an 8-core CPU.
a b 4 Gaming
February 28, 2013 1:20:12 AM

CPU: AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock 990FX Extreme4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($49.50 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 1TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.97 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($128.11 @ Amazon)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($289.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Scout ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Cooler Master GX 650W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1018.00
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Includes an SSD for top of the line performance. You really cannot beat this.
a b 4 Gaming
February 28, 2013 1:23:20 AM

sharkbyte5150 said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.98 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-880GM-D2H Micro ATX AM3 Motherboard ($90.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($55.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($75.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V ($80.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $970.85
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 21:39 EST-0500)

"Best parts possible but cheaper" is kind of an oxymoron as far as I'm concerned but here's the best build I can think of for $1000. I'd be willing to bet that putting that up against the same system with the i5-3570K would spell disaster for the AMD but if that build above is all you need then it doesn't matter anyhow.


A couple things to note about this "recommended" build.

1st, the CPU is the epitome of low end performance, you really do not get the most out of your pc from using that sort of processor.

2nd that motherboard was not very well done, stick to a higher reviewed mobo, you really do not want to skimp on that.

3rd. the 670 when paired with that CPU is just a bottle necked piece of junk really. You need a better CPU to unlock the full potential of that card. Anyways the thread creator preferred AMD cards in the first place. You really cannot compete with the 7950.
a b 4 Gaming
February 28, 2013 1:23:28 AM

sharkbyte5150 said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtHE/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($94.98 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-880GM-D2H Micro ATX AM3 Motherboard ($90.00 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($55.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($75.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V ($80.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $970.85
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-02-27 21:39 EST-0500)

"Best parts possible but cheaper" is kind of an oxymoron as far as I'm concerned but here's the best build I can think of for $1000. I'd be willing to bet that putting that up against the same system with the i5-3570K would spell disaster for the AMD but if that build above is all you need then it doesn't matter anyhow.


A couple things to note about this "recommended" build.

1st, the CPU is the epitome of low end performance, you really do not get the most out of your pc from using that sort of processor.

2nd that motherboard was not very well done, stick to a higher reviewed mobo, you really do not want to skimp on that.

3rd. the 670 when paired with that CPU is just a bottle necked piece of junk really. You need a better CPU to unlock the full potential of that card. Anyways the thread creator preferred AMD cards in the first place. You really cannot compete with the 7950.
February 28, 2013 1:24:26 AM

I like Bob's build but doesn't include OS so puts him just a tad over budget to include the SSD and 2nd drive, but I definitely agree to using SSD.

Maybe if gogopro has a large drive spare he can save the money on the second drive and use that money for OS and then I'd say go with Bob's build.
a b 4 Gaming
February 28, 2013 1:27:22 AM

sharkbyte5150 said:
I like Bob's build but doesn't include OS so puts him just a tad over budget to include the SSD and 2nd drive, but I definitely agree to using SSD.

Maybe if gogopro has a large drive spare he can save the money on the second drive and use that money for OS and then I'd say go with Bob's build.


Meh, linu is free, and it can play just about EVERY game with a little bit of tweaking. A quick google search and an hour of your time and you can have that up and running in no time. The SSD is always going to be worth it, but if you do NEED windows 7 then cut that out of the build.
February 28, 2013 1:40:13 AM

burritobob said:
A couple things to note about this "recommended" build.

1st, the CPU is the epitome of low end performance, you really do not get the most out of your pc from using that sort of processor.

2nd that motherboard was not very well done, stick to a higher reviewed mobo, you really do not want to skimp on that.

3rd. the 670 when paired with that CPU is just a bottle necked piece of junk really. You need a better CPU to unlock the full potential of that card. Anyways the thread creator preferred AMD cards in the first place. You really cannot compete with the 7950.



Funny, because most of the time I recommend the 7950 for a gamer in this price range but most say that it's a close race between that and the 670 anyhow.

I had no idea the 965 was rated so poorly, I don't use AMD so I was just finding what I thought would be the closest thing to the 3570K (a quad-core 3.xGHZ). Makes sense then that the 670 would be a waste. When building a gamer, I always go for best CPU/GPU first and then build around it for the budget but my lack of knowledge with AMD obviously got the best of me this time around.
February 28, 2013 2:08:56 AM

sorry im such a newbie but what things do i put on my ssd? or in other words what makes my PC that much better with it?
February 28, 2013 2:15:40 AM

sharkbyte5150 said:

I had no idea the 965 was rated so poorly, I don't use AMD so I was just finding what I thought would be the closest thing to the 3570K (a quad-core 3.xGHZ). Makes sense then that the 670 would be a waste. When building a gamer, I always go for best CPU/GPU first and then build around it for the budget but my lack of knowledge with AMD obviously got the best of me this time around.


Clocks and cores aren't everything.

gogopro said:
sorry im such a newbie but what things do i put on my ssd? or in other words what makes my PC that much better with it?


SSDs have much faster read/write times than conventional HDDs, so it's an overall speed boost to things that require a lot of disk access.
If you're going for a smaller SSD (120-240GB), then it should be your boot drive. Your OS and programs should go on it, and maybe a couple games. Downloads/documents/media would go on an HDD.

gogopro said:
how does this one i made look? http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GtI2

Memory: Kingston 12GB (3 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($69.99 @ Mac Mall)


12GB RAM is a bit much for gaming. You're better off getting a 2x4GB DDR3-1600 kit.
a b 4 Gaming
February 28, 2013 3:09:42 AM

Remember although SSDs will drastically improve boot times and program startup times, it will not help gaming frames per second or other calculation based.

If you cannot budget it, it would be OK to drop if you can stand waiting a bit to boot or start programs.
!